Whaling meat with 1,816 tons of whale meat from Iceland has been delivered to Osaka, Japan, traveling through the Arctic Ocean apparently not to face the anti-whaling groups located in the Indian Ocean.

Picture: Internet
1,816 tons of whale meat from Iceland delivered to Osaka, Japan, August 2015

Outrage as tons of whale meat to Japan — via Iceland
1 September 2015
A vessel with 1,816 tons of whale meat from Iceland has been delivered to Osaka, Japan, traveling through the Arctic Ocean apparently not to face the anti-whaling groups located in the Indian Ocean.
1,816 tons of meat accounts for about 40 percent of the country’s annual consumption, The Japan Times reported.
The ship left Iceland with the cargo three months earlier, according to Newsweek.
The Winter Bay is initially a Norwegian vessel flying the flag of St. Kitts and Nevis, a so-called “flag of convenience”, allowing fewer regulations and taxes.
Over 1 million people signed a petition demanding that the ship removes the flag on the activist website Avaaz.
The fin whale has been declared endangered species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, and Japan is one of its members.
Greenpeace has also stated that Japan uses another way of receiving the whale meat — the Arctic Northeast Passage, according to The Japan Times.
The organization fiercely protested the vessel arrival in Japan, saying the catch amounted to 137 whales hunted down in Iceland last year.
The Convention on Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) makes it illegal to transport the whale meat, however, the rule doesn’t apply to Iceland, Norway, and Japan.
In March, the International court of Justice ordered Japan to stop hunting whales which the country does for alleged “scientific research”.
Despite the ban, in June, Japan's chief whaling negotiator Joji Morishita announced that the country would continue the hunting, but via the Antarctic — a plan deemed unconvincing by the International Whaling Commission scientific committee.
Whale slaughter 150 whales in Faroe Islands July 2015 - download video mp4

A vessel with 1,816 tons of whale meat from Iceland has been delivered to Osaka, Japan, traveling through the Arctic Ocean apparently not to face the anti-whaling groups located in the Indian Ocean.

Photo: internet
Whale slaughter 150 whales in Faroe Islands July 2015 - download video mp4

A vessel with 1,816 tons of whale meat from Iceland has been delivered to Osaka, Japan, traveling through the Arctic Ocean apparently not to face the anti-whaling groups located in the Indian Ocean.

Photo: internet
Whale slaughter 150 whales in Faroe Islands July 2015 - download video mp4

A vessel with 1,816 tons of whale meat from Iceland has been delivered to Osaka, Japan, traveling through the Arctic Ocean apparently not to face the anti-whaling groups located in the Indian Ocean.

Photo: internet
Whale slaughter 150 whales in Faroe Islands July 2015 - download video mp4

A vessel with 1,816 tons of whale meat from Iceland has been delivered to Osaka, Japan, traveling through the Arctic Ocean apparently not to face the anti-whaling groups located in the Indian Ocean.

Photo: internet
Whale slaughter 150 whales in Faroe Islands July 2015 - download video mp4

A vessel with 1,816 tons of whale meat from Iceland has been delivered to Osaka, Japan, traveling through the Arctic Ocean apparently not to face the anti-whaling groups located in the Indian Ocean.

Photo: internet
Whale slaughter 150 whales in Faroe Islands July 2015 - download video mp4

A vessel with 1,816 tons of whale meat from Iceland has been delivered to Osaka, Japan, traveling through the Arctic Ocean apparently not to face the anti-whaling groups located in the Indian Ocean.

Photo: internet
Whale slaughter 150 whales in Faroe Islands July 2015 - download video mp4

A vessel with 1,816 tons of whale meat from Iceland has been delivered to Osaka, Japan, traveling through the Arctic Ocean apparently not to face the anti-whaling groups located in the Indian Ocean.

Photo: internet
Whale slaughter 150 whales in Faroe Islands July 2015 - download video mp4

A vessel with 1,816 tons of whale meat from Iceland has been delivered to Osaka, Japan, traveling through the Arctic Ocean apparently not to face the anti-whaling groups located in the Indian Ocean.

Photo: internet
Whale slaughter 150 whales in Faroe Islands July 2015 - download video mp4

A vessel with 1,816 tons of whale meat from Iceland has been delivered to Osaka, Japan, traveling through the Arctic Ocean apparently not to face the anti-whaling groups located in the Indian Ocean.

Photo: internet
Whale slaughter 150 whales in Faroe Islands July 2015 - download video mp4

A vessel with 1,816 tons of whale meat from Iceland has been delivered to Osaka, Japan, traveling through the Arctic Ocean apparently not to face the anti-whaling groups located in the Indian Ocean.

Photo: internet
Whale slaughter 150 whales in Faroe Islands July 2015 - download video mp4

A vessel with 1,816 tons of whale meat from Iceland has been delivered to Osaka, Japan, traveling through the Arctic Ocean apparently not to face the anti-whaling groups located in the Indian Ocean.

Photo: internet
Whale slaughter 150 whales in Faroe Islands July 2015 - download video mp4

A vessel with 1,816 tons of whale meat from Iceland has been delivered to Osaka, Japan, traveling through the Arctic Ocean apparently not to face the anti-whaling groups located in the Indian Ocean.

Photo: internet
U.S. Navy asserts 'state secrets' privilege to keep from being forced to disclose information about the use of sonar killing whales and other sea life
 
Published on Thursday, April 12, 2007 by Inter Press Service
Top U.S. Sushi Company Linked to Whaling
by Stephen Leahy
BROOKLIN, Canada — An investigation has revealed that the U.S. supplier of sushi to more than 6,000 restaurants is associated with a Japanese company that sells millions of tins of whale meat.
Despite a global ban on killing whales, Japan’s Kyokuyo, a multinational seafood conglomerate, sells between 10 and 20 million cans of whale meat a year, according to an Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) report released Tuesday.
“Kyokuyo is breaking international laws,” said Alan Thornton, president of EIA, an environmental group based in the United States and Britain.
“Since the 1930s, Kyokuyo has been profiting from the deaths of an estimated 130,000 great whales,” Thornton told IPS.
There has been a global ban on whaling since 1986. However, the Japanese claim the 1,000 or more whales they hunt each year in the Antarctic Ocean are for scientific research.
Whale meat is found in leading Japanese supermarkets, and Kyokuyo is perhaps the leading distributor, he says.
“To be clear, whale meat is not being sold in the U.S.,” said Kitty Block, director of Treaty Law, Oceans, and Wildlife Protection at the Humane Society International (HSI).
“What we want is to make sure no U.S. company is involved in any way with killing whales,” Block said in an interview.
Kyokuyo recently partnered with True World Foods of New Jersey, a leading seafood and sushi distributor with 280 million dollars in annual sales, to market frozen sushi under the brand name “Polar Seas Frozen Sushi”.
The product is slated to hit grocery stores here as early as this summer.
Block and other activists are asking grocery stores to “think twice before placing Polar Seas products on their shelves”.
They may have been another reason, according to the Chicago Tribune newspaper.
True World Foods is part of the True World Group founded by Rev. Sun Myung Moon’s Unification Church, a controversial religious cult now run by his followers, the Tribune reported Monday.
True World Foods CEO Takeshi Yashiro has been a member since at least 1980 when Rev. Moon directed followers to go into the seafood business to support the Church and end world hunger.
Moon’s followers now build fleets of boats, run dozens of distribution centres and fishing processing operations and supply most U.S. sushi restaurants.
A portion of True World’s profits go to the Unification Church, Yashiro told the Tribune.
Neither True World Foods nor Kyokuyo have responded to requests from the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), EIA and HSI to end their association with whale products, says Patrick Ramage, IFAW’s Global Whale Campaign Manager.
U.S. citizens from all income groups and political backgrounds have a high level of concern about whales, according to Ramage.
A recent survey of 1,000 U.S. voters found that 69 percent would boycott seafood restaurants known to use suppliers involved with Japanese whaling companies, Ramage said in a teleconference.
“There is very strong and consistent support for the ban on whaling,” he noted.
Despite international condemnation and standing virtually alone on whaling, Japanese government-financed whalers spent the last few months hunting for whales in the Southern Ocean.
Dogged by anti-whaling groups like IFAW and Greenpeace, the whaling factory ship the Nisshin Maru experienced a damaging fire which greatly shortened this year’s hunt.
Before the Nisshin Maru could return to Japan, the International Whaling Commission (IWC) completed its study of Japan’s 18 years of so-called whale research in the Southern Ocean, and stated that little new had been learned.
“Japan’s support for whaling has little to do with a demand for consuming whale meat,” said Thornton.
First barred from entering Tokyo Bay
Then allowed to dock but only on condition not to hold public events on ship
Most Japanese don’t like whale meat
Most Japanese don’t like it and there are an estimated 4,600 tonnes of whale meat in storage. Meanwhile the Japanese government is trying to push whale burgers, he says.
“This more about Japan’s Fisheries Ministry insisting on unfettered access to global marine resources,” said Ramage.
Japan has spent millions of yen buying support from other countries that sit on the IWC to try to overturn the ban on commercial whaling, he said.
Whale watching is a huge and fast-growing industry worldwide, including in Japan. And there is growing scientific evidence that the great whales are of fundamental importance in the marine food web.
Their depletion — just 20,000 humpback whales remain when there may have been 1.5 million before commercial hunting — has had significant impacts on the oceans, marine scientists believe.
Unfortunately, whales became endangered before science could begin to determine their role.
Despite the 20-year ban on hunting, most whale populations are not recovering and it may be take another 50 to 100 years before they do, according to experts like Bruce Mate, director of the Oregon State University Marine Mammal Programme.
Public pressure has been effective in persuading other Japanese companies to pull out of the whaling business, notes the Humane Society’s Block.
She hopes that such pressure will push True World Foods to ask Kyokuyo to stop selling whale products.
And more pressure is coming Japan’s way from non-governmental organisations and governments, notably the United States, at the upcoming IWC meeting in Alaska this May, says Ramage.
“Everyone wants the hunting of whales to end,” he said.
Copyright © 2007 IPS-Inter Press Service.
Common Dreams © 1997-2007
 
The whale had been hit.
   It was mortally wounded
Monday, 9 January 2006
by Andrew, onboard the Esperenza Greenpeace     Ocean Defenders Weblog
Today ended with a sad and bizarre scene.
At first we thought they had missed.
Both of our boats were caught far out of position — on the whaler's starboard (right), while the whale was to port (left) and ahead.
Then the Hughie (heli pilot) reported blood in the water.
A huge amount of blood.
The whale had been hit.
It was mortally wounded, but for the first time we have seen the harpoon had not set.
Our boats fell to the back of the Yushin Maru No. 2, well out of its way — hoping the whalers would end the animal's suffering.
Whale murdered by the Japanese
Whale murdered by the Japanese
The whale had been hit.
   It was mortally wounded
Monday, 9 January 2006
by Andrew, onboard the Esperenza Greenpeace     Ocean Defenders Weblog
It is an unpleasant oddity, this moment when Greenpeace activists and the whalers want the same thing...the end of a whale's life.
We put our boats in the way, we put our safety on the line, we endure freezing cold spray and brutal conditions to protect whales.
But after the harpoon hits home, it is only a matter of ending the poor thing's pain.
We often see that taking minutes — sometimes five, sometimes ten, sometimes longer.
This time it took roughly half an hour.
Whale mortally wounded

Killed by Japanese
Whale mortally wounded
Murdered by the Japanese
The whale had been hit.
   It was mortally wounded
Monday, 9 January 2006
by Andrew, onboard the Esperenza Greenpeace     Ocean Defenders Weblog
The whalers reloaded the harpoon and took a second shot.
A miss.
Then the whale slipped away from all of us.
The whalers, our helicopter, everyone.
We knew it was dying.
In pain and barely able to swim.
Whale - pain - death

Murdered by the Japanese
Whale — pain — death
Murdered by the Japanese
The whale had been hit.
   It was mortally wounded
Monday, 9 January 2006
by Andrew, onboard the Esperenza Greenpeace     Ocean Defenders Weblog
There is an irony as deep as the big blue ocean that while stranded pilot whales were being saved in Golden Bay, a few hundred kilometers south rare minke whales were being slaughtered by Japanese pirates, Green Party Conservation Spokesperson Metiria Turei says.
"Kia kaha to Greenpeace, their shocking footage of high seas butchery in a whale sanctuary has shown the total, unrelenting moral bankruptcy of Japan's so-called scientific whaling programme.
"The Greens call on all New Zealanders who felt for the whales in Golden Bay, or have seen the Greenpeace film, to write to the Japanese Government and express their outrage.
"We also applaud Conservation Minister Chris Carter's release this afternoon of a scientific critique of Japan's whaling.
We are pleased to be working with him to progress the issue on the political level.
"Japan's whaling is about a meat market, it has nothing to do with cultural expression whatsoever," Mrs Turei says.
Whale - pain - death

Murdered by the Japanese
Whale - pain - death
Murdered by the Japanese
The Greenpeace film of the Japanese whalers is at:       http://oceans.greenpeace.org/en/ocean-defenders-tv.
Messages can be sent to the Japanese Embassy in Wellington via:       http://www.nz.emb-japan.go.jp/feedback.html
or PO Box 6340, Wellington.
All images Greenpeace photographers
Whale - pain - death

Murdered by the Japanese
Whale - pain - death

Murdered by the Japanese
Mass whale deaths tied to U.S. Navy sonar, report says

TOKYO — The U.S. Navy's deployment of active sonar to detect submarine activity is believed to have been responsible for at least six incidents of mass death and unusual behavior among pods of whales in the last 10 years, according to a recent U.S. Congressional Research Service report.
In one of the most serious incidents, 150 to 200 melon-headed whales were observed milling in Hanalei Bay off Hawaii's Kauai Island during a Rim of the Pacific Exercise on July 3, 2004, after midfrequency sonar was used, the CRS report said.
Known as RIMPAC, the naval exercise included the participation of Japan and other U.S. allies in Asia and the Pacific.
The CRS report also listed five other incidents in which smaller whales, such as goose-beaked whales, harbor porpoises and killer whales, were found beached and dead in groups of a few to nearly 20.   Many of the dead mammals had damaged hearing organs, and all five incidents coincided with U.S. naval exercises in the areas, the report said.
The potential impact of active military sonar on marine mammals, whose hearing is critical for their survival, has long been a concern.   Even the deployment of low-frequency active sonar is said to cause a roaring sound comparable to that of a twin-engine jet fighter, while the midfrequency sound is believed to equal that of a rocket.   Experts have warned that the sound could critically damage the mammals' hearing organs.
      The Yomiuri Shimbun      April 15, 2006      
Tuesday, 9 March, 2004
Whaling 'too cruel to continue'
By Alex Kirby
BBC News Online environment correspondent
Minke whale

Minkes whales are a common catch.

Francois Gohier/Ardea London
Minkes whales are a common catch (Image: Francois Gohier/Ardea London)
Animal welfare campaigners say methods of killing whales are so inhumane that all whaling operations should cease.
A coalition of 140 groups, Whalewatch, says many whales do not die quickly when hit, and tests to decide exactly when a whale is dead are inadequate.
The well-known UK naturalist Sir David Attenborough says in a foreword that Whalewatch's report shows "there is no humane way to kill a whale at sea".
But whalers say their methods are not cruel, and reject calls to end whaling.
Whaling continues
The Whalewatch report, Troubled Waters, is published to mark the start of a global campaign against whaling.
Coalition members, from 55 countries, include the World Society for the Protection of Animals and the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society.
The gunners themselves admit that if whales could scream the industry would stop, for nobody would be able to stand it
Dr Harry Lillie
Whalewatch is lobbying the International Whaling Commission to halt all commercial and scientific whaling, to maintain the commercial whaling moratorium in force since 1986, and to concentrate on the issue of cruelty.
The report says more than 1,400 whales are likely to die this year alone, despite the moratorium.
Most whales are killed with harpoons designed to explode inside them, though small traditional coastal communities in the Arctic and elsewhere use other methods.
Three IWC members, Japan, Norway and Iceland, continue to kill whales in accordance with the commission's rules.
Icy sea and whalecatcher

Sea conditions may make a good aim impossible.

WDCS
Sea conditions may make a good aim impossible
Japan and Iceland kill them for what they say is scientific research, allowed by the IWC; Norway is not bound by the moratorium because it voted against it.
The IWC was established in 1946 to conserve whaling, and also to conserve whales. It holds periodic workshops on humane killing methods, but given the deep splits in its membership between supporters and opponents of whaling, agreement is elusive.
Dr Nicola Grandy, the IWC secretary, told BBC News Online: "Our competence to address the issue of humane killing is questioned by some members.
"All member governments take it seriously, but there are different views on whether whaling is inhumane and should be stopped.
"The Norwegians, for example, do kill a high percentage of their whales instantaneously."
Whalewatch says Norway reported around 20% of whales failed to die instantaneously in 2002/3, and that Japan reported almost 60% were not killed outright.
Enough reason to stop
It says the average estimated time to death is more than two minutes, and that some whales take over an hour to die.
It is also concerned at the use of rifles and other ways to despatch whales which have survived being harpooned.
Whale Harpooner

Norway makes its harpooners take annual tests.

WDCS
Norway makes its harpooners take annual tests.
It says criteria for assessing the time it takes a whale to die are unreliable, with some animals possibly surviving long after they are judged to be dead.
Whalewatch concludes: "On grounds of animal welfare alone, all whaling operations should be halted."
John Opdahl of the Norwegian Embassy in London told BBC News Online: "For many years, the IWC has given high priority to efforts to improve whaling methods in order to minimize unnecessary, protracted suffering, and Norway has always led the way in these efforts.
"The methods now used in minke whaling are as good as or better than those in other forms of big-game hunting as regards both death times and the percentage of whales that are merely injured."
Sir David's foreword quotes Dr Harry Lillie, a ship's physician on an Antarctic whaling trip in the 1940s.
Dr Lillie wrote: "If we can imagine a horse having two or three explosive spears stuck in its stomach and being made to pull a butcher's truck through the streets of London while it pours blood into the gutter, we shall have an idea of the method of killing.
"The gunners themselves admit that if whales could scream the industry would stop, for nobody would be able to stand it."
All images except minke whale copyright and courtesy of the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society.
Whale species is new to science
19 Nov 03 |  Science/Nature
Iceland hunters kill whale
19 Aug 03 |  Science/Nature
Whale commission future 'in jeopardy'
19 Jun 03 |  Science/Nature


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BBC Thursday, 22 April 2010
Dolphin hunt: 'We must open our eyes'
The Japanese town of Taiji received unwelcome attention when The Cove, a film following its annual dolphin hunt, won an Oscar.
Sayuri (not her real name), who worked as a dolphin trainer in Taiji in the 1990s, gives her reaction to the film.
When I saw the film I was deeply shocked.
What the movie shows is very similar to my own experience of working as a dolphin trainer in Taiji.
Only it went further and showed things that even I hadn't seen.
Before I ever became a dolphin trainer, I had read many books that made me think that keeping dolphins in captivity was bad.
I wondered whether or not I should choose this profession and I decided to temporarily leave the aquarium that I was working at.
Former dolphin trainer Sayuri.

I wanted to free them but did not have the courage

Before I ever became a dolphin trainer, I had read many books that made me think that keeping dolphins in captivity was bad.
Former dolphin trainer Sayuri
I wanted to free them but did not have the courage
I set out for Japan's Ogasawara Islands to meet some wild dolphins.
I was literally blown away when I first saw wild dolphins.
Those dolphins were smiling, they were happy.
They had an agility that the dolphins in aquariums just didn't have.
I became worried about the dolphins that I had left behind in the aquarium.
I wanted to protect them, to make their lives just a little happier.
And so I became a trainer of captive dolphins.
I did my best as a dolphin trainer to devise ways to let the dolphins enjoy their time in the pools by teaching them tricks and trying to give them incentives to have fun.
I used to go to that same cove — the one in the film — every time fishermen would capture a group of bottlenose dolphins.
My job was to see if there were any dolphins suitable for captivity in an aquarium.
Once we'd selected a few, we used to separate them into a selection pool and get them onto tanker boats.
It was a tremendous sight.
It was always a fight for time so we had to move as quickly as possible.
I knew that the dolphins that were not selected for the aquarium would be killed and their meat sold for food.
I was constantly at a loss for words about how that made me feel.
I often had the impulse
to cut the rope that secured
the nets, but I didn't have
the courage
All I could see was that a rope was tied around the fin and they were taken away.
What I didn't know was that they get trapped in a small cove and killed in such a violent way, that the ocean would turn red from their blood.
There was one time when I went to the cove every day.
It was when a family of killer whales was chosen for the aquarium.
They were anxiously swimming around and with each passing day, the big dorsal fin of the leader of the group would turn over on its side and it would look up with such a sad expression.
I often had the impulse to cut the rope that secured the nets, but I didn't have the courage.
'Profitable business'
After I finally left the profession, I travelled around the world to see wild dolphins.
When I was in New Zealand, I was on a bus with people who were organising a petition against dolphin and whale hunting in Japan.
I was the only Japanese person on the bus and I felt extremely embarrassed at the time.
"A fishing boat sails to catch whales off Taiji, Wakayama Prefecture, western Japan
Fishermen in Taiji hunt both dolphins and small whales
I think it is about time that we Japanese people open our eyes to what we are doing and what the rest of the world is asking of us.
I know that whale meat was a common staple a long time ago. It was common in school lunches until the 1970s, for example.
I have heard that there are many places outside Taiji where you can eat whale meat, but I believe it is a seasonal product and I have not often seen it.
Additionally, restaurants that serve whale meat tend to be extremely expensive, so only a very small number of people who have a particular desire for the "best" whale meat go there.
The selling and eating of dolphin meat in Japan is limited to a small number of people.
Most people in Japan have no idea that dolphins are being killed for meat.
People don't come across such information in their everyday lives, so they simply do not know about it.
There are people who talk about the hunting being part of our culture.
But our culture doesn't have to be such a terrible culture.
There is no longer a necessity for dolphin hunting and the people who are doing it now are simply doing it for profit.
I have seen myself fisherman rejoicing over news that a group of killer whales was caught and that a lot of money would be coming in.
It is just a small group of hard-headed men who continue the practice of dolphin hunting with the excuse of protecting our culture.
Foreigners would often come to Taiji to buy dolphins and I remember them saying that Taiji was the only place in the world where they were able to buy dolphins so easily.
I'm sure that if the dolphin hunting at Taiji were to stop, the captivity of dolphins in aquariums around the world would go down.
I wish that The Cove could be seen by as many Japanese people as possible so that they would understand what is really going on.
I hope dolphin hunting can finally be stopped and peace brought back to the lives of the dolphins.
Sayuri's comments were translated by Michael Nelson
© MMX
Humans and their governments will do terrible things to other humans and to other animals if allowed!
Cody speaking for our farm animal companions - download video mp4

Photo: internet
Cody speaking for our farm animal companions
For the animals
A little bit of empathy for the animals
They also have a life, like your children or your family.
Eastern Grey Kangaroo called Doodlebug orphaned at birth.
Doodlebug holding tight to the teddy bear lies next to it, practices his kicking against it and cuddles the stuffed bear.
The little kangaroo has been nursed to health to live in the wild but still comes back for the occasional feeding or cuddle.
PDF and now EPub versions for small tablets and Kindle, Nook and varied e-readers
The Game - The Enslavement Dream - Manor House Oath Highway.

TheWE.cc
Part of an email I sent:
Hello,
I've just posted a new book, available free on .pdf and epub format.
The book is also available by chapter from TheWE.cc
The chapter link below has a section on animal treatment on the planet.
http://thewe.cc/contents/the-game/chapters/27-keweland.html
Scroll/Search down to:
Kewe gives a rendering of a speech ‘He makes before a Galactic Council.
Best wishes:
Kewe.
 
 
     

 
 
 
For archive purposes, this article is being stored on TheWE.cc website.
The purpose is to advance understandings of environmental, political,
human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues.