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The purpose is to advance understandings of environmental, political,
human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues.

 

UK group raps food giants for ‘shocking’ animal tests
Monday Aug 24, 2015
A British advocacy group has condemned international food giants for carrying out ‘shocking’ animal tests to gain and maximize their profits.
Cruelty Free International, a London-based animal protection and advocacy group which campaigns for the abolition of animal experiments, has in its latest report exposed cruel animal tests carried out by some of the world's leading food companies: Danone, Nestlé and Yakult.
In an exposé published on the Sunday Express, the group said pet dogs, hamsters and pigs are being radiated, force-fed and subjected to tubes implanted in their organs during cruel animal testing by the world’s leading food giants to ‘identify new money-making angles on products.’ The animals were ultimately killed.
The report quoted Katy Taylor, director of science at Cruelty Free International as saying that “the public will be shocked to learn these well-known and familiar high street brands are involved in sickening experiments on animals.”
In one case, Yakult researchers working in South Korea force-fed five-week-old hairless mice with probiotic bacteria an hour before beaming them with ultraviolet light from lamps just 12.7cm away from their skin.
The excruciating procedure was repeated three times a week for 12 weeks with the dose of radiation increasing as time went on, the report added.
Animal rights campaigners are now urging the public to boycott Danone, Nestle and Yakult to stop the animal suffering.
Back in June, another Sunday report said the UK Ministry of Defense (MoD) researchers tested on 4,124 monkeys, pigs, rabbits, guinea pigs and rodents in 2014 alone.
The animals were infected with deadly diseases including Ebola and the plague in "grotesque" experiments funded by the British government, it added.
They all died during the torturous process, which can last months.
Animal abuse cruelty Nestle Danone Yakult.

Animal rights campaigners are now urging the public to boycott Danone, Nestle and Yakult to stop the animal suffering.

Image: express.co.uk
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Humans and their governments will do terrible things to other humans and to other animals if allowed!
Killing - unbelievable cruelty to animals

Image: RT.com
Chickens alive in slaughter factory
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Humans will torture by force feeding other humans and animals such as the United States and United Kingdom are doing in mental institutions, prisons and with intensive animal farming
Killing - unbelievable cruelty to animals

Image: RT.com
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
When someone who is given authority commands
most humans will obey!
Killing - unbelievable cruelty to animals

Image: RT.com
Killing - unbelievable cruelty to animals

Image: RT.com
Paralysed but not unconscious
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Translated to religion it is humans taking authority from other dimensional
off-planet beings who create religion
that gives pretext of authority so other humans obey
Killing - unbelievable cruelty to animals

Image: RT.com
Dolphin asks diver for help
Dolphin asks diver for help.

A dolphin entangled in a fishing line is freed by a diver in Hawaii.

Martina Wing said that the dolphin seems to communicate with the diver to ask for help.

She describes the experience as mind-blowing.

Dolphin rescue caught on underwater camera.

Photo: Martina Wing, Ocean Wings Hawaii, Inc.
A dolphin entangled in a fishing line is freed by a diver in Hawaii.
Martina Wing said that the dolphin seems to communicate with the diver to ask for help.
She describes the experience as mind-blowing.
Cruelty to Animals imprisoned.

Abbey Martin Breaking the Set April 23 2014 with Ryan Shapiro.

Photo: Internet
Cruelty to Animals imprisoned.

Abbey Martin Breaking the Set April 23 2014 with Ryan Shapiro.

Photo: Internet
Cruelty to Animals imprisoned.

Abbey Martin Breaking the Set April 23 2014 with Ryan Shapiro.

Photo: Internet
Cruelty to Imprisoned Animals — Abby Martin speaking with Ryan Shapiro
Breaking The Set — April 22 2014 — Pat Tillman’s real legacy — YouTube
mp4 — right click here to download Ryan Shapiro segment from TheWE 69.73.165.39
Animal cruelty Halal meat
Animal cruelty Halal meat.

Image Internet
Animals both feel pain and love.
The only difference between a cow, or a pig, or a hen, is that they do not have the reasoning ability that humans have.
They have emotions exactly as humans.
Because humans do have reasoning ability, it is especially their responsibility that they do treat animals with respect, and their death with respect.
There is nothing as vile and cruel as the slaughter of animals for Halal meat carried out by both Muslims and Jews.
Muslims and Jews must recognise this cruelty that they force into an animal's death process.
Muslims and Jews would not like themselves to be hung up and allowed to die while blood was being drained from them.
It is the responsibility of humans who do not allow this practice to continue to not allow this practice of obtaining Halal meat.
The new European law is in error.
This law must be corrected and revoked.
There is no instance where animals should be allowed to die while still conscious, and especially so with the blood being drained from them as is the practice of Muslims and Jews.
Kewe.
Dragged through electrified vat of water
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
I really don't understand humans!
They have pets!
They love their dogs, their cats to extremes!
They know these loved ones have emotions, that they are not so different from themselves!
Yet when it comes to the animals they eat — and the food that they feed their cats and dogs — they don't want to know that these animals that are now churned up into bags once did also convey love!
Humans turn away!
Dragged through electrified vat of water
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
They cannot face they eat something that has emotion, that these valued life that they place in their mouth once did feel, that they once did convey earnestness, sympathy, passion, blush, cordiality, ardor, fervency, shock, fear, palpitation.
For most of those eaten by humans, soft and gentle are their emotions!
Humans turn away from the great cruelty that forced feeding intensive growing pens bring to the clouded pain-ridden lives of beings who are placed in such situations!
They turn away from the great cruelty that takes place in the killing of their meat!
I love the animals.   I walk amongst the European farmlands and experience the soft and gentle emotions these beings give forth!
Many farm animals in Europe, much more so than in America, are treated to decent lives before they are killed for food.
But Europe now also has turned to cruelty to produce its meat!
Meat: chicken and pork and livestock from the cruelty intensive farms of Asia!
Meat: chicken pork livestock from the cruelty intensive farms of Europe and America!
There is a lack of compassion, a lack of anything to do with the higher values we attribute to 'humans' in forced feeding intensive growing!
Something only done for money!
To make someone that much richer!
Is it a stupidity one has to wonder that makes humans not face their deeds!
Yes, humans would pay more if animals were treated with the respect they demand!
But this is surely better than eating pain-grown meat!
Meat can now be grown from cells!
Another option to stop the awful life now being experienced in these enclosed pens
A lack of compassion, a lack of anything to do with the higher values we attribute to 'humans' exist in forced feeding intensive growing!
Kewe
Paralysed but not unconscious
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Saturday, 6 September 2008
By Richard Black
Environment correspondent, BBC News website
Cow road sign

Livestock production has a bigger climate impact than transport, the UN believes
Livestock production has a bigger climate impact than transport, the UN believes
Shun meat, says UN climate chief
People should consider eating less meat as a way of combating global warming, says the UN's top climate scientist.
Rajendra Pachauri, who chairs the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), will make the call at a speech in London on Monday evening.
UN figures suggest that meat production puts more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere than transport.
But a spokeswoman for the UK's National Farmers' Union (NFU) said methane emissions from farms were declining.
People may not realise that changing what's on their plate could have an even bigger effect
Joyce D'Silva
Compassion in World Farming
Dr Pachauri has just been re-appointed for a second six-year term as chairman of the Nobel Prize-winning IPCC, the body that collates and evaluates climate data for the world's governments.
"The UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has estimated that direct emissions from meat production account for about 18% of the world's total greenhouse gas emissions," he told BBC News.
"So I want to highlight the fact that among options for mitigating climate change, changing diets is something one should consider."
Climate of persuasion
The FAO figure of 18% includes greenhouse gases released in every part of the meat production cycle — clearing forested land, making and transporting fertiliser, burning fossil fuels in farm vehicles, and the front and rear end emissions of cattle and sheep.
The contributions of the three main greenhouse gases — carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide — are roughly equivalent, the FAO calculates.
Transport, by contrast, accounts for just 13% of humankind's greenhouse gas footprint, according to the IPCC.
Dr Pachauri will be speaking at a meeting organised by Compassion in World Farming (CIWF), whose main reason for suggesting people lower their consumption of meat is to reduce the number of animals in factory farms.
Rajendra Pachauri, IPCC chairman.

Livestock production has a bigger climate impact than transport, the UN believes.

Dr Pachauri has chaired the Nobel Prize-winning body since 2002
Dr Pachauri has chaired the Nobel Prize-winning body since 2002
CIWF's ambassador Joyce D'Silva said that thinking about climate change could spur people to change their habits.
"The climate change angle could be quite persuasive," she said.
"Surveys show people are anxious about their personal carbon footprints and cutting back on car journeys and so on; but they may not realise that changing what's on their plate could have an even bigger effect."
Side benefits
There are various possibilities for reducing the greenhouse gas emissions associated with farming animals.
They range from scientific approaches, such as genetically engineering strains of cattle that produce less methane flatus, to reducing the amount of transport involved through eating locally reared animals.
"The NFU is committed to ensuring farming is part of the solution to climate change, rather than being part of the problem," an NFU spokeswoman told BBC News.
"We strongly support research aimed at reducing methane emissions from livestock farming by, for example, changing diets and using anaerobic digestion."
Methane emissions from UK farms have fallen by 13% since 1990.
But the biggest source globally of carbon dioxide from meat production is land clearance, particularly of tropical forest, which is set to continue as long as demand for meat rises.
Ms D'Silva believes that governments negotiating a successor to the Kyoto Protocol ought to take these factors into account.
"I would like governments to set targets for reduction in meat production and consumption," she said.
BBC Green Room logo

"That's something that should probably happen at a global level as part of a negotiated climate change treaty, and it would be done fairly, so that people with little meat at the moment such as in sub-Saharan Africa would be able to eat more, and we in the west would eat less."
Dr Pachauri, however, sees it more as an issue of personal choice.
"I'm not in favour of mandating things like this, but if there were a (global) price on carbon perhaps the price of meat would go up and people would eat less," he said. "But if we're honest, less meat is also good for the health, and would also at the same time reduce emissions of greenhouse gases."
MMVIII
Paralysed but not unconscious
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
 
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Do your soul a favor, make today the last time you eat meat!
There is nothing that indicts human beings more than the way other species are treated by the species that does know better!
Pay No Attention to That Turkey Being Slaughtered
By MARTHA ROSENBERG
Posing for photographers with her felled caribou, her child inches from its bleeding mouth, Sarah Life-Is-Precious Palin is not confused about where meat comes from.
So the turkey being slaughtered in full view of the camera as she conducted an interview at Triple D Farms in Wasilla this week probably doesn't phase her.
But most Americans don't want to see
the transformations their turkey went through to get to their Thanksgiving dinner table.
How it lived, how it was shipped, who hung the struggling bird upside down on the conveyer to transport it to the awaiting blade, et cetera — are not thoughts that improve the taste of the cranberry sauce.
Nor will the economy get so bad people will have to take jobs as
'live hangers' like Sam, not his real name, last year.
"Today I saw about 50 dead turkeys on the trucks, and about 80 live birds fell onto the floor," he writes in a diary he kept while working at House of Raeford Farms in Raeford, NC, the seventh largest turkey producer in the US.
"A worker tried to throw a turkey up to the double-sided dock from its rail side.
The bird was about to hit the rail when another worker kneed the bird and then kicked it, knocking it back down to the floor.
The worker threw the turkey a second time, but it hit the underside of the dock and dropped straight down to the cement floor for its third time that day.
The bird lay in watery feces for about two hours before being picked up and hung on the line — the turkey could keep its head up and blink; it was otherwise motionless."
Mom or Grandma may put hours of care into roasting, basting, stuffing and perfecting their butter brown bird.
But care is not the operant word at the slaughter house as workers throw, swing and 'box' at the birds as they unload trucks in video Sam shot.
One worker holds a turkey to be crushed under a truck's moving tires just for the heck of it; others pull heads and legs off turkeys for fun.
Workers insert their fingers into birds' cloacae (vaginal cavities), remove eggs and throw them at each other in a depraved game.
Because turkeys are drugged and bred to grow so quickly, their legs can't support their own weight and many arrive with broken and dislocated limbs says Sam.
When you try to remove them from their crates, their legs twist completely around, offering no resistance — useless and limp.
The turkeys must be in a lot of pain but they don't cry out, observes Sam.
In fact the only sound you hear as you hang them, he says, is the "trucks being washed out to go back and get a new load."
Most people admit they don’t want to watch laws or 40 pound Thanksgiving turkey carcasses made.
Nor do they want to watch a helpless turkey unceremoniously fed into a wood chipper behind Sarah Palin's head as KTUU TV broadcast.
But will they eat the same bird when it is passed to them on a plate next to mashed potatoes on Thursday?
You betcha.
There is nothing that indicts human beings more than the way other species are treated by the species that does know better!
Do your soul a favor, make today the last time you eat meat!
Kewe
Pig sprayed with paint for fun.

Photos From PETA Investigation Inside a Hormel Supplier

Undercover investigation at a pig factory farm that supplies piglets to be grown and killed for Hormel reveals great cruelty to animals.

Photo: PETA
Pig sprayed with paint for fun
Pig sow confined with open sore.

Photos From PETA Investigation Inside a Hormel Supplier

Undercover investigation at a pig factory farm that supplies piglets to be grown and killed for Hormel reveals great cruelty to animals.

Photo: PETA
Pig sow confined with open sore
Baby pigs heads slammed against floor.

Photos From PETA Investigation Inside a Hormel Supplier

Undercover investigation at a pig factory farm that supplies piglets to be grown and killed for Hormel reveals great cruelty to animals.

Photo: PETA
Baby pigs heads slammed against floor
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Roots of the food crisis
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
November 21, 2007
The Thanksgiving People Don't Want to See
Undercover at a Turkey Slaughtering Plant
By MARTHA ROSENBERG
The alarms rings at 3:45 AM. I reach for the ibuprofen.
Without it my hands are too sore and swollen to even close....much less hold a turkey's legs.
Wearing a pair of rubber gloves, cotton gloves and taping them doesn't help when you're banging into shackles all day.   The flesh is still raw and exposed.
I dress with the video cam that's become part of my daily outfit carefully hidden and fortify myself with enough food to get through the work day.
When we arrive at House of Raeford the trucks full of live turkeys are already waiting to be unloaded; it's not even 5:30 AM.
N o begins the diary of "Sam" — not his real name — who worked as an undercover investigator for Mercy For Animals (MFA), a national, not for profit animal advocacy organization, earlier this year while employed as a "live hanger" at House of Raeford's turkey slaughterhouse in Raeford, North Carolina.
House of Raeford Farms Inc., (HORF) headquartered in Raeford is the seventh largest turkey producer in the U.S. with seven facilities in North and South Carolina and Louisiana where it breeds, slaughters and processes chickens and turkeys.
While slaughtering turkeys is no one's first choice of work, House of Raeford has an especially checkered past. In 2003 a chlorine gas leak at HORF's Rose Hill chicken plant killed worker Bruce Glover, 39.
The following year an ammonia spill at the same plant forced the evacuation of two towns.
And last year HORF employee Pedro P. Amaya, 42, was found shot to death in the mobile home he shared with three other poultry workers; the apparent motive robbery, including theft of $60 of pain pills.
No recognition of a turkey or chicken being alive or capable of pain
A "live hanger" culture exists in slaughter plants says Sam in which there is no recognition of a turkey or chicken being alive or capable of pain.
As they unloaded trucks, workers routinely threw birds from one tier to another, letting them fall 20 feet, swung them around by their feet, "boxed" them as they hung upside down and held them under truck wheels to be crushed.
Workers pulled heads and legs off turkeys when they were stuck in crates and when they weren't — just for the hell of it.
Workers even sexually abused the birds — inserting their fingers into their cloacae (vaginal cavities) and removing eggs they would throw at each other.
Current turkey farming methods, birds that arrived already injured
Thanks to current turkey farming methods, the birds that arrived were already injured.
"There were 100 turkeys and chickens dead upon arrival today, many missing feathers with open wounds and with large sores on their feet" writes Sam in his investigator's diary on January 12, 2007.
"I saw a chicken with an abscess on her left leg about the size of a tennis ball and another chicken whose right leg was mashed to the point of bloody pulp and [she was still] hanged by both legs to go down the line."
Modern turkeys are drugged and bred to grow so quickly that their legs can't support their own weight and many arrived with legs and knees broken or dislocated says Sam.
Their legs would twist completely around, offering no resistance, limp
When you tried to remove them from their crates, their legs would twist completely around, offering no resistance, limp.
The turkeys must have been in a lot of pain reflects Sam, though they don't cry out.
In fact the only sound you hear as you hang them is the "trucks being washed out to go back and get a new load."
The same day Mercy For Animals released its undercover video, Denny's, the US' largest full service restaurant chain and a HORF turkey customer, announced it was suspending its supplier.
House of Raeford also condemned the videotaped acts and promised an investigation.
Inherently cruel, exposing animals to great pain and regularly boiling them alive
But there is no record that Hoke County prosecutor Kristy Newton launched an investigation or brought cruelty-to-animal charges.
Nor did HORF customer Arby's ever acknowledge the videotaped atrocities.
As exposes at Pilgrim's Pride, KFC's supplier, Tyson Foods, Perdue and Butterball have revealed, the system of live hanging and conveying birds through a stunner, blade and scalder is inherently cruel, exposing animals to great pain and regularly boiling them alive.
Controlled-atmosphere killing (CAK) — a system in which birds are left in their transport crates while oxygen is replaced with nitrogen or argon — is considered more humane and in use in Europe.
Am I really that hungry?
But another humane alternative is for people to look at the struggling and terrified turkeys hanging upside down and ask themselves: am I really that hungry?
Martha Rosenberg is staff cartoonist on the Evanston Roundtable.
She can be reached at mrosenberg
[at]
evmark
.org
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Chickens being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Brazilian government is sponsoring construction of a 1,100-mile roadway into dying Amazon for Mulitnational Corporations.
Much of the world's soya production goes to feed animals living in unspeakable horror in intensive farming compounds.
Animals tortured for eating by humans.
Soybean production for intensive farmed animal eating is also destroying the remaining large rainforest of Earth, the Sumatra Indonesia rainforest.
Cows being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Cows being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Cows being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Cows being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Cows being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Monday, 14 May 2007
Mars starts using animal products
Mars, Snickers and Twix chocolate bars

Some of the best-selling chocolate bars, such as Mars and Twix, will no longer be suitable for vegetarians.

Also affecting brands such as Snickers and Maltesers, owner Masterfoods said it had started to use animal product rennet to make its chocolate products.

Masterfoods said the change was due to it switching the sourcing of its ingredients and the admission was a 'principled decision' on its part.

It will now also be found in Bounty, Minstrels and Milky Way products, and the ice cream versions of all Masterfoods' bars.

'Mars products are very popular with young people and many will be shocked to discover that their manufacture now relies on the extraction of rennet from the stomach lining of young calves'

Vegetarian Society.
Mars, Snickers and Twix chocolate bars
Some of the UK's best-selling chocolate bars, such as Mars and Twix, will no longer be suitable for vegetarians.
Also affecting brands such as Snickers and Maltesers, owner Masterfoods said it had started to use animal product rennet to make its chocolate products.
Masterfoods said the change was due to it switching the sourcing of its ingredients and the admission was a "principled decision" on its part.
The Vegetarian Society said the company's move was "incomprehensible".
'Extremely disappointed'
Masterfoods said it had started using rennet from 1 May and non-affected products had a "best before date" up to 1 October.
Rennet, a chemical sourced from calves' stomachs, is used in the production of whey.
Masterfoods' decision to use non-vegetarian whey is a backward step
Vegetarian Society
It will now also be found in Bounty, Minstrels and Milky Way products, and the ice cream versions of all Masterfoods' bars.
"If the customer is an extremely strict vegetarian, then we are sorry the products are no longer suitable, but a less strict vegetarian should enjoy our chocolate," said Paul Goalby, corporate affairs manager for Masterfoods.
The Vegetarian Society said it was "extremely disappointed".
"At a time when more and more consumers are concerned about the provenance of their food, Masterfoods' decision to use non-vegetarian whey is a backward step," it said in a statement.
"Mars products are very popular with young people and many will be shocked to discover that their manufacture now relies on the extraction of rennet from the stomach lining of young calves," it added.
Sunday, 20 May 2007
Mars bars [in UK] get veggie status back
Mars said it became "very clear, very quickly" that it had made a mistake.
In just one week, more than 6,000 people bombarded the company, which produces the Mars, Snickers, Maltesers and Galaxy brands, with phone and e-mail complaints.
Forty MPs also signed a petition to voice their opposition.
"It became very clear, very quickly that we had made a mistake, for which I am sorry.
"There are three million vegetarians in the UK and not only did we disappoint them, but we upset a lot of the consumers."
Rennet is extracted from calves' stomachs and was to have been used in the ice cream versions of all Masterfoods' bars too.
Friday, 15 December 2006
High IQ link to being vegetarian
Fruit and vegetables.

Vegetarianism has been linked to better heart health
Vegetarianism has been linked to better heart health
A Southampton University team found those who were vegetarian by 30 had recorded five IQ points more on average at the age of 10.
Researchers said it could explain why people with higher IQ were healthier as a vegetarian diet was linked to lower heart disease and obesity rates.
The study of 8,179 was reported in the British Medical Journal.
Twenty years after the IQ tests were carried out in 1970, 366 of the participants said they were vegetarian - although more than 100 reported eating either fish or chicken.
Men who were vegetarian had an IQ score of 106, compared with 101 for non-vegetarians; while female vegetarians averaged 104, compared with 99 for non-vegetarians.
There was no difference in IQ score between strict vegetarians and those who said they were vegetarian but who reported eating fish or chicken.
We've always known that vegetarianism is an intelligent, compassionate choice benefiting animals, people and the environment
Liz O'Neill, of The Vegetarian Society
Researchers said the findings were partly related to better education and higher occupational social class, but it remained statistically significant after adjusting for these factors.
Vegetarians were more likely to be female, to be of higher occupational social class and to have higher academic or vocational qualifications than non-vegetarians.
However, these differences were not reflected in their annual income, which was similar to that of non-vegetarians.
Lead researcher Catharine Gale said:
"The finding that children with greater intelligence are more likely to report being vegetarian as adults, together with the evidence on the potential benefits of a vegetarian diet on heart health, may help to explain why higher IQ in childhood or adolescence is linked with a reduced risk of coronary heart disease in adult life."
Intelligence
However, she added the link may be merely an example of many other lifestyle preferences that might be expected to vary with intelligence, such as choice of newspaper, but which may or may not have implications for health.
Liz O'Neill, of the Vegetarian Society, said: "We've always known that vegetarianism is an intelligent, compassionate choice benefiting animals, people and the environment.
"Now we've got the scientific evidence to prove it.   Maybe that explains why many meat-reducers are keen to call themselves vegetarians when even they must know that vegetarians don't eat chicken, turkey or fish."
But Dr Frankie Phillips, of the British Dietetic Association, said: "It is like the chicken and the egg.   Do people become vegetarian because they have a very high IQ or is it just that they tend to be more aware of health issues?"
MMVII
Cows being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Cows being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Cows being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Cows being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Cows being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
October 27/29, 2006
Fecal Factories in the Heartland
Hogwash
By Jeffrey St. Clair
I grew up south of Indianapolis on the glacier-smoothed plains of central Indiana.
My grandparents owned a small farm, whittled down over the years to about 40 acres of bottomland, in some of the most productive agricultural land in America.
Like many of their neighbors they mostly grew field corn (and later soybeans), raised a few cows and bred a few horses.
Even then farming for them was a hobby, an avocation, a link to a way of life that was slipping away.
My grandfather, who was born on that farm in 1906, graduated from Purdue University and became a master electrician, who helped design RCA's first color TV.
My grandmother, the only child of an unwed mother, came to the US at the age of 13 from the industrial city of Sheffield, England.
When she married my grandfather she'd never seen a cow, a few days after the honeymoon she was milking one.
She ran the local drugstore for nearly 50 years.
In their so-called spare time, they farmed.
My parent's house was in a sterile and treeless subdivision about five miles away, but I largely grew up on that farm: feeding the cattle and horses, baling hay, bushhogging pastures, weeding the garden, gleaning corn from the harvested field, fishing for catfish in the creek that divided the fields and pastures from the small copse of woods, learning to identify the songs of birds, a lifelong obsession.
Even so, the farm, which had been in my mother's family since 1845, was in an unalterable state of decay by the time I arrived on the scene in 1959.
The great red barn, with it's multiple levels, vast hayloft and secret rooms, was in disrepair, the grain silos were empty and rusting ruins, the great beech trees that stalked the pasture hollowed out and died off, one by one, winter by winter.
In the late-1960s, after a doomed battle, the local power company condemned a swath of land right through the heart of the cornfield for a high-voltage transmission corridor.
A fifth of the field was lost to the giant towers and the songs of redwing blackbirds and meadowlarks were drowned out by the bristling electric hum of the powerlines.
After that the neighbors began selling out.
The local diary went first, replaced by a retirement complex, an indoor tennis center and a sprawling Baptist temple and school.
Then came a gas station, a golf course and a McDonalds.
Then two large subdivisions of upscale houses and a manmade lake, where the water was dyed Sunday cartoon blue.
When my grandfather died from pancreatic cancer (most likely inflicted by the pesticides that had been forced upon him by the ag companies) in the early 1970s, he and a hog farmer by the name of Boatenwright were the last holdouts in that patch of blacksoiled land along Buck Creek.
Boatenwright's place was about a mile down the road.
You couldn't miss it.
He was a hog farmer and the noxious smell permeated the valley.
On hot, humid days, the sweat stench of the hogs was nauseating, even at a distance.
In August, I'd work in the fields with a bandana wrapped around my face to ease the stench.
How strange that I've come to miss that wretched smell.
That hog farm along Buck Creek was typical for its time.
It was a small operation with about 25 pigs.
Old man Boatenwright also ran some cows and made money fixing tractors, bush hogs and combines.
Not any more.
There are more hogs than ever in Indiana, but fewer hog farmers and farms.
The number of hog farms has dropped from 64,500 in 1980 to 10,500 in 2000, though the number of hogs has increased by about 5 million.
It's an unsettling trend on many counts.
Hog production is a factory operation these days, largely controlled by two major conglomerations: Tyson Foods and Smithfield Farms.
Hogs are raised in stifling feedlots of concrete, corrugated iron and wire, housing 15,000 to 20,000 animals in a single building.
They are the concentration camps of American agriculture, the filthy abattoirs of our hidden system of meat production.
Pig factories are the foulest outposts in American agriculture.
A single hog excretes nearly 3 gallons of waste per day, or 2.5 times the average human's daily total.
A 6,000-sow hog factory will generate approximately 50 tons of raw manure a day.
An operation the size of Premium Standard Farms in northern Missouri, with more than 2 million pigs and sows in 1995, will generate five times as much sewage as the entire city of Indianapolis.
But hog farms aren't required to treat the waste.
Generally, the stream of fecal waste is simply sluiced into giant holding lagoons, where it can spill into creeks or leach into ground water.
Increasingly, hog operations are disposing of their manure by spraying it on fields as fertilizer, with vile consequences for the environment and the general ambience of the neighborhood.
Over the past quarter century, Indiana hog farms were responsible for 201 animal waste spills, wiping out more than 750,000 fish.
These hog-growing factories contribute more excrement spills than any other industry.
It's not just creeks and rivers that are getting flooded with pig shit.
A recent study by the EPA found that more than 13 percent of the domestic drinking-water wells in the Midwest contain unsafe levels of nitrates, attributable to manure from hog feedlots.
Another study found that groundwater beneath fields which have been sprayed with hog manure contained five times as much nitrates as is considered safe for humans.
Such nitrate-leaden water has been linked to spontaneous abortions and "blue baby" syndrome.
A typical hog operation these days is Pohlmann Farms in Montgomery County, Indiana.
This giant facility once confined 35,000 hogs.
The owner, Klaus Pohlmann, is a German, whose father, Anton, ran the biggest egg factory in Europe, until numerous convictions for animal cruelty and environmental violations led to him being banned from ever again operating an animal enterprise in Germany.
Like father, like son.
Pohlmann the pig factory owner has racked up an impressive rapsheet in Indiana.
In 2002, Pohlmann was cited for dumping 50,000 gallons of hog excrement into the creek, killing more than 3,000 fish.
He was fined $230,000 for the fish kill.
But that was far from the first incident.
From 1979 to 2003, Pohlmann has been cited nine times for hog manure spills into Little Sugar Creek.
The state Department of Natural Resources estimates that his operation alone has killed more than 70,000 fish.
Pohlmann was arrested for drunk driving a couple of years ago, while he was careening his way to meet with state officials who were investigating yet another spill.
It was his sixth arrest for drunk driving.
Faced with mounting fines and possible jail time, Pohlmann offered his farm for sale.
It was bought by National Pork Producers, Inc., an Iowa-based conglomerate with its own history of environmental crimes.
And the beat goes on.
My grandfather's farm is now a shopping mall.
The black soil, milled to such fine fertility by the Wisconsin glaciation, now buried under a black sea of asphalt.
The old Boatenwright pig farm is now a quick lube, specializing in servicing SUVs.
America is being ground apart from the inside, by heartless bankers, insatiable conglomerates, a president who lies by remote control.
We are a hollow nation, a poisonous shell of our former selves.
Cows being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Cows being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Cows being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Cows being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Nato following directive of the US
'Twenty members of my family are killed'
'10 are injured'
'The airplanes came and were bombing until 3 AM'
'In the morning, they started hitting our village with mortars and rockets'
'They didn't allow anybody to come to our help'
Pigs being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Pigs being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Pigs being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Pigs being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Pigs being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Austria has the most advanced animal protection legislation.
In May 2004, a proposed law banning the chicken "battery cage" was put to a vote in the Austrian Parliament.
It passed — without a single member of Parliament opposing it.
Austria has banned fur farming and prohibited the use of wild animals in circuses.
It has also made it illegal to trade in living cats and dogs in stores and deems killing an animal for no good reason a criminal offense.
Most important, every Austrian province must appoint an ''animal lawyer" who can initiate court procedures on behalf of animals.
      Peter Singer August 20, 2005 Boston Globe      
Calf staring at you

Photo: http://www.goveg.com/

IDA Reveals Cruelty on Chinese Fur Farms at Embassy
Consumers Warned Animals Skinned Alive in China
Washington, D.C. & San Francisco, Calif.— Holding posters reading “China: Stop Your Bloody Fur Trade,” and       members of    In Defense of Animals    (IDA)    will gather in front of the Embassy of China to expose passersby to “the true price of fur” and urge them to shun any garment made with fur.
As a result of its cheaper production, China has become the foremost fur supplier to the U.S.
Video footage of a recent investigation of fur farms in China, where millions of foxes, minks, rabbits and raccoons are killed — revealing horrific cruelty — will be screened.
A investigation of fur farms in China—where 80% of the world’s fur comes from—showed workers attempting to stun animals by repeatedly slamming them against the ground or bashing their heads with clubs.
Such unreliable methods left many animals fully conscious, visibly blinking and breathing for as long as ten minutes after the fur was ripped from their bodies.
Fur from China ends up in stores all across America.
Activists want shoppers to realize that animals suffer for all fur, even the kind inconspicuously used as trim on coats, ear muffs, or gloves.
Animals killed for fur in the U.S. fare no better.
On U.S. fur farms, the standard methods of killing animals for “ranched fur” are gassing, neck breaking, poisoning, or anal or vaginal electrocution.
The fur may even come from wild animals caught in steel-jaw traps where they suffer excruciating pain, often for days, before having their chests stomped on or their necks broken by trappers.
Beavers caught in underwater traps struggle frantically for up to 20 minutes before drowning.
“Consumers beware: Whether it’s a small bit of fur trim on a cuff or a full-length coat, buying any garment with fur supports the bloody fur trade,” says IDA spokesperson Kristie Phelps.
Many celebrated designers, such as Stella McCartney and Todd Oldham, refuse to design with fur and recently, several prominent retail chains including Victoria’s Secret and Forever 21 have pledged not to sell real fur.
For more information on IDA’s anti-fur campaign, please visit:
        www.FurKills.org        .
Pigs being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Pigs being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Pigs being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Pigs being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Pigs being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Pigs being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Pigs being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Pigs being abused slaughter factory plant.

Image: MercyForAnimals.org
Humans and their governments will do terrible things to other humans and to other animals if allowed!
Cody speaking for our farm animal companions - download video mp4

Photo: internet
Cody speaking for our farm animal companions
For the animals
A little bit of empathy for the animals
They also have a life, like your children or your family.
Eastern Grey Kangaroo called Doodlebug orphaned at birth.
Doodlebug holding tight to the teddy bear lies next to it, practices his kicking against it and cuddles the stuffed bear.
The little kangaroo has been nursed to health to live in the wild but still comes back for the occasional feeding or cuddle.
PDF and now EPub versions for small tablets and Kindle, Nook and varied e-readers
The Game - The Enslavement Dream - Manor House Oath Highway.

TheWE.cc
Part of an email I sent:
Hello,
I've just posted a new book, available free on .pdf and epub format.
The book is also available by chapter from TheWE.cc
The chapter link below has a section on animal treatment on the planet.
http://thewe.cc/contents/the-game/chapters/27-keweland.html
Scroll/Search down to:
Kewe gives a rendering of a speech ‘He makes before a Galactic Council.
Best wishes:
Kewe.
Humans and Animals — WELCOME to Abuse —Animal Abuse
The majority of these are raised in factory farms where they are stacked in cages in windowless sheds where they can't live naturally (or happily) in any sense of the word.
Debeaked and declawed without anesthesia, they feel the pain of this for the rest of their lives.
Broiler chickens are selectively bred and genetically altered to produce bigger thighs and breasts, the parts in most demand — this breeding creates birds so heavy that their bones cannot support their weight, making it difficult for them to stand.
Fed a diet deficient of iron to keep their flesh pale and appealing to the consumer, veal calves spend each day confined alone with no companionship deprived of light for a large portion of their four-month lives.
     Meet your Meat       
     Give turkeys something to be thankful for this year    ...end the tradition of cruelty     
      Investigating and preventing animal rights extremism and eco-terrorism is one of the FBI's highest priorities      
Experiments on animals
Humans and Animals — The March to Porkopolis
 
 
many other species in grave danger
 
 
 
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