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An Israel occupation soldier observes as a bulldozer destroys a water canal built by a Palestinian man on his land near the Jewish settlement of Qiryat Arba'a in Hebron in the occupied West Bank on June 8, 2009.

Israel forces arrested the landlord and demolished the canal, which was allegedly built illegally near the Jewish settlement.

Israel using war to swallow Palestine land.

More than Fifteen million US dollars is given by US taxpayers each day for the military use of Israel, which presently involves the imprisonment of the remaining segregated ' Bantustan — Apartheid ' parcels of land occupied by millions of Palestinian people.

Palestinians were forced from their homes 60 years ago from what is now called Israel into refugee camps in Gaza and the West Bank, Jordan and Lebanon.

While attempts have been made by the Palestinians to create a better life for themselves, these refugee camps have been forced upon them to this day by American Taxpayer funding, and Anglo American, Europe backing and banking for Israel that has propped up the forced 'state' of Israel for more than fifty years.

Illuminati, New World Order elite have been at the forefront in protecting European and American settler people who stole the land and continue to steal the remaining few segments of land from the Palestinians, in essence taking away from the Palestinians piece by piece this land over these many years.

Funding by the US Taxpayer for the enslavement of the Palestinian people continues to increase, estimated now considerably more than the previous 4 billion US dollars per year.

Photo boston.com/
HAZEM BADER/AFP/Getty Images
An Israel occupation soldier observes as a bulldozer destroys a water canal built by a Palestinian man on his land near the
Jewish settlement of Qiryat Arba'a in Hebron in the occupied West Bank on June 8, 2009.
Israel forces arrested the landlord and demolished the canal, which was allegedly built illegally near the Jewish settlement.
Photo boston.com
HAZEM BADER/AFP/Getty Images
US Israel Murder
Much as Israel claims that the Palestinians are violating the truce and regrouping in order to perpetrate savage acts of terror, its pleading can’t alter the facts:
Up until Israel renewed its assassinations campaign, there were no suicide bombings

Gideon Levy, Haaretz
Earth, a planet
hungry for peace

(IPC, 7/4/04)
The Israeli apartheid (land grab) wall
around Palestinian population centers.
Israel using war to swallow Palestine land.

US Israel atrocities.

Hassan Shalhoub, 4, is embraced by his mother Rabab at a relative's house in Aley, east of Beirut, August 3, 2006.

Hassan and his mother were injured in Qana during the US supplied and paid for US Israel air raid on July 30, 2006.

Hassan's three-year-old sister was among the children killed during that raid.

More than Fifteen million US dollars is given by US taxpayers each day for the military use of Israel, which presently involves the imprisonment of the remaining segregated ' Bantustan — Apartheid ' parcels of land occupied by millions of Palestinian people.

Palestinians were forced from their homes 60 years ago from what is now called Israel into refugee camps in Gaza and the West Bank, Jordan and Lebanon.

While attempts have been made by the Palestinians to create a better life for themselves, these refugee camps have been forced upon them to this day by American Taxpayer funding, and Anglo American, Europe backing and banking for Israel that has propped up the forced 'state' of Israel for more than fifty years.

Illuminati, New World Order elite have been at the forefront in protecting European and American settler people who stole the land and continue to steal the remaining few segments of land from the Palestinians, in essence taking away from the Palestinians piece by piece this land over these many years.

Funding by the US Taxpayer for the enslavement of the Palestinian people continues to increase, estimated now considerably more than the previous 4 billion US dollars per year.

Picture: REUTERS/Jamal Saidi, Lebanon
US Israel atrocities.
Hassan Shalhoub, 4, is embraced by his mother Rabab at a relative's house in Aley, east of Beirut, August 3, 2006.
Hassan and his mother were injured in Qana during the US Israel air raid on July 30, 2006.
Hassan's three-year-old sister was among the children killed during that raid.
Using war to swallow Palestinian land
Sara Roy
The Daily Star, 9/23/03
The hudna, or cease-fire, between Israel and the Palestinians is predictably over, and the horrific cycle of violence that has killed over 2,000 Palestinians and over 800 Israelis has resumed.
A major retaliatory attack was expected after Israel’s assassination on Aug. 14 of Mohammed Sidr, the head of Islamic Jihad’s military wing in Hebron.
This expected attack occurred on Aug. 19, with the suicide bombing in Jerusalem that killed 20 Israelis, six of them children.
Since then Israel has responded with brutal violence: the assassination on Aug. 21 of Ismail Abu Shanab, a leading Hamas official, and the attempted assassination of Mahmoud Zahar, a senior figure in Hamas, were perhaps the most visible manifestations of Israeli retaliation, but not the only ones.
Palestinians killed, injured and made homeless
Almost daily, Palestinians are killed, injured and made homeless.
Palestinian extremists then seek revenge on innocent Israelis, recently killing 15 people and injuring dozens more in two suicide-bombing attacks in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.
And the violence escalates.
According to Gideon Levy, a writer for the Israeli daily Haaretz, “...Much as Israel claims that the Palestinians are violating the truce and regrouping in order to perpetrate savage acts of terror, its pleading can’t alter the facts: Up until Israel renewed its assassinations campaign, there were no suicide bombings, and the two attacks (at Ariel and Rosh Haayin) last week were direct responses to the Askar refugee camp slayings (of two Hamas activists).”
It seems obvious to some analysts, at least, that by engaging in such provocative acts — which clearly do little if anything to protect the security of Israel’s citizens, and do a great deal to jeopardize it — the government of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon is deliberately trying to undermine the diplomatic process, and thereby ensure Israel’s continued occupation of Palestinian land and resources.
They slay Palestinians and expect them to exercise restraint
Put in more poignant terms, one Israeli observer recently wrote: “They slay Palestinians and expect them to exercise restraint.”
The recent decision by the Israeli government to expel Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat from Palestinian areas — if carried out — will further undermine, if not altogether destroy, what is left of the diplomatic process.
However, even during the recent cease-fire — and despite the Israeli Army’s tentative withdrawal from Bethlehem and the Gaza Strip (which has again been cut into three disconnected parts), the limited release of Palestinian prisoners and the dismantling of a few unauthorized settlement outposts — the Sharon government pursued its policy of repressive occupation, and did little to ease Palestinian suffering.
No parallel improvement occurred in Palestinian life
This was nowhere more apparent than in the continued construction of the separation wall in the West Bank.
In this regard, it is critical to understand that while the decline in terror attacks in Israel was real and visible during the cease-fire, and Israeli life improved as a result, no parallel improvement occurred in Palestinian life.
In July, during the cease-fire, the first phase of the separation wall was completed.
It is now 140 kilometers long and over 200,000 Palestinians are trapped on the “Israeli” side of the barrier.
Palestinine family
under Israel occupation
Massive destruction of physical assets
According to the Israeli Defense [sic — TheWE.cc] Ministry and other sources, during this first phase of construction, 51 Palestinian villages were isolated from most of their land, and 25 lost total access to their land, a critical problem for future economic survival.
In the village of Jayous, for example, 0.56 square kilometers out of 13 were taken to build the wall, and almost 9 additional square kilometers, two-thirds of the village’s land, now lie on the “Israeli” side of the wall.
In addition, the first phase of the wall’s construction resulted in the massive destruction of physical assets.
By December2002 , approximately six months after the wall’s construction began, the World Bank already reported extensive physical destruction of agricultural lands and assets.
In a 2002 survey conducted in 53 communities with an estimated combined population of 141,800, the damage incurred within just a few months included the bulldozing of 85 square kilometers of land and the destruction of around 0.62 square kilometers of irrigated agricultural land (including greenhouses), 37.3 kilometers of water networks, and 15 kilometers of agricultural roads.
Furthermore, according to the Palestinian Agricultural Relief Committees, 11 of the 53 communities surveyed possess approximately 241 square kilometers of land, which has been or is being isolated between the Green Line — Israel’s border with the West Bank — and the wall.
These 11 communities cultivate about 138 square kilometers, or 57 percent of this land, mostly with olive trees and field crops.
It is likely that with the wall’s construction most, if not all, of this land will be, or has already been, severed from the communities.
Occupied land Palestine boys throw stones
Camping on their land
The Israeli Defense [sic — TheWE.cc] Ministry claims that there are 41 gates allowing Palestinians access to their lands.
Right now, only landowners are permitted to pass through these gates, while farmers must apply for permits, which are extremely difficult to obtain.
Palestinian sources say that the number of gates that are actually open is around six while the United Nations reports passage through only 14.
Because accessibility is unclear, seemingly arbitrary, and ultimately dependent on the security situation, more and more Palestinians — sometimes entire families — are camping on their land, returning to their villages only once a week.
Furthermore, the weaving path of the wall, which deviates several kilometers into the West Bank at some points, has placed almost 123 square kilometers of Arab land on the Israeli side, representing a loss to Palestinians of 2 percent of the West Bank thus far.
The World Bank has estimated that when completed, the wall could annex 10 percent of the West Bank.
However, a report released by Amnesty International on Sept.7, 2003, concluded that with the wall’s completion, some 45-55 percent of the West Bank would be annexed to Israel, together with 98 percent of Israeli settlements.
Kicks back
tear gas
440,000 Palestinians would be enclosed
In addition, approximately 440,000 Palestinians would be enclosed on the “Israeli” side of the wall, cut off from their lands, their families and from other Palestinian communities.
On Aug. 21, no doubt in response to the suicide bombing in Jerusalem, Israel destroyed the entire commercial market of Nazlat Issa in one day.
This was done in order to build an “isolation barrier,” which is an extension of the wall designed to entrap and completely isolate the community and its surrounding areas.
Over 100 shops and five homes were demolished, representing the single largest demolition of buildings in years.
Lost commercial center for entire region
The Nazlat Issa market, which was previously targeted in January 2003 (when it lost almost half of its shops), was the commercial center for the entire region.
Israel has defended the wall as a necessary security measure, arguing that formidable concrete barriers will stop future suicide bombings, rather than trigger them.
The Bush administration concurs in principle, if not in fact.
For a large and growing number of Palestinians the choice is a stark and increasingly untenable one: a home without a livelihood, or a livelihood without a home.
Which would you choose?
Sara Roy is a research scholar at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Harvard University, and author of The Gaza Strip: The Political Economy of De-Development.   She wrote this commentary for THE DAILY STAR
People and The Land airdrops viewers into the universe of an occupied people, unreeling images of a new form of apartheid based on ethnicity.
Challenging U.S. foreign policy and the conventions of the documentary form itself, People and The Land examines the concrete realities of Israel's conduct in the West Bank and Gaza.
The level of U.S. support for that conduct through foreign aid, and the human cost of that aid in Palestine and the U.S.
YouTube also has it in 6 parts — part 6 deals with US involvement and payment to Israel
The waiting game
Three years ago, the acclaimed Egyptian novelist Ahdaf Soueif travelled through the West Bank to write a special report for G2.
This month, she returned for the first time
Monday November 24, 2003
The Guardian
Sunday October 19, the West Bank
I thought it was bad three years ago.   Now the landscape itself is changed.
New settlements spring up everywhere; more than 60 since I was here last.
You can watch their metamorphosis from a handful of caravans, to some Portakabins, then basic bungalows and, finally, the bristling, concrete hilltop fortress that is an Israeli settlement.
Hardly a Palestinian village exists without an Israeli settlement lowering down on it from above.
Everywhere there is construction going on — illegally: wide, Israeli-only highways to connect the settlements to each other, great mounds of rubble and yellow steel gates to block the old roads between Palestinian villages.
And there are people waiting; waiting with bundles, with briefcases, with babies, at gates, at roadblocks, at checkpoints, waiting to perform the most ordinary tasks of their everyday lives.
And there are people waiting; waiting with bundles, with briefcases, with babies, at gates, at roadblocks, at checkpoints, waiting to perform the most ordinary tasks of their everyday lives.
Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2002
The waiting game
Three years ago, the acclaimed Egyptian novelist Ahdaf Soueif travelled through the West Bank to write a special report for G2.
This month, she returned for the first time
Monday November 24, 2003
The Guardian
Sunday October 19, the West Bank
All this, Israel tells the world, is in the cause of security.
On my first morning here we drive up through the West Bank to see the biggest construction of all: Israel's "security fence."
A monster barrier of steel and concrete that separates farmers from their land and refugees from their homes.
Brute technology hacking away at a living body of land and people.
It rears up to block the sunset and the evening breeze from the people of Qalqilya.
Then spreads out to swallow great stretches of land cultivated over hundreds of years by the neighbouring villages.
This section of the barrier has been built right up close to the western side of the village of Jayyus.
From the windows of the village hall you see it slide down the hill, snake into a huge S and vanish around the farmland to the right.
Running along the inside of the barbed wire is a deep trench.
There is also a patrol road, a swept sand track to reveal footprints and an electronic fence with hidden cameras.  
Alongside this barrier, at short intervals, red signs in Arabic, English and Hebrew:
ANY PERSON WHO PASSES OR DAMAGES THE FENCE ENDANGERS HIS LIFE.
And there are people waiting; waiting with bundles, with briefcases, with babies, at gates, at roadblocks, at checkpoints, waiting to perform the most ordinary tasks of their everyday lives.
Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003
The waiting game
Three years ago, the acclaimed Egyptian novelist Ahdaf Soueif travelled through the West Bank to write a special report for G2.
This month, she returned for the first time
You cannot read the signs from here, but you can see them punctuating the acres that the mayor of this village has spent the past 40 years of his life cultivating.
From his office window he can watch — on his land on the other side of the barrier — his olive trees waiting to be harvested.
His guava trees dropping their ripe fruit on the ground.
In each of his three greenhouses, 40,000 kilograms of cucumbers are hardening.
From this village of 3,000 souls, 2,300 acres have been confiscated for the barrier.
And on the other side of the barrier another 2,150 acres, with six groundwater wells, are inaccessible.
12,000 olive trees stand unharvested, and the vegetables in 120 giant greenhouses are spoiling.
Three thousand five hundred sheep have been driven off the land.
Actually, 3,498, because one man has lost two lambs.
Three hundred families are totally dependent on their farms.
Now their harvest is rotting before their eyes and they cannot get to it.
They are feeding their flocks the husks from last year's planting.
Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003
The waiting game
Three years ago, the acclaimed Egyptian novelist Ahdaf Soueif travelled through the West Bank to write a special report for G2.
This month, she returned for the first time
There are yellow steel gates in the barbed wire but they are closed.
Farmers are busy making phone calls, some are going to see the Israeli military to demand that the gates be opened.  
Eventually, soldiers arrive.
Harvesting is a family affair so the soldiers face a crowd of men, women and children.
What they do is this.
First they collect all their identity papers.
Then they call the people out one by one.
Today they have decided that no male between the ages of 12 and 38 will be allowed on his land.
Also, no woman will be allowed unless she is over 28 and married.
So the majority of the farmers — men, women and teenagers — stand at the gate, the Israeli soldiers and the barrier between them and the harvest that is their sustenance and income for the coming year.
Two men set off to try and find a way of infiltrating their own land.
The rest make their way back to the village hall.
On the mayor's desk lie some 600 permits that appeared in the village this morning.
They are issued by the Israeli authorities and made out to individual farmers.
About half of them are in the names of people who can't use them: babies, infants, a couple of men who have been in Australia for 15 years.
But that is not the point.
The point is that the people know that if they use these permits they are implicitly accepting their terms: three months' access with no recognition of any rights to the land.
They suspect that after three months Israel will start playing games with them.
Permits like these were one of the mechanisms by which their parents and grandparents were dispossessed of their land in 1948.
What should they do?
Use the permits and try to salvage their crops and deal with the rest later?
Boycott the permits and starve?
Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003
Monday, 13 October, 2003
Alternative 'peace deal' for Mid-East
Israel using war to swallow Palestine land.

Israeli former Prime Minister Ariel Sharon
Israel's left wing has set out to prove Ariel Sharon wrong
Israeli opposition politicians and Palestinian representatives have drawn up a draft peace agreement which they regard as a viable alternative to the international plan known as the roadmap.
The unofficial plan — known as the Geneva Accord — was finalised over the weekend during a meeting in Jordan.
It comes after two years of secret negotiations, backed by human rights activists and intellectuals, and supported by Swiss diplomats.
Those involved hailed it as a blueprint to end the Middle East conflict, but Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has angrily denounced the proposal, accusing left-wing Israelis of trying to bring down his coalition government.
The BBC Jerusalem correspondent, Orla Guerin, says Mr Sharon has long maintained there is no-one to talk to on the Palestinian side.
The left-wingers have set out to prove him wrong, but she says the public on both sides has grown weary and regard the plan as no more than a wish list with no legal standing.
I wouldn't have expected anything else from the people who gave us the Oslo accords — we're still paying for them today
Foreign Minister Sylvan Shalom
The full details of the plan are due to be released when the initiative is formally adopted in Geneva next month, but sources say there is a key trade-off at its heart — Palestinians would not demand the right of return for refugees.
In exchange, they would get sovereignty over one of the most disputed religious sites in the Middle East, Jerusalem's Temple Mount, known to Muslims as Haram al-Sharif.
Negative reaction
The Palestinians involved, including former ministers, are reported to have the backing of the Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat.
They, along with their Israeli counterparts, say the accord is aimed at generating public interest and support.
The BBC's Barbara Plett, also in Jerusalem, says that the plan does signal to the Israeli public that there is an alternative to the military strategy adopted by Mr Sharon.
Israel using war to swallow Palestine land.

Palestinians protest at a funeral.

The negotiators hope the plan will appeal directly to the public.
Palestinians protest at a funeral
The negotiators hope the plan will appeal directly to the public
Although opinion polls indicate that while the majority of the Israeli public supports that strategy, there is a growing frustration with its failure to stop the violence, our correspondent says.
But members of the Israeli cabinet have been swift to condemn the plan.
"There is a roadmap, and it is not helpful to make people think there might be something else," Mr Sharon told the Jerusalem Post.
Vow to continue
However, others were far more vitriolic:
Israel's Education Minister Limor Livnat has dismissed those involved saying: "The Israelis who put their names to the plan are marginal people who represent nobody but themselves and who paid the price for that at the last elections.
"These people are the playthings of [Palestinian leader] Yasser Arafat."
That sentiment was echoed by Foreign Minister Sylvan Shalom:
"I wouldn't have expected anything else from the people who gave us the Oslo accords — we're still paying for them today," the Israeli press quoted him as saying.
He was reported to be alluding to the former Israeli justice minister and participant in the new plan, Yossi Beilin, who was a leading player in the drawing up of the Oslo accords.
However, the Palestinian officials involved in the negotiations said that they would work to ensure that the agreement became a reality.
"We are ready to campaign to win support for this plan on the Palestinian street because we want a better life and we believe we've found a way to achieve it," Palestinian MP Fares Kadura said.
 
The waiting game
Three years ago, the acclaimed Egyptian novelist Ahdaf Soueif travelled through the West Bank to write a special report for G2.
This month, she returned for the first time
The next day a Jewish Israeli woman gives me a copy of the military order on which the permits are based.
It names the West Bank land now trapped between the barrier and Israel's borders the "Seam Zone".
It states that the people who have the right to be in the Seam Zone without permits are Israelis or anyone who can come to Israel under the Law of Return.
That is, any Jewish person from anywhere in the world.
But in this district alone, 11,550 Palestinians have their homes in the Seam Zone.
"It is Nuremberg all over again," she says.
Today, the mayor is beside himself as he tries to get advice from the governor.
One man tells me that his father, who is 65, is talking of buying explosives.
"There will be no life for us anyway without the land," he says.
The fighters and the suicide bombers have generally come from the urban deprivation of the camps.
Now they will come from the villages, too.
Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003
 
The waiting game
Three years ago, the acclaimed Egyptian novelist Ahdaf Soueif travelled through the West Bank to write a special report for G2.
This month, she returned for the first time
Monday, Jerusalem al-Quds
Our taxi driver says:
"The Israelis are clever.
They build the wall and now everybody is talking about the wall.
The wall is just a wall.
It was built and it can be removed.
The real questions are the borders, the settlements, Jerusalem and the refugees."
Wednesday, Bethlehem
It is less than two months to Christmas and the streets of Bethlehem are empty.
There are no tourists, no pilgrims.
On Star Street many of the shops are closed.
The market where the neighbouring villages brought their produce to feed the town is deserted.
The closures imposed by the Israeli army mean that farmers cannot come into Bethlehem and Bethlehemites cannot leave the town.
The Monument to Peace built to celebrate Bethlehem 2000 has been demolished by Israeli tanks.
The International Peace Centre — built on land where Turkish, then British, then Jordanian police stations each stood in turn — was used by the Israeli army as its headquarters when it besieged the Church of the Nativity.
"They put up a crane with a box on top," says the friend who is taking us round, "with lights and a camera and an automatic sniper.
"And recordings.   They played terrible sounds: explosions, animals, people screaming.   All the time.   Into the church."
In the church today, an old priest dozes on a chair.
Two Franciscan monks are silently busy about the Armenian altar.
A young man — one of the besieged "gunmen" — explains the Tree of Life mosaic to a group of schoolgirls.
Three young women in hijab sit in a pew reading.
And Christ and the Madonna observe us from the walls.
The settlements of Gilo, Har Gilo and Har Homa surround the city.   Israel's military edicts are doing their best to strangle her, but Bethlehem will not lie down and die.
The Peace Centre hosts an exhibition of Nativity scenes sent in by schools from all over the world.
Annadwa, a new cultural centre, is buzzing with activity.
The staff there are young and dedicated.   They are headed by the softly spoken Reverend Dr Mitri al-Raheb, a gentle and impressive man who is fluent in many languages and has a beautiful and stylish wife.
They run an exhibition space currently featuring a Norwegian artist, a gift shop that sells its merchandise on the internet, a workshop, a state-of-the-art media centre and a theatre.   Today, Al-Raheb has been refused a permit to travel to a church meeting in Washington DC.
Every road out of Bethlehem is blocked by mounds of dirt and a checkpoint.
Imagine driving along as you have always done, between Hampstead, say, and Regent's Park, when you come upon a barrier of earth thrown up the night before.
Soldiers stand at the barrier in full battle gear, yelling at you in a strange language or a pidgin version of your own.  
They tell you to get out of your car — you're not allowed to drive here any more.
If you're allowed to carry on, you will do so on foot.
They yell at you to line up and they take their time checking your papers, questioning you — Where are you going? Why do you want to go there? Prove to me that your daughter/best friend/dentist/music teacher lives there.
A few metres away you can see the new highway that cuts across your old road.
Cars are speeding along on it, driven by men and women of that other people, the people that the soldiers belong to.
Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003
 
The waiting game
Three years ago, the acclaimed Egyptian novelist Ahdaf Soueif travelled through the West Bank to write a special report for G2.
This month, she returned for the first time
We stand at one of these checkpoints, my son taking photographs of the pedestrians waiting to be allowed to walk to the next village.
Two soldiers leave the checkpoint and stride towards us, raising their M16s to the level of our heads and shouting: "No photographs!   Give me your camera.   You!   No photos."
"Where's the notice that says no photography?"
"Everyone knows.   Give me the camera.   I can shoot you.   You take photo of me..."
"We took photos of the people waiting."
"You took photo of me.   I can shoot you..."
Are you ashamed of what you're doing?
"What's the problem?   Are you ashamed of what you're doing?   Show me the paper that says we can't take photos."   This is Tony, our Palestinian guide.   He's a film editor with an international press agency and has a US passport.
"I don't need no fucking paper.   I can shoot you, that's my paper."
"Show me the paper."
"This is Israel, I do what I like.   I can shoot you.   Here I do what I like."
"This isn't Israel.   This is the West Bank."
What is this West Bank?
"West Bank?   What is this West Bank?"   The soldier turns to his friend questioningly.
My son tries to chip in but I stamp on his foot.
"Look: in there, is Palestine.   You do what you want.   Here is Israel.   In your country, can you take pictures of secret soldiers?"
After a bit more of this Tony gets out his mobile and phones the army.
The soldiers take off their shades and turn into unhappy young men: "You think I like to do this?   You think I like to stand all day wearing this, and this, and this?   This I have to do so my mother is safe in Tel Aviv."
We suggest it might be a happier situation all round if they did this on the green line.
"Green line?   They can creep under the green line.   Look: we give them everything.   They always want more.   We give them land, we give them water, we give them electricity.   They want more..."
But you are stealing these people's land
"But you are stealing these people's land.   What about the settlements?"
"That is for the politicians.   We don't know about that.   It is the politicians."
They go back to the checkpoint.   We keep the camera.   Tony has to take our photos to the army censor for clearance within 48 hours.
Tony's family's business is on Star Street, close to Manger Square.   Four years ago he and his father pooled their savings and built a spacious home on five floors: one each for Tony and his three sisters, the parents at the top.   He is married to a diaspora Palestinian who has come back from Europe to live with him in Bethlehem.
Two weeks ago his first child was born.   I guess he is thinking a lot about what kind of life his child will have here.
On the walls in the street the portrait of Edward Said has taken its place alongside the pictures of Christine Saada, the 10-year-old girl shot in her father's car in March, and Abed Ismail, the 11-year-old boy killed by a sniper in Manger Square.
Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003
 
The waiting game
"Look at it!   Look at it!"
The arc of Tony's arm takes in the brand-new conference centre completed in 2000 and shelled by the Israelis a few months later.
The large hotel and leisure complex set up next to Solomon's Pools and also shelled by the Israelis.
And then the wall.
Here it comes, creeping up on the west of Bethlehem...
Saturday, Birzeit
Three years ago, Birzeit university was 20 minutes' drive from Ramallah.   Now, on a good day, it takes over an hour to get there.
The Israeli army has blocked the road at Surda and though today the checkpoint is not manned, people have to get out of their transport and climb on foot over the rubble.
I'm told that anyone attempting to remove rubble is shot at and that the rubble is replenished from time to time by the army.
We climb over and proceed on foot for one kilometre till the next roadblock.
Alongside the road a market has sprung up with stalls selling food, drinks and housewares.
There are horses and donkeys for hire, mule-drawn carriages and small carts pushed by men.
There are also some young volunteers with wheelchairs for the infirm and elderly.
We walk along in the crush and I'm thinking of how one of the tasks of the occupation is to push people into more and more primitive conditions.
But I am also thinking that this doesn't really matter, that it's manageable, that it's not the worst thing that can happen.
Then I hear a low but spreading murmur — "They've come, they've come" — and a Humvee appears at my shoulder.
The car is squat and broad and its windows are completely black.
It is shouting incomprehensible commands through its Tannoy as it moves in jagged, erratic bursts among the crowd.  
People step quietly out of the way but no one looks up.   This, in general, is how the people treat the Israeli army: by ignoring it as much as possible.
But I can feel in my stomach and my spine that the Humvee is here to show us all who is master, who runs this road.
Getting to class here is an act of resistance and at the university the Kamal Nasser Auditorium is full.
No one wants to talk about the occupation.   For three hours, these students and their teachers want to talk literature, theatre, music.   And they want to do it in English.
But over lunch they tell me that earlier in the day the Humvee had parked across the university gates and the Tannoy had sputtered insults.
"Provocation.   They provoke the students and hope one of them throws something then they can begin to shoot."
One young man tells me that a few days before, when the checkpoint was manned, he had been among some 200 students that the soldiers had detained there.
Gel will buy you an education
Eventually, as the students protested about being made late for class, one soldier had a bright idea: every young man who had gel in his hair could go through.
"Today," he said, "gel will buy you an education."
Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003
 
The waiting game
Sunday, Jerusalem al-Quds
Daphna Golan teaches human rights at the Hebrew University.
She takes her students out to the "field", the West Bank, to research specific topics.
The right to education, for example.   Today, they have been south of al-Khalil (Hebron).
The settlers there have been terrorising children on their way to and from school.
The kids' journey should take 20 minutes but to avoid the settlers they go by back routes which take them two hours.
I ask how old the children are.
and the settlers could not harm them
"Seven or eight.   Today they went the short way because we were with them and the settlers could not harm them but we could see that the children were very, very frightened."
I ask how the settlers terrorise them.
"They beat them.   And they are armed.   It is very strange," she says.   "You know, these are not the settlers that you imagine.   These are young people like hippies.   Long hair, bright clothes, rasta hats.   They grow organic vegetables.   They carry their guitars and their guns and they are vicious."
How many stories can I tell?
How many can you read?
In the end they all point in the same direction.
Every Palestinian I meet (and many Israelis) tells me the same thing: what Israel wants is a Palestine as free of Arabs as possible.
This is the big push, the second instalment of 1948.
Israeli policies make life unbearable so that every Palestinian who has a choice will go.
The ones left behind — the ones with no options — will be a captive population, severed from their land, from their community, caged behind barriers, walls and gates.
This is the labour that will work in the industrial zones Israel is already building near the barrier.
The Palestinians describe what is happening as ethnic cleansing.
They also say that they have lived through 1948 and there is no way they are leaving.
Try to avoid
attack by US taxpayer paid
Israel soldiers
But we will live
Dr Nazmi al-Ju'ba has the optimistic job of restoring old Arab architecture in Palestine.
"The Palestinians have many options," he tells me, smiling.
"We can live in a binational state, we can live in a Palestinian state, we can live under occupation — but we will live in any case.   And we will live as a collective; as a Palestinian nation."
Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003
 
The waiting game
Three years ago, Egyptian novelist Ahdaf Soueif travelled through the West Bank to write a special report for G2.
She has returned.
Thursday November 20, Jayyus
The farmers took the permits.
Finally, they could not bear to watch their harvest die.
And then the games began.
Separating the people who
they stole the land from
trying to slow down the process of starvation
Abdullatif Khalid, the engineer who runs the Emergency Centre at Jayyus, tells me he has just come back from a smallholding owned by four brothers.
They are struggling to feed their flock of 150 sheep.
Since the beginning of November they, like all the other farmers, have been dividing a day's food over five days.
They are trying to slow down the process of starvation.
Some of their ewes have miscarried and some of their lambs have died.
They drive their sheep to the yellow steel gate in the barrier.
They have their permits and the Israeli soldiers have no problem letting them through to their pasture.
But they refuse to let in the sheep.
They have no orders, they say, to let in sheep.
Khalid says that all the sheep owned by the village are going to starve, while their pastures lie across the Israeli security barrier.
Shouts
at US taxpayer paid
occupation forces
Can somebody intervene here?
"Can somebody intervene here?"   he asks.
"You know when birds get stuck in oil slicks or whales get beached, everybody rushes to help them.
"Maybe helping the Palestinians is complicated.
"But the world could help the sheep.
"That should be simple."
Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2003
 
The Israeli army arrived on our street at 2 am yesterday morning
For the past two weeks they have been in Ramallah every night and we knew it was only a matter of time before we would directly experience their invasion tactics.
Every morning we had discussed where they had been the night before and how much damage they had inflicted.
We had discussed whom they had arrested and who had managed to escape.
We had listened with utmost sympathy to the stories of those caught in the apartment blocks that were being searched: to the women who had no time to cover themselves decently, to their husbands taken in nightdress and without shoes.
We had listened to the explosions from neighboring areas of Ramallah and had wondered not if but when our street would be targeted.
It was on August 14 at 2 am.
The only warning we received was a phone-call 10 seconds before the army arrived, telling us that the Israelis were at the Legislative Council, 5 minutes away.
We were still up as my flat-mate was traveling at 5:30 am and we were packing and talking about visa issues and what to do if her visa was denied.
The phone call and then the horrible sound of 10 jeeps and 2 tanks and an arrest-van.
And instant spotlights and shooting and explosions.
Then rocks hurled at our door, and four Israeli soldiers at the door with their faces painted and all pointing M-16's at our heads. They were shouting at us in Hebrew, ordering us outside.
We decided that we would distract them if we could to give any poor hunted man as much time as possible to escape.
We also gave the neighbors some relief by giving voice to their anger; a privilege for which they would have been shot.
      Eliza Ernshire, Ramallah, West Bank.
      www.counterpunch.org    August 19 / 20, 2006   
The Israeli army arrived on our street at 2 am yesterday morning
The soldiers of the two jeeps at our doorstep got sick of dealing with us after 10 minutes and as flares exploded over our heads and heavy gun-fire filled the open paddock next to our house, they began to shout at us to get inside.
We went in and sat on the verandah overlooking the paddock in the spotlight of three other jeeps while soldiers raked the field with bullets.
They were shouting at the empty field in the vain and arrogant belief that some wanted man would suddenly appear and they would receive the promotion for his capture.
We were shouting back.
They said "come out!"   So we did.
We went back down the stairs and told the jeep stationed outside that we were being called by the soldiers in the next street.
They started to shout at us that the soldiers were not telling us to come out but we assured them that it must be us they were shouting at, because if any person had been hiding in the empty field he would long since have been murdered.
The soldiers were furious at our interruption and for this we were glad.
When we knew that we had pushed them as far as we could in the circumstances and realized that our knees were shaking so much that they were about to give way beneath us, we went back inside to collapse on the lounge in tears, wondering if there was actually some man bleeding to death in the field that we could not reach.
Rush Limbaugh said the photo was fake.
These crimes are committed by US supplied Israel terrorists but enabled by supporters like this hateful warmonger demagogue.
The sound of the freest creatures on earth celebrating that freedom
For another hour the jeeps and tanks circled round and round our block.  Shooting barrages of machine-gun fire and throwing explosives into every shrub and bush.
And then they departed.
They had not caught anyone and for that we were also glad.
The next hour passed in deathly quiet.
It was strange to sit in the dark and know that everyone else in the street was doing exactly the same as us.
Sitting up, sleepless and silent, afraid, waiting for the daylight to bring some normalcy back into a night-marish situation.
An hour passed.
In a half sleep I heard a sound outside the window and rushed to see what was there.
It was a strange sound and I couldn't work out what sort of devise Israel was using to produce such a singular noise.
As I stood perplexed at the window I suddenly realized that the sound was a bird singing; welcoming the first light of the day.
It was sitting in the tree outside the window, hoping from branch to branch, and singing.
Actually singing!
I wondered then at how I was becoming conditioned to the inhuman situation here, I was actually mistaking the singing of a bird for some strange weapon of Israel's.
And I realized how much I missed the simple joy of listening to the Australian "morning chorus" as we call it; the great cacophony of sound that no one can sleep through, that you curse every morning but love none-the-less.
The sound of the freest creatures on earth celebrating that freedom.
>
The sound of the freest creatures on earth celebrating that freedom
There is no freedom in Ramallah.
The West Bank and Gaza are prisons.
This is the reason many people have given for the inability of the Palestinian resistance movement to achieve even the sort of uncertain cease-fire that Hezbollah has managed to achieve in Lebanon.
People here are talking about this and are asking how Hezbollah has been able to enforce this cessation of hostilities when Palestine has been unable to do it for half a century.
Last night I talked with two Palestinian friends about this and they described to me in geographical terms the main difference between the Hezbollah resistance and that of Palestine.
"Here" one said "is Palestine" and he placed on the table two cigarette packets and two lighters forming a square.
"In the center!"
"Here!"
He pointed to one packet at the edge of the square.
"Here is Hezbollah."
"What is behind Hezbollah?"
"Nothing."
"They are fighting Israel
"And America face to face."
"Behind them is open fields."
"Syria."
"Other Arab States.
"But here is Palestine. Surrounded on all sides.
"They are not fighting only in front of them, but on every side.
"The enemy is behind them and even among them.
"This feeling of imprisonment and lack of support has ground away at the resistance movement.
"Until it has become nothing more than isolated cells of militants who are not even supported by their own families.
"Have you seen the wanted men, our freedom fighters, who are homeless?
"Even their families are afraid to associate with them.
"Have you seen them when they are alone, and the full weight of their situation hits them?
"I have seen them, crying like a child.
"This is how Israel has been winning the war against Palestine.
"Dividing the people and terrorizing them so much that they can not even trust their cousins.
"Half the population of Palestine are collaborators.
"Collaborators because they have been broken by Israeli forces."
The sound of the freest creatures on earth celebrating that freedom
So while there were celebrations in Al-Minara on the day of the cease-fire there was also a very clear awareness that Hezbollah's victory will not serve the Palestinian struggle.
Will not serve in any way except to assure them again that without the backing of Arab States this struggle is doomed to continue.
To continue in the insidious and bloody way that it has been continuing.
Continuing for many years.
And not just the backing of Arab States will help them.
As my friend concluded; "Hezbollah is indirectly supported by France and Palestinian resistance is not supported by any western nation."
So a certain sadness envelops the city of Ramallah.
A city that has been caught on the edge of a crisis which has been in the international spotlight, while experiencing nightly crisis' on a smaller scale that fail to register on any international screen.
The people of the West Bank are still prisoners, as they have been for a long time.
The only thing the Palestinians have to counter the nightly invasions and terror tactics of the Israeli forces is their song of freedom.
Still to be heard if you remember to listen for it.
The Israeli army arrived on our street at 2 am yesterday morning.
Despite the humiliation and the mistrust and the tangled web of conspiracy that exists in the West Bank and Gaza, there is still absolute dignity in the resistance of individuals here.
I do not agree with my friend who says that the resistance has been reduced to little cells of desperate militants always looking over their shoulders.
The resistance is also to be found among musicians who hold weekly concerts for free to sing the traditional heart-breaking songs of Palestine.
It is also to be found among the teachers of the fatherless or motherless children.
Those who work to daily bring some joy and learning into these children's lives.
It is even among the bus drivers who will drive impossible roads to help some passenger avoid a flying checkpoint.
And those little pure messengers of freedom have not forgotten these people.
They still wake and sing at dawn to remind of the world existing beyond war.
And oppression.
And man-made instruments of torture.
Thursday, 2 October, 2003
Israel to expand settlement
Israel using war to swallow Palestine land.

Israeli 'security' fence.

The Palestinians have launched an appeal over the fence
The Palestinians have launched an appeal over the fence
Israel has launched a tender for the construction of 550 new homes in Jewish settlements in the West Bank.
Almost all the houses will be built in the ultra-Orthodox settlement of Beitar Elit, near Jerusalem.
The announcement comes a day after the government agreed plans to build protective fences around several West Bank settlements.
About 400,000 Israelis live in the West Bank and East Jerusalem, in settlements widely regarded as illegal under international law.
The Israeli housing ministry says this decision is part of its policy to create more housing across the whole of Israel, not just the occupied territories.
As of 2003
The land taken is much greater today
Israel using war to swallow Palestine land.

West Bank: Israeli settlements

Since 1967, Israel has pursued a policy of building settlements on the West Bank.

These areas of the West Bank are linked by US Israel controlled roads not accessible to Palestine people.

These roads and settlements separate towns and villages from each other causing great hardship for Palestinians trying to reach relatives and even to shop.

There are also large tracts of US Israel reserved land with military areas or 'nature reserves' labels applied by the occupying forces.

The Israel military, including weapons: tanks, missiles, warplanes, artillery, shells, are all funded by the US taxpayer.

More than Fifteen million US dollars is given by US taxpayers to Israel each day for their military use.

Funding by the US Taxpayer for the enslavement of the Palestinian people continues to increase, estimated now considerably more than the previous 4 billion US dollars per year.

Map: BBC
West Bank: Israeli settlements
Since 1967, Israel has pursued a policy of building settlements on the West Bank.
These areas of the West Bank are linked by US Israel controlled roads not accessible to Palestine people.
There are also large tracts of US Israel reserved land with military areas or 'nature reserves' labels applied by the occupying forces.
It was, according to a spokesman, intended "to develop the communities in accordance with their needs and natural growth".
Despite international laws banning settlement in occupied areas, Jewish settlement building has expanded continually since Israel's occupation of the West Bank and Gaza in 1967, increasing rapidly in the late 1970s when the current Prime Minister, Ariel Sharon, was housing minister.
Elkana settlement
Elkana settlement
The pressure group Peace Now said the latest decision showed the housing ministry was acting as "a master planner for the settlers".
Housing Minister Effi Eitam is a member of the far-right National Religious Party, which has close links with the settlers.
Fence appeal
The Palestinian Authority has appealed to the nations that backed the now-stalled roadmap peace plan to stop any extension of the fence through the West Bank, because it will cut off Palestinian villages and towns from other Palestinian areas.
The main backer of that peace plan, the United States, had expressed concern, so for now Israel is not going to join up the new section with the old.
But the BBC's Jannat Jalil — reporting from Jerusalem — says many Palestinians are worried that Israel will delay the move until US President George W Bush is distracted by his re-election campaign.
As of 2009
More than 600 checkpoints in West Bank
Israel using war to swallow Palestine land.

West Bank: US Israel checkpoints

Occupation military force checkpoints on West Bank roads allow US Israel to monitor and control travel in much of the West Bank allowing Israel settlers only to travel on specialy built high-speed roads.

US Israel troops routinely encircle and stage attacks on Palestine population centers, the occupation forces severely restricting the movement of Palestine people.

US Israel is increasingly isolating Palestine villages and towns by snaking an Apartheid wall barrier around Israel-restricted Jewish settlements through the West Bank.

The Israel military, including weapons: tanks, missiles, warplanes, artillery, shells, are all funded by the US taxpayer.

More than Fifteen million US dollars is given by US taxpayers to Israel each day for their military use.

Funding by the US Taxpayer for the enslavement of the Palestinian people continues to increase, estimated now considerably more than the previous 4 billion US dollars per year.

Image: BBC
West Bank: US Israel checkpoints
Occupation military force checkpoints on West Bank roads allow US Israel to monitor and control travel in much of the West Bank allowing Israel settlers only to travel on specialy built high-speed roads.
US Israel troops routinely encircle and stage attacks on Palestine population centers, the occupation forces severely restricting the movement of Palestine people.
US Israel is increasingly isolating Palestine villages and towns by snaking an Apartheid wall barrier around Israel-restricted Jewish settlements through the West Bank.
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       Afghanistan — Western Terror States: Canada, US, UK, France, Germany, Italy       
       Photos of Afghanistan people being killed and injured by NATO     
 U.S. to Israel:                     
 — An apocalypse of Evil being created                     
 — 500 'bunker buster' bombs                     
       All with U.S. Money:       
       US and Israel War Crimes       
He was just shooting at children to amuse himself.
The celebration of Jerusalem day, the US missiles that rained onto children in Gaza,
and, a gathering of top articles over the past nine months
April 2004
US missiles — US money — and Palestine
March 2004
A young Palestinian man hitting an Israeli teargas bomb with his shoes away from demonstrators.
Israeli occupation soldiers killed two demonstrators and injured more than a hundred of them during anti-Wall demonstrations in the West Bank.
February 2004
A Palestinian elderly woman screaming in despair, complaining to God, as an Israeli occupation army bulldozer started to prepare her land for the construction of the separation wall in the village of Dair Qidees, near the West Bank city of Ramallah.
January 2004
Israeli occupation soldiers guarding bulldozers demolishing Palestinian homes.
A Palestinian man, perhaps who has lived in one of the homes, sits on the ground watching, his small daughters around him.
December 2003
Palestinian boys cry over the body of their father.
8 Palestinians were killed and 40 were injured,in the Rafah refugee camp in the southern Gaza Strip.
Many homes were destroyed during a savage Israeli occupation raid on the refugee camp on Tuesday.
November 2003
A Palestinian family in Jenin, moments before the Israeli occupation forces blew up their home.
October 2003
Tom Hurndall, the peace activist who was shot by Israeli occupation forces while helping to shield some Palestinian children, is declared to be brain dead.
Two Palestinian children were among about 100 Palestinian civilians injured in the Israeli air raids on Gaza Strip, which also resulted in killing 10 civilians.
September 2003
See the home blow up.
Blowing up more Palestinian homes as a collective punishment is a daily Israeli practice (paid for by US money) to control Palestinians under occupation.
The life and death of Kamala Sawalha
A student leaves her house every night, leaving her two young children at home, spends the next several hours traveling by taxi and on foot to get to the university in the neighboring town — just 15 minutes away.
Kamala wanted very badly to study — otherwise, it would be hard to understand the sacrifice she made for it.
To get up before dawn every morning, to leave the babies with their grandmother, to spend hours on the road in the heat and cold, even when pregnant, in order to get to the campus on time; to risk being shot or subjected to endless humiliations around every turn, and then to travel the whole way back — in a taxi where possible and on foot where necessary....
“Suddenly we were facing the soldiers,” he recounts. The jeep was parked on the left side of the road and its right door was open. Kamala let out a long scream. It was the last sound she would ever make.
At 11:30 A.M., they buried Kamala Sawalha in the town cemetery.
Children trying to commit suicide
Now the landscape itself has changed
More Palestinian mothers are giving birth at home because they dare not risk ride to hospital.
Punching an arab in the face.
The father went through it and now the son is going through it and no one talks about it around the dinner table.
Furer is certain that what happened to him is not at all unique.
Here he was — a creative, sensitive graduate of the Thelma Yellin High School of the Arts, who became an animal at the checkpoint, a violent sadist who beat up Palestinians because they didn’t show him the proper courtesy, who shot out tires of cars because their owners were playing the radio too loud, who abused a retarded teenage boy lying handcuffed on the floor of the Jeep, just because he had to take his anger out somehow.
 
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