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The Iraq journalist who threw his shoe, 'My Flower' to Bush, the Occupier
The Story of My Shoe
by Mutadhar al-Zaidi
Global Research — September 18, 2009
Uruknet — September 15, 2009
McClatchy — September 15, 2009
Mutadhar al-Zaidi gave this speech on his recent release:
In the name of God, the most gracious and most merciful.
Here I am, free.   But my country is still a prisoner of war.
Firstly, I give my thanks and my regards to everyone who stood beside me, whether inside my country, in the Islamic world, in the free world.
There has been a lot of talk about the action and about the person who took it, and about the hero and the heroic act, and the symbol and the symbolic act.
US government war killing weapon
Gulf south of Iraq
December 2004
The injustice
But, simply, I answer: What compelled me to confront is the injustice that befell my people, and how the occupation wanted to humiliate my homeland by putting it under its boot.
And how it wanted to crush the skulls of (the homeland's) sons under its boots, whether sheikhs, women, children or men.
Million martyrs fell
And during the past few years, more than a million martyrs fell by the bullets of the occupation and the country is now filled with more than 5 million orphans, a million widows and hundreds of thousands of maimed.
Many millions homeless
And many millions of homeless because of displacement inside and outside the country.
We used to be a nation in which the Arab would share with the Turkman and the Kurd and the Assyrian and the Sabean and the Yazid his daily bread.
And the Shiite would pray with the Sunni in one line.   And the Muslim would celebrate with the Christian the birthday of Christ, may peace be upon him.
And despite the fact that we shared hunger under sanctions for more than 10 years, for more than a decade.
US UK bombing of Fallujah
September 2004
The occupation is killing us
Our patience and our solidarity did not make us forget the oppression.
Until we were invaded by the illusion of liberation that some had.
(The occupation) divided one brother from another, one neighbor from another, and the son from his uncle.
It turned our homes into never-ending funeral tents.
And our graveyards spread into parks and roadsides.
It is a plague.
It is the occupation that is killing us, that is violating the houses of worship and the sanctity of our homes and that is throwing thousands daily into makeshift prisons.
That turn the hair of a newborn white
I am not a hero, and I admit that.
But I have a point of view and I have a stance.
It humiliated me to see my country humiliated.
And to see my Baghdad burned.
And my people being killed.
Thousands of tragic pictures remained in my head, and this weighs on me every day and pushes me toward the righteous path, the path of confrontation, the path of rejecting injustice, deceit and duplicity.
It deprived me of a good night's sleep.
Massacre of Fallujah, Najaf, Haditha, Sadr City, Basra, Diyala, Mosul, Tal Afar
Dozens, no, hundreds, of images of massacres that would turn the hair of a newborn white used to bring tears to my eyes and wound me.
The scandal of Abu Ghraib.
The massacre of Fallujah, Najaf, Haditha, Sadr City, Basra, Diyala, Mosul, Tal Afar, and every inch of our wounded land.
In the past years, I traveled through my burning land and saw with my own eyes the pain of the victims, and hear with my own ears the screams of the bereaved and the orphans.
And a feeling of shame haunted me like an ugly name because I was powerless.
Every scream of a bereaved mother
And as soon as I finished my professional duties in reporting the daily tragedies of the Iraqis, and while I washed away the remains of the debris of the ruined Iraqi houses, or the traces of the blood of victims that stained my clothes, I would clench my teeth and make a pledge to our victims, a pledge of vengeance.
The opportunity came, and I took it.
US UK War Crimes Fallujah
Loved ones, people in Fallujah killed and injured by White Phosphorus chemical and thermobaric bombs fuel-air weapons
November 2004
I took it out of loyalty to every drop of innocent blood that has been shed through the occupation or because of it, every scream of a bereaved mother, every moan of an orphan, the sorrow of a rape victim, the teardrop of an orphan.
I say to those who reproach me: Do you know how many broken homes that shoe that I threw had entered because of the occupation?
How many times it had trodden over the blood of innocent victims?
And how many times it had entered homes in which free Iraqi women and their sanctity had been violated?
Maybe that shoe was the appropriate response when all values were violated.
The killer comes bragging about victory
When I threw the shoe in the face of the criminal, Bush, I wanted to express my rejection of his lies, his occupation of my country, my rejection of his killing my people.
My rejection of his plundering the wealth of my country, and destroying its infrastructure.
And casting out its sons into a diaspora.
After six years of humiliation, of indignity, of killing and violations of sanctity, and desecration of houses of worship, the killer comes, boasting, bragging about victory and democracy.
He came to say goodbye to his victims and wanted flowers in response.
Put simply, that was my flower to the occupier, and to all who are in league with him, whether by spreading lies or taking action, before the occupation or after.
I wanted to defend the honor of my profession and suppressed patriotism on the day the country was violated and its high honor lost.
Some say: Why didn't he ask Bush an embarrassing question at the press conference, to shame him?
And now I will answer you, journalists.
How can I ask Bush when we were ordered to ask no questions before the press conference began, but only to cover the event.
It was prohibited for any person to question Bush.
Professionalism
And in regard to professionalism: The professionalism mourned by some under the auspices of the occupation should not have a voice louder than the voice of patriotism.
And if patriotism were to speak out, then professionalism should be allied with it.
US UK War Crimes Fallujah
A woman, a loved one killed by White Phosphorus chemical and thermobaric bombs fuel-air weapons
November 2004
Homeland desecrated every day
I take this opportunity: If I have wronged journalism without intention, because of the professional embarrassment I caused the establishment, I wish to apologize to you for any embarrassment I may have caused those establishments.
All that I meant to do was express with a living conscience the feelings of a citizen who sees his homeland desecrated every day.
History mentions many stories where professionalism was also compromised at the hands of American policymakers, whether in the assassination attempt against Fidel Castro by booby-trapping a TV camera that CIA agents posing as journalists from Cuban TV were carrying.
Or what they did in the Iraqi war by deceiving the general public about what was happening.
And there are many other examples that I won't get into here.
American 'intelligence' agencies
But what I would like to call your attention to is that these suspicious agencies - the American intelligence and its other agencies and those that follow them - will not spare any effort to track me down (because I am) a rebel opposed to their occupation.
They will try to kill me or neutralize me, and I call the attention of those who are close to me to the traps that these agencies will set up to capture or kill me in various ways, physically, socially or professionally.
Maybe they could hear my screams and moans
And at the time that the Iraqi prime minister came out on satellite channels to say that he didn't sleep until he had checked in on my safety, and that I had found a bed and a blanket, even as he spoke I was being tortured with the most horrific methods: electric shocks, getting hit with cables, getting hit with metal rods, and all this in the backyard of the place where the press conference was held.
And the conference was still going on and I could hear the voices of the people in it.
And maybe they, too, could hear my screams and moans.
In the morning, I was left in the cold of winter, tied up after they soaked me in water at dawn.
And I apologize for Mr. Maliki for keeping the truth from the people.
I will speak later, giving names of the people who were involved in torturing me, and some of them were high-ranking officials in the government and in the army.
US UK airstrike of Fallujah
September 2004
Americans will boast about the deceit and the means they used
I didn't do this so my name would enter history or for material gains.
All I wanted was to defend my country, and that is a legitimate cause confirmed by international laws and divine rights.
I wanted to defend a country, an ancient civilization that has been desecrated, and I am sure that history - especially in America - will state how the American occupation was able to subjugate Iraq and Iraqis, until its submission.
They will boast about the deceit and the means they used in order to gain their objective.
It is not strange, not much different from what happened to the Native Americans at the hands of colonialists.
Here I say to them (the occupiers) and to all who follow their steps, and all those who support them and spoke up for their cause: Never.
Because we are a people who would rather die than face humiliation.
And, lastly, I say that I am independent.
I am not a member of any political party, something that was said during torture - one time that I'm far-right, another that I'm a leftist.
I am independent of any political party, and my future efforts will be in civil service to my people and to any who need it, without waging any political wars, as some said that I would.
My efforts will be toward providing care for widows and orphans, and all those whose lives were damaged by the occupation.
I pray for mercy upon the souls of the martyrs who fell in wounded Iraq, and for shame upon those who occupied Iraq and everyone who assisted them in their abominable acts.
US UK invasion of Iraq
March 2003
And I pray for peace upon those who are in their graves, and those who are oppressed with the chains of imprisonment.
And peace be upon you who are patient and looking to God for release.
And to my beloved country I say: If the night of injustice is prolonged, it will not stop the rising of a sun and it will be the sun of freedom.
One last word.
I say to the government: It is a trust that I carry from my fellow detainees.
They said, 'Muntadhar, if you get out, tell of our plight to the omnipotent powers' - I know that only God is omnipotent and I pray to Him - 'remind them that there are dozens, hundreds, of victims rotting in prisons because of an informant's word.'
They have been there for years, they have not been charged or tried.
They've only been snatched up from the streets and put into these prisons.
And now, in front of you, and in the presence of God, I hope they can hear me or see me.
I have now made good on my promise of reminding the government and the officials and the politicians to look into what's happening inside the prisons.
The injustice that's caused by the delay in the judicial system.
Thank you.
And may God's peace be upon you
The translation is by McClatchy special correspondent, Sahar Issa.
Iraq Hero
Muntazer al-Zaidi, the Iraqi journalist who famously threw his shoes at George W Bush in a fit of rage, has been inundated with offers of cars, wives and money in the run up to his release from prison. 

Mr Zaidi leapt from his chair and hurled first one shoe and then the other at Mr Bush, who was joined at the podium by Iraq Prime Minister Nouri Maliki.

Muntazer Zaidi has won the adulation of millions, who believe his act of defiance did what their leaders had been too cowed to do.

His message to Mr Bush:
"This is a farewell kiss, you dog!"
"This is from the widows, the orphans and those who have been killed in Iraq."
Man throws a shoe at US President George W. Bush during a news conference with Iraq Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki on Sunday, Dec. 14, 2008, in Baghdad.

Mr Zaidi leapt from his chair at Sunday's news conference and hurled first one shoe and then the other at Mr Bush, who was joined at the podium by Iraq Prime Minister Nouri Maliki.

The man threw two shoes at Bush, one after another.

Bush ducked both throws.

The journalist's actions was echoed by Arabs across the Middle East region.
 
US invasion and bombing of Iraq 2003
Iraq child victim of US war attack
Six children in rear of car
Mother and Father in front of car shot and killed by US troops
January 2005
The soldiers standing in the dusk had called 'halt,' the story said, but no one did.

The children of Tal Afar.

US forces opened fire on a car as it approached a checkpoint in northern Iraq, killing the parents in the vehicle's front seats.

Six children were in the back of the car.

Mother and Father in front of car shot and killed by US troops.

Meanwhile, the children continued to wail and scream, huddled against a wall.  Their bodies covered with blood.

The Army’s translator later told me that this was a Turkoman family and that the teenaged girl kept shouting, 'Why did they shoot us?   We have no weapons!   We were just going home!'

From the pavement I could see into the bullet-mottled windshield more clearly, the driver of the car, a man, was penetrated by so many bullets that his skull had collapsed, leaving his body grotesquely disfigured.

A woman also lay dead in the front, still covered in her Muslim clothing and harder to see.
US forces opened fire on a car as it approached a checkpoint in northern Iraq, killing the parents in the vehicle's front seats.
Six children were in the back of the car.
Meanwhile, the children continued to wail and scream, huddled against a wall.  Their bodies covered with blood.
The Army’s translator later told me that this was a Turkoman family and that the teenaged girl kept shouting, 'Why did they shoot us?   We have no weapons!   We were just going home!'
From the pavement I could see into the bullet-mottled windshield more clearly, the driver of the car, a man, was penetrated by so many bullets that his skull had collapsed, leaving his body grotesquely disfigured.
A woman also lay dead in the front, still covered in her Muslim clothing and harder to see.
  uruknet.info
  اوروكنت.إنفو
    informazione dall'iraq occupato
information from occupied iraq
أخبار منالعراق المحتلة
US Troops Open Fire On Fallujah Students at Shoe Rally
Jason Ditz
December 17, 2008
Protest in Fallujah for release of Muntathar
December 2008
Besides making an international celebrity out of Iraqi reporter Muntadar al-Zeidi, the now infamous shoe-throwing incident is cropping up in surprising ways across Iraq, where a population beaten and exhausted from years of war is once again finding its voice against the US military presence and the Iraqi government seen as its enablers.
The city of Fallujah was one of the hardest hit in all of Iraq, nearly destroyed earlier in the war.
When students at the city’s university
Iraqi reporter Muntadar al-Zeidiheld an impromptu rally in support of the jailed Zeidi, US soldiers were quick on the scene.
The students raised shoes and some of them threw rocks, prompting the troops to open fire in an attempt to disperse the crowd.
One student was wounded, shot in the foot according to his doctor.
Separate Incident Reported at Baghdad Bridge as Public Increasingly Shows Unrest
Reporter Mohammed al-Dulaimy Iraqi reporter Muntadar al-Zeiditells another story at the July 14 Bridge in Baghdad.
The bridge is closed to the public several times a day while official convoys pass through... just another reality in the war-torn city.
But today when Iraqi soldiers arrived and attempted to close the bridge, angry drivers refused.
They continued on their way, honking angrily when the soldiers got in their way.
Predictably, the [puppet regime Iraq] soldiers drew their rifles and began firing.
Surprisingly, traffic continued through the square and across the bridge.
The horns of tens of cars were loud
Angry drivers yelled at soldiers
Not even when the soldiers brandished their rifles at the cars would the drivers stop
There were shots in the air, but the vehicles continued on
The military saw, for the first time I think, mass anger
"Orphans, widows or any Iraqi tragedy, he always wished to see any American officials, Rumsfeld or Condoleezza Rice, to spit on their faces or hit them with his shoe."
"He didn't expect that he would find Bush in front of his face."
"The feelings of the family are mixed between happiness and sadness."
"Happy with what our brother did and sad because of what happened with him after that."
Audai al Zaidi, elder brother of Muntathar al Zaidi
  uruknet.info
  اوروكنت.إنفو
    informazione dall'iraq occupato
information from occupied iraq
أخبار منالعراق المحتلة
Iraq shoe-thrower in Greece for medical treatment
AFP
September 17, 2009
June 2008
ATHENS — The Iraqi journalist jailed for throwing his shoes at former US president George W. Bush has arrived in Greece following his release, Iraqi diplomats said Thursday.
TV reporter Muntazer al-Zaidi went to Greece for medical treatment after suffering torture while in prison, his family said.
He was released on Tuesday after being jailed for one year for launching shoes at Bush on December 14 during a Baghdad press conference.
The embassy said that he had arrived Wednesday in Greece but it had no contact with him and no further information on his stay.
However his employer, Al-Baghdadia TV station in Baghdad, and a family member said he was in Greece for medical treatment.
Zaidi said he suffered electric shocks and simulated drowning while in custody.
A family member said he suffers frequent headaches after being injected with unknown chemicals by jailers.
Zaidi was initially sentenced to three years for assaulting a foreign head of state, but had this reduced to one year on appeal.
His sentence was cut further for 'good behaviour'.
 
 
 
 
  uruknet.info
  اوروكنت.إنفو
    informazione dall'iraq occupato
information from occupied iraq
أخبار منالعراق المحتلة
THE SCIENCE OF EVIL
ITS USE FOR POLITICAL PURPOSES
CarolynBaker.Org
February 15, 2007
War criminal Blair speaking before other war criminals including two thirds of the British Labour Party in the UK parliament.

Blair admitted lying about the number of bodies in mass graves

Photo: www.uruknet.de/
War criminal Blair admitted to lying about the number of bodies in mass graves
Our government wouldn’t harm us; our government has our best interests at heart
Canada’s Red Pill press has recently published psychologist Andrew M. Lobaczewski’s book Political Ponerology (Red Pill Press, Canada, 1998 and 2006) in which the author expounds on his observations that during his years of clinical work in Poland, he noticed a high correlation between acts that most people would label as "evil" and various pathologies.
Birth defects due to Depleted Uranium use in Iraq.

The US and UK military have continued to use depleted uranium weapons despite warnings from scientists that it poses a potential long-term cancer risk to civilians.

A former senior scientist with the United Nations has told the BBC that studies showing that it was carcinogenic were suppressed from a seminal World Health Organisation report.

The US fired 320 tons in Gulf War I — and 2,000 tonnes in Gulf War II.

When you breathe in the dust the deeper it goes into the lung the more difficult it is to clear.

The particles that dissolve pose a risk — part radioactive — and part from the chemical toxicity in the lung — and then later as that material diffuses into the rest of the body, and into the blood stream a potential risk at sites like the bone marrow for leukaemia, the lymphatic system and the kidney.

These bombs came down, very big explosions, deep into the earth, threw a lot of material up into the air as a smoke plume flashed odd colors. 

Then a smoke plume full of dust, dirt and debris — and of course we found out later was uranium particles — came across the village.

Photo: http://eldib.wordpress.com/
Birth defects due to Depleted Uranium use in Iraq.
The US and UK military have continued to use depleted uranium weapons despite warnings from scientists that it poses a potential long-term cancer risk to civilians.
A former senior scientist with the United Nations has told the BBC that studies showing that it was carcinogenic were suppressed from a seminal World Health Organisation report.
The US fired 320 tons in Gulf War I — and 2,000 tonnes in Gulf War II.
"When you breathe in the dust the deeper it goes into the lung the more difficult it is to clear.
"The particles that dissolve pose a risk — part radioactive — and part from the chemical toxicity in the lung — and then later as that material diffuses into the rest of the body, and into the blood stream a potential risk at sites like the bone marrow for leukaemia, the lymphatic system and the kidney."
"These bombs came down, very big explosions, deep into the earth, threw a lot of material up into the air as a smoke plume flashed odd colors.
"Then a smoke plume full of dust, dirt and debris — and of course we found out later was uranium particles — came across the village."
Evil adjusted for political purposes
The most apt diagnostic labeling of these individuals in modern psychological jargon would be sociopathic, the most important characteristic of which is the seeming absence of a conscience or empathy in relation to other living beings.
Lobaczewski and some of his Eastern European colleagues working under Soviet rule decided to take this study to a higher level and researched how sociopathy was playing out in government, in business, and in other social groups.
Political ponerology (originating from the Greek word for evil, poneros) is a science on the nature of evil adjusted for political purposes which ultimately on a larger scale results in a pathocracy.
The research indicates that sociopaths are found in all races, ethnicities, and creeds, and that no group is immune to them.
Sociopaths constitute, according to the author, about 6% of the population of any given group.
Red Pill’s editor states that, "Political Ponerology is a book that offers a horrifying glimpse into the structure underlying our governments, our biggest corporations, and even our system of law."
After I read the book, a number of nagging questions about the policies and practices of government and corporate officials began to answer themselves in that Lobaczewski’s analysis goes to the heart of why the United States government has become a criminal enterprise hell bent on dominating the world and annihilating vast quantities of human beings globally and domestically.
When I first began the book I was more than a little put off by Lobaczewski’s European style of writing — his wordiness and his succinctness - challenged approach.
US Massacre Najaf - Three bodies.

200 pilgrims was on its way, on foot, to celebrate Ashura in Najaf.

From the Hawatim tribe, which lives between Najaf and Diwaniyah to the south, the pilgrims arrived in the Zarga area, one mile from Najaf at about 6 in the mornong on Sunday.

Leading the procession was the chief of the tribe, Hajj Sa'ad Sa'ad Nayif al-Hatemi, and his wife who were driving in their 1982 Super Toyota sedan because they could not walk.

When they reached an Iraq puppet army checkpoint the puppet army troops paid by the US opened fire, killing Mr Hatemi, his wife and his driver, Jabar Ridha al-Hatemi.

The tribe, fully armed because they were travelling at night, then assaulted the checkpoint to avenge their fallen chief.

American helicopters then arrived.

The tribesmen went on firing and a US helicopter was hit and crashed killing two crewmen.

The tribesmen say they do not know if they hit it or if it was brought down by friendly fire.

The US aircraft launched an intense aerial bombardment in which 120 tribesmen and local residents were killed by 4 on Monday the next day.

The messianic group led by Ahmad al-Hassani, which was already at odds with the Iraq puppet government in Najaf, was drawn into the fighting because it was based in Zarga.

The Hawatim and Khaza'il tribes are opposed to the Supreme Council for Islamic Revolution in Iraq (SCIRI) and the Dawa Party, who both control Najaf and make up the core of the puppet Baghdad government.

No attempt was made by the US military to analyse or stabilize the situation, they just kept attacking using overhead air power.

Later the presence of the group led by Ahmad al-Hassani provided a convenient excuse by the US military for what was in effect a massacre by the US which continued through the day into the night and continued on until dawn.

263 people were killed in the US attacks.

210 people were wounded in the US attacks.

Photo: Najaf Governor Office
US Massacre Najaf
— Three bodies of 263 who were killed by a US attack
More than 200 pilgrims were on their way, on foot, to celebrate Ashura in Najaf.
The pilgrims from the Hawatim tribe, which lives between Najaf and Diwaniyah to the south, arrived in the Zarga area, one mile from Najaf, at about 6 in the morning on Sunday.
Leading the procession was the chief of the tribe, Hajj Sa'ad Sa'ad Nayif al-Hatemi, and his wife who were driving in their 1982 Super Toyota sedan because they could not walk.
When they reached an Iraq puppet army checkpoint the puppet army troops paid by the US opened fire, killing Mr Hatemi, his wife and his driver, Jabar Ridha al-Hatemi.
The tribe, fully armed because they were travelling at night, then assaulted the checkpoint to avenge their fallen chief.
American helicopters then arrived.
The tribesmen went on firing and a US helicopter was hit and crashed killing two crewmen.
The tribesmen say they do not know if they hit it or if it was brought down by friendly fire.
The US aircraft launched an intense aerial bombardment in which 120 tribesmen and local residents were killed by 4 on Monday the next day.
The messianic group led by Ahmad al-Hassani, which was already at odds with the Iraq puppet government in Najaf, was drawn into the fighting because it was based in Zarga.
The Hawatim and Khaza'il tribes are opposed to the Supreme Council for Islamic Revolution in Iraq (SCIRI) and the Dawa Party, who both control Najaf and make up the core of the puppet Baghdad government.
No attempt was made by the US military to analyse or stabilize the situation, they just kept attacking using overhead air power.
Later the presence of the group led by Ahmad al-Hassani provided a convenient excuse by the US military for what was in effect a massacre by the US which continued through the day into the night and continued on until dawn.
263 people were killed in the US attacks.
210 people were wounded in the US attacks.
As we continued to stage various coups around the world
Nevertheless, as I kept reading, and I must admit, struggling with his sentences, I grew increasingly grateful for the book and the friend who gave it to me.
As a result, a few of the author’s fundamental concepts cry out to be shared, and this article is an attempt to do just that.
Lobaczewski first points out that societies are the most vulnerable to evil during good times.
"During good times," he writes, "people progressively lose sight of the need for profound reflection, introspection, knowledge of others, and an understanding of life’s complicated laws." (P.85)
Certainly, in my lifetime, I have not witnessed an American society willing to reflect and wrestle with the complexities of existence since the Vietnam War.
Although much of the protest and activism of the sixties was naively myopic, the tension and angst of the era drove a majority of individuals in the United States to look deeper within themselves than they otherwise might have.
Men holding handfuls of Flechettes used by the U.S. military in Fallujah.

Photo taken May 19, 2004. 

Photo: www.dahr.org/
Men holding handfuls of Flechettes used by the U.S. military in Fallujah, Iraq
Photo taken May 19, 2004.
Two million Iraqis who died due to U.S.-imposed embargo
Following upon the heels of the war, of course, came Watergate, and further confirmation that governments always betray their own citizens and always lie about doing so.
Then as the ME-generation seventies offered us the deceptions of peace and honest government, the groundwork for the current horrors domestically and internationally were being laid.
America was war-weary, and smarting from the wounds of Watergate, acting out Lobaczewski’s assertion that "During good times, the search for truth becomes uncomfortable because it reveals inconvenient facts." (85)
On the other hand, he states, "Suffering, effort, and mental activity during times of imminent bitterness lead to progressive, generally heightened, regeneration of lost values, which results in human progress." (P.87)
Conversely, "The cycle of happy, peaceful times favors a narrowing of the world view and an increase in egotism…."
Flechettes used by U.S. military, displayed in Saigon
Flechettes used by U.S. military, displayed in Saigon "War Crimes Museum," as referred to by locals
Well, Jung said it long before Lobaczewski: Consciously analyzed suffering produces growth while letting nothing roll besides the good times produces stagnation and delusion.(87)
Perhaps no generation in American history has ever been so vulnerable to egotism as that of the seventies.
It became known as the ME generation for a reason—not only because Americans became more personally narcissistic but also because internationally, in spite of losing our first war and weathering the Watergate scandal, we proceeded to demonstrate our superiority as we continued to stage various coups around the world and wage economic warfare on developing nations, setting the stage for Reagan’s ascent to power in the eighties and the polarization of ourselves as the savior in contrast to the "evil empire" of anyone else who dared to disagree.
It is exactly at those times of ego-delirium that nations render themselves deaf, dumb, and blind to conscience-less sociopaths who seduce them into policies and practices that are lethal for themselves and the rest of the world.
Lack of reflection by definition produces human beings devoid of discernment.
One enormous problem I have with Lobaczewski’s elucidation of his theory is his use of "normal" to describe people who are not sociopaths.
I wish he had used a different term since "normal" is so amorphous and laden with the naïve assumption that there is such a thing as a human being who is not dysfunctional in at least one aspect of his/her life.
Nevertheless, he emphasizes that so-called "normal" individuals cannot comprehend the mind or behavior of the sociopath and are thus especially vulnerable to being harmed by them—hence the principal reason for writing a book on Ponerology, namely, to educate non-sociopaths about the pathology.
The author uses the term "spellbinders" to describe psychological snake charmers who appear to be saviors, enlightened thinkers/politicians, even activists who present themselves as possessing insights based on research uniquely carried out by themselves or information gained through extraordinary channels to which no one else has access. This could also apply to cult leaders like Warren Jeffs and Jim Jones.
US war machine
US Massacre Najaf
January, 2007
The U.S. government couldn’t possibly have orchestrated the 9/11 attacks?
Yet, the author warns the reader that our own unconscious processes can cause us to block out the "red flags" that may arise in dealing with sociopaths.
"Unconscious psychological processes outstrip conscious reasoning, both in time and in scope, which makes many psychological phenomena possible." (152)
Thus the denial that prohibits some individuals from seeing the darkest truths of what a sociopath is trying to promote, i.e., "Our government wouldn’t harm us; our government has our best interests at heart; no president could get away with that; the rule of law is still at work in America; fascism can’t happen here; the U.S. government couldn’t possibly have orchestrated the 9/11 attacks; if 9/11 were orchestrated by the U.S. government, too many people would have been involved for it to remain a secret", and on and on ad infinitum.
Lobaczewski asserts that every society should teach its members proper thinking skills and how to detect the red flags of sociopathy.
Teaching critical thinking skills in the educational process is one step in that direction, but in America’s No Child Left Behind gargantuan dumbing down project, even this first step is overwhelmingly absent.
The author states that "an ever-strengthening network of psychopathic and related individuals gradually starts to dominate, overshadowing the others." (192)
Small pathological minority takes control
This situation rapidly devolves into a pathocracy or a system wherein a small pathological minority takes control over a society of normal people. (193)
The book’s editor, Laura Knight-Jadczyk, in her footnotes does not hesitate to name Karl Rove, Dick Cheney, and Donald Rumsfeld, under the tutelage of Leo Strauss, as principal players in America’s twenty-first century pathocracy.
Tragically, according to the author, "Pathocracy progressively paralyzes everything [and]…progressively intrudes everywhere and dulls everything."(195)
If this all sounds very grim, and it is, Lobaczewski encourages us by emphasizing that, "If the ponerogenic activity of pathological factors—deviant individuals and their activities—is subjectged to conscious controls of a scientific, individual, and societal nature, we can counteract evil as effectively as by means of persistent calls to respect moral values." (180)
In other words, the author insists, crusading for moral values alone, can neither prevent nor expose ponerogenic activity.
In fact, he asserts, it can exacerbate such activity by distracting attention from the most ghastly forms of evil to that which is not evil at all or presents with a more complex and less blatant quality.
We have only to witness the ideology and rhetoric of the religious right in this country to observe a stellar example of the latter.
Professing to be a "culture of life" it is implacably obsessed with death, apocalyptic violence, hell fire and brimstone.
It serves no purpose, essentially, in the current milieu but to foster and perpetuate pathocracy.
Political Ponerology is an invaluable work that every human being striving to become conscious, should read, not only for its expose of the pathology of the individuals currently in control of the United States government, but also the light it may shed on individuals closer to home, some of whom may be friends, fellow-activists, business or civic leaders.
The book’s purpose is not to incite paranoia, but to cultivate discernment and buttress our trust of our innate intuition in order to navigate the daunting manifestations of evil that surround us in the twenty-first century.
"This is from the widows, the orphans and those who have been killed in Iraq."
US flags are burnt during a protest against a visit by US President George W. Bush and the arrest of an Iraqi journalist in Baghdad.
The Iraq puppet government faced mounting calls to release the journalist who hurled his shoes at George W. Bush, an action branded shameful by the govt but hailed in the Arab world as an ideal parting gift to the US president.
The journalist's actions was echoed by Arabs across the Middle East region.
"He [George Bush] deserves to be hit with 100, not just one or two shoes. Who wants him to come here?" said a man in Baghdad.
Thousands of Iraq people are demanding the release of a local TV reporter, Muntadar al-Zaidi, who threw his shoes at US President George W Bush at a Baghdad news conference.
Cairo-based al-Baghdadiya TV channel said Mr Zaidi should be freed because he had been exercising freedom of expression — something which the Americans always boast
Crowds gathered in Baghdad calling for hero Muntadar al-Zaidi to be freed from custody.
The Iraqi-owned TV station, al-Baghdadiya, called for the release of their journalist, stating:
'Any measures against Muntadar will be considered the acts of a dictatorial regime.'
The programming director for al-Baghdadiya, Muzhir al-Khafaji, described the journalist as a 'proud Arab and an open-minded man'.
He said he was afraid for Mr Zaidi's safety, adding that the reporter had been arrested by US officials twice before.
'We fear that our correspondents in Iraq will be arrested.   We have 200 correspondents there,' he added.
A leading human rights group accused the Iraq main criminal court of failing to meet basic international standards of justice.
The New York-based group said torture and abuse of prisoners before trial appeared common, and legal representation was often ineffectual.
The group called on Iraq to take immediate steps to protect detainees from torture, and ensure they had access to proper defence and received a prompt hearing.
Forever you will be remembered, o hero of your people!
Tears of Rage; Tears of Grief
Written by Chris Floyd
Thursday 14 December 2006
Mass death returns to Ishaqi.
I. Rashomon in Iraq
Mass death came again to the Iraqi town of Ishaqi last Friday.
Nine months after an American raid that killed 11 civilians, including five children under the age of five, another ground and air assault on suspected insurgents in the area left behind a pile of corpses, including at least two children.
As with the earlier incident, Friday's attack has produced conflicting stories of what really happened, but the end result is clear: a multitude of grieving, angry Iraqis further embittered against the American occupation.
The latest Ishaqi attack — with "only" 20 fatalities — is of course a mere sideshow in the garish carnival of death that is Iraq today.
But in many respects it is a microcosm of the largely unseen reality of the war that grinds on day after day behind the obscuring fog of political rhetoric that enshrouds both Washington and Baghdad.
In this return to Ishaqi, we find many of the elements that have kept Iraq an open, gaping wound with little chance for healing: constant airstrikes on populated civilian areas, iron-fisted house raids, propaganda ploys, dubious intelligence, disdain for the locals — and the employment of mysterious units that may be blended with government-run (even American-run) death squads.
What happened?
So what happened on December 9 in the village of Taima, in the Ishaqi district, on the shores of Lake Tharthar?
The official US military version states that unidentified "Coalition Forces" entered the village shortly after midnight and targeted a location "based on intelligence reports that indicated associates with links to multiple al-Qaeda in Iraq networks were operating in the area."
During a search, they took heavy fire from a nearby building.
Returning fire, they killed "two armed terrorists [Resistance members]" but couldn't quell the attack, so they called in an airstrike that killed "18 more armed terrorists [Resistance members]," including two women.
Of the latter, the military press release said that "al-Qaeda in Iraq has both men and women supporting and facilitating their operations, unfortunately."
The unspecified raiders then uncovered a cache of terrorist [Resistance member] arms which they photographed and subsequently destroyed.
Long been armed to the teeth
The identification of the victims as terrorists [Resistance members] was made through a "battle damage assessment," said US military spokesman Lt. Col. Christopher Garver.
"If there is a weapon with or next to the person or they are holding it, they are a terrorist [Resistance member]," he said.
Yet as Bloomberg News points out, almost all Iraqis keep a gun — or several guns — in their home.
Indeed, the whole nation has long been armed to the teeth, with even heavy weaponry in private hands throughout the reign of Saddam Hussein.
In fact, as Patrick Cockburn notes in his excellent new book, The Occupation, Saddam once had to resort to a national buy-back scheme to try to reduce the level of heavy weapons on the streets.
One tribe even showed up with three tanks, "which they were prepared to turn over for a sizeable amount of money."
This doesn't mean that the official report of the Ishaqi incident is necessarily wrong, of course.
But neither is it a fact that every dead Iraqi found near a weapon in a bombed-out private house is a terrorist. [Resistance member]
American spokesmen provided two photos of weapons caches they said were recovered from the airstrike.
One photo showed a set of damaged, battered, dust-covered AK-47s, pistols, grenade launchers and ammo clips.
The other showed a notably pristine-looking set of "explosives, blasting caps and suicide belts," as the military press release described them.
Garver firmly refused to identify the troops involved in the raid; he wouldn't even say if they were American, Iraqi, or from some other Coalition ally, the Daily Telegraph reports.
Units we don't talk about.
"There are some units we don't talk about," he said.
But the conclusions of the official report were unequivocal: 20 terrorists [Resistance members] killed, no collateral damage — an exemplary feat of arms that brought the Coalition "another step closer to defeating al-Qaeda [Iraq Resistance] in Iraq and helping establish a [']safe and peaceful['] Iraq."
But local officials from the US-backed Iraqi government had a different view: they said the raid was a bloodbath of innocent civilians.
Ishaqi mayor Amir Fayadh said that 19 civilians were killed by the airstrikes that destroyed two private homes.
Fayadh said that the victims included seven women and eight children.
An official in the regional government of Salahuddin said six children had been killed.
All Iraqi officials agreed that the victims were mostly members of the extended families of two brothers in the town, Muhammad Hussein al-Jalmood and Mahmood Hussein al-Jalmood, the New York Times reports.
Both Fayadh and Abdullah Hussein Jabbara, deputy governor of Salahuddin, insisted that the families had nothing to do with al-Qaeda.
Locals claimed that the terrorist [Resistance] paraphernalia at the site, such as the "suicide belts," had been planted.
American officials denied the charge.
Soon after the attack, reporters and photographers from the Associated Press and Agence France-Presse arrived on the scene.
They took pictures, shot video, and talked to grieving members of the al-Jalmood family.
Local police gave them the names of at least 17 of the victims, which indicated they were from the same family.
The names of at least four women were among them.
Many of the bodies had been charred and twisted beyond recognition; some were "almost mummified," AP reports.
However, AFP videotaped at least two children among the dead.
When shown the pictures later, Garver said: "I see nothing in the photos that indicates those children were in the houses that our forces received fire from and subsequently destroyed with the airstrike."
He did not speculate on where the dead children being mourned by family members after being pulled from the rubble of the bombed-out houses might have come from otherwise.
Perhaps the al-Jalmoods kept them in cold storage for just such a propaganda opportunity?
 
II.   Seeding Insurgency [Resistance] and Civil War
The next day, hundreds of angry residents from the Ishaqi area carried the raid victims to their graves while firing weapons and "condemning the mass killing by the occupation forces," as Reuters reports.
But the story quickly faded from the newswires, replaced by more Beltway jawboning about the Baker Group report and rampant rumors of Iraqi leader Nouri al-Maliki's impending ouster.
Yet many questions about the Ishaqi incident remain.
First, how to reconcile the wildly different accounts of the US military and the officials of the US-backed Iraqi government?
Someone is not telling the whole truth.
Either there were only 20 dead "armed terrorists" [Iraq Resistance] at the scene — with only two women and no children — or else the raid did indeed kill several civilians, including at least two children, by calling down an airstrike on a residential area that took out belligerents and non-combatants alike.
(That shots were exchanged in the darkness of the midnight raid is not in dispute.)
The refusal to identify the unit involved is also puzzling, especially in the terms Garver used: "There are some units we don't talk about."
This was not a general refusal to identify specific military outfits to avoid possible reprisal; in any case, local residents would certainly know which Coalition units were quartered in the vicinity.
The phrase seemed to refer to a more shadowy force: perhaps the "Iraqi special forces unit" created and paid for by the Bush administration to act outside the control of "sovereign" Iraqi government, as Spencer Ackerman noted in The New Republic last week.
They cannot fire him
This freebooting secret police unit was formed under the "interim government" of CIA asset and former anti-Saddam terrorist chieftain Iyad Allawi.
It is commanded by General Muhammed Shahwani, who made it clear to Allawi's successors, the "democratic" leaders of "sovereign" Iraq, Ibrahim al-Jafari and Maliki, that they cannot fire him.
The Americans also gave him control of the captured files of Saddam's hated Muhkabarat security agency.
The Los Angeles Times reports that Shahwani's "special forces" have "participated in operations against suspected Shiite death squad members and high-level Iraqi insurgents."
As Steve Gilliard and others have noted, these "special forces" likely grew out of the Iraqi militia that the Bush administration formed in the summer of 2003, as the insurgency began to grow.
Bush also reopened Saddam's infamous Abu Ghraib prison at the same time, despite solemn promises to destroy it.
As I noted in the Moscow Times in August of that year:
Here's a headline you don't see every day:
"War Criminals Hire War Criminals to Hunt Down War Criminals."
Perhaps that's not the precise wording used by the Washington Post this week, but it is the essence of its story about the Bush Regime's new campaign to put Saddam's murderous security forces on America's payroll.
Yes, the sahibs in Bush's Iraqi Raj are now doling out American tax dollars to hire the murderers of the infamous Mukhabarat and other agents of the Baathist Gestapo - perhaps hundreds of them.
The logic, if that's the word, seems to be that these bloodstained "insiders" will lead their new imperial masters to other bloodstained "insiders" responsible for bombing the UN headquarters in Baghdad - and killing another dozen American soldiers while Little George was playing with his putts during his month-long Texas siesta.
Naturally, the Iraqi people - even the Bush-appointed leaders of the Potemkin "Governing Council" - aren't exactly overjoyed at seeing Saddam's goons return, flush with American money and firepower.
And they're certainly not reassured by the fact that the Bushists have also re-opened Saddam's most notorious prison, the dread Abu Ghraib, and are now, Mukhabarat-like, filling it with Iraqis - men, women, and children as young as 11 - seized from their homes or plucked off the street to be held incommunicado, indefinitely, without due process, just like the old days.
As the Times reports, weeping relatives who dare approach the gleaming American razor-wire in search of their "disappeared" loved ones are referred to a crude, hand-written sign pinned to a spike:
'No visits are allowed.
'No information will be given and you must leave.'
Perhaps an Iraqi Akhmatova will do justice to these scenes one day.
Salvador Option
These groups were later joined by homegrown militias taken up by American commanders and given arms and money to do the shadowlands "wet work" that US forces could not do.
This was the "Salvador Option" that American officials began discussing publicly in early 2005: emulating the death squads backed by the Reagan and Bush I administrations in their "counterinsurgency" proxy wars in Central America during the 1980s, when tens of thousands of people were murdered.
In fact, Bush II brought in US veterans of the death squad days to train the new Iraqi militias.
Bush also provided a "state-of-the-art command, control and communications center" to coordinate the operation of his Iraqi "commandos," as the Pentagon's own news site, DefendAmerica, reported in December 2005.
It was not long after this that the militia activity began the dizzying, horrifying rise that shows no signs of abating.
Meanwhile, the sectarian militias of the Iraqi parties empowered by Bush's invasion have long infiltrated the army, police and various government ministries.
With the entire county now riddled with militias waging a hydra-headed civil war, it has become a cliché of Washington political chat to say that US military forces are in danger of becoming "just another militia" in Iraq.
But behind that turn of phrase is a darker truth: the Bush team itself formed many of the first militias set loose upon Iraq, thus seeding the bloody strife now consuming the land.
Given this history, one would like to press Lt. Col. Garver a bit further and ask: Are these the kind of "units we don't talk about" that carried out the raid in Ishaqi last Friday?
If not, why won't you identify the troops whose successful operation — with clean kills and no "collaterals" — brought us another step closer to "establishing a safe and peaceful Iraq"?
III.   The Midnight Hour
Of course, it might have been more straightforward: an ordinary unit of overstrained, undertrained American troops sent off on a midnight mission in a hostile village where their comrades had killed 11 civilians a few months before.
They were told "al-Qaeda" was lurking in the shadows.
(Strangely enough, although the Pentagon itself admits that self-declared "al-Qaeda" franchise operators in Iraq make up, at most, 2 to 3 percent of the insurgent forces, the most controversial incidents always seem to involve "al-Qaeda" agents.)
Where did this intelligence come from?
Was it solid data?
Someone seeking a bounty?
Did it come from a tortured prisoner?
Was it one sectarian militia baiting the Americans to attack a rival?
Someone with a grudge against the al-Jalmood family?
We don't know; most likely, the soldiers didn't know either.
They did what they were told.
They moved into the village.
They began searching some buildings.
Someone started shooting at them.
They killed a couple of people but the bullets kept coming.
So they did what threatened US troops routinely do to protect themselves: they called for an airstrike.
A plane came down and dropped a couple of bombs or fired some missiles in the darkness.
Two houses blew up.
There was screaming.
Burning bodies.
Smoking rubble, some nasty hardware all around.
All the corpses that they could see, what was left of them, looked like terrorists [Iraq resistance].
A couple of women there, maybe.
Guns nearby.
Terrorists [Iraq resistance].
As the sun came out, perhaps the villagers of Taima emerged from their hiding places and began to dig through the rubble of the al-Jalmoods' houses.
Here was the body of a 10-year-old boy, captured on film by AP, as someone cradled his lifeless head.
Here were women kneeling in the dust to keen over charred remains.
Here were police gathering the names, trying to count the dead.
 
Reminiscent of similar airstrike
It was a scene reminiscent of last March, when the people of the nearby Ishaqi district village of Abu Sifa brought out their dead from a similar airstrike on accused al-Qaeda operatives.
Then however, the scene was more horrific: five young children laid out on rugs, their bodies unmarked except for apparent bullet holes in their heads.
The charges too were more serious: not just a raid allegedly gone awry, with overkill and collateral damage, as last Friday, but a systematic execution of civilians in their homes followed by an airstrike called in to cover up the crime.
The Pentagon investigated the earlier incident and exonerated itself a few weeks later, although it never explained the discrepancy between its body count — one man, two women and a child — and the overwhelming photographic and eyewitness evidence of local Iraqi officials and Western news agencies of 11 casualties, including the five children.
 
Reminiscent of similar airstrike
There will likely be no Pentagon investigation of the latest mass killing in Ishaqi.
Certainly there will never be an independent probe that could establish the truth of what really happened in that midnight hour.   [Illegal — war crimes upon war crimes]
If it involved ordinary troops and not Bush's shadowy death squads and hired guns, it was probably not, technically speaking, an atrocity, not a planned murder of civilians, but a simple skirmish with hostile forces in the dark - terrorists, insurgents, militiamen, gangsters [Illegal — what stems from illegal fruit breeds seed that always remains illegal — war crimes upon war crimes — continuing war against Iraq resistance] — or with innocent homeowners defending their property, or maybe an inextricable mix of the two.
It was just another night in Iraq, another raid, another blood-letting, another outcry of anguish.
Meanwhile, the makers of the true atrocity, the great atrocity — the unprovoked, unsanctioned, unnecessary act of aggression responsible for all the mass Iraqi deaths in Ishaqi and across the land, all the dead and maimed Americans, all the ruin, all the senseless pain and suffering — will be making the rounds of sumptuous Christmas parties in the coming days.
They'll be feasting and toasting, dancing and laughing, swathed in the pomps of wealth and power, forever secure against the consequences of the evil they have done.
 
Blair won't bring me back my arms
Abbas lost his mother, father, and a little brother as well as 13 other members of their family in the UK-US allied 2003 invasion.
When the missile hit my home I heard my family screaming
At 12:00 o’clock in the night I suddenly heard a very big blast hitting my home, the house collapsed on us. There was a lot of fire
I want to ask Blair if he wants to come back with me to Iraq and tell the Iraqi people that he will do the same thing again…
That attack left the young man disabled — having suffered burns to 60 percent of his body, he lost his arms amputated due to severe burns.
New World Order Statistics of Human Misery of Soldiers and Military that fight for the 'Order'
('The West' and their lackey's Warfare)
Excluding Somalia and various other secret engagements
icasualties.org
Of the 3,417 coalition deaths in Afghanistan:
One Albania
40 Australia
One Belgium
158 Canada
Five Czech
43 Denmark
Nine Estonia
Two Finland
86 France
27 Georgia
54 Germany
Seven Hungary
48 Italy
Two Jordan
Three Latvia
One Lithuania
10 Unidentified as to country NATO
25 Netherlands
11 New Zealand
10 Norway
38 Poland
Two Portugal
21 Romania
Three Slovakia
One South Korea
34 Spain
Five Sweden
14 Turkey
447 UK
2,309 US
To January 22, 2014
These figures are 'Battle deaths' and do not include deaths that take place as early as two or three weeks outside the Afghanistan war zones when seriously injured troops are shipped to their home country, or in the situation with the US military to some hospital on a military base in another country.
These figures do not include suicide of soldiers who have returned home, or the killing and injuring of loved ones and others outside the family, by soldiers with mental impairment who have returned home.
At least 17,674 US personnel have been wounded in action, according to the Pentagon between November 2001 and September 2012.
      U.S. & Coalition/Casualties     
      in Afghanistan occupation      
Of the 4,804 coalition deaths in Iraq:
4,486 have been Americans
Two Australia
One Azerbaijan
Thirteen Bulgaria
One Czech Republic
Seven Denmark
5 El Salvador
Two Estonia
One Fiji
Five Georgia
One Hungary
33 Italy
One Kazakhstan
Three Latvia
Two Netherlands
23 Poland
Three Romania
Four Slovakia
One South Korea
11 Spain
Two Thailand
Eighteen Ukraine
179 UK
To January 22, 2014
These figures are 'Battle deaths' and do not include deaths that take place outside Iraq war zones, as early as two or three weeks, after seriously injured troops are shipped to their home country, or in the situation with the US military to some hospital on a military base in another country.
— other coalition deaths are estimated at up to 10,000 deaths including contract people brought into Iraq by coalition forces.
These figures do not include suicide of soldiers who have returned home, or the killing and injuring of loved ones and others outside the family, by soldiers with mental impairment who have returned home.
At least 32,223 U.S. troops have been wounded in action, according to the Pentagon between March 2003 and November 2011.
      U.S. & Coalition/Casualties     
      in Iraq occupation                     
 
CIA Obama the acting president
Every facial movement, gesture of the hand, word enunciated by the 44th president turns out to be a complete charade
The CIA — Obama — Illuminati
A long-term strategic CIA plan to recruit promising candidates
and steer these individuals and their families into positions of influence and power
Behavior modification
Phenomenological — structures of consciousness — programs
US policy has even less regard for human rights both abroad and at home
ANOTHER 90 people killed in Afghanistan by NATO — murderers, continued killers in a country in which they have ABSOLUTELY no right.
Do NOT FORGET the attack on the twin towers on September 11, 2001 had NOTHING to do with Afghanistan, nor its government, nor its people.
It had EVERYTHING to do with the corruption and degradation of the ruling elite in the west.
Another Soldier Refuses Afghanistan Deployment
Wednesday 12 August 2009
t r u t h o u t
by: Dahr Jamail
Sgt. Travis Bishop, who served 14 months in Baghdad with the 3rd Signal Brigade, faces a court-martial this Friday for refusing to deploy to Afghanistan.
Bishop is the second soldier from Fort Hood in as may weeks to be tried by the military for his stand against an occupation he believes is 'illegal.'
He insists that it would be unethical for him to deploy to support an occupation he opposes on both moral and legal grounds and he has filed for conscientious objector (CO) status.
Spc. Victor Agosto was court-martialed last week for his refusal to deploy to Afghanistan.
Agosto's lawyer, James Branum, who is also Bishop's lawyer, is the legal adviser to the GI Rights Hotline of Oklahoma and co-chair of the Military Law Task Force.
Branum told Truthout during a phone interview on July 10 that, contrary to mainstream opinion that believes Afghanistan to be a 'justified; war, the invasion and ongoing occupation are actually in violation of the US Constitution and international law.
A child wounded in Jalalabad Afghanistan due to US bombardment of residential areas
"Victor is approaching this from the standpoint of law and ethics," Branum explained, "It's his own personal ethics and principles of the Nuremberg Principles, that the war in Afghanistan does not meet the criteria for lawful war under the UN Charter, which says that member nations who joined the UN, as did the US, should give up war forever, aside from two exceptions: that the war is in self-defense and that the use of force was authorized by the UN Security Council.
The nation of Afghanistan did not attack the United States.
The Taliban may have, but the nation and people of Afghanistan did not.
And under US law, the Supremacy Clause of the US Constitution, any treaty enacted by the US is now the 'supreme law of the land.'
So when the United States signed the UN Charter, we made that our law as well."
Bishop told Truthout he was inspired by Agosto's stand and had chosen to follow Specialist Agosto's example of refusal.
Both his time in Iraq, the illegality of the occupation and a moral awakening led to his decision to refuse to deploy.
"I started to see a big difference between our reality there and what was in the news," Bishop explained to Truthout about his experience in Iraq, but went on to add that morality and religion played a role as well.
When he received orders to deploy to Afghanistan, Bishop said, "I started reading my Bible to get right with my creator before going.   Through my reading I realized all this goes against what Jesus taught and what all true Christians should believe.   I had a religious transformation, and realized that all war is wrong."
Bishop received his orders to deploy to Afghanistan in February, but at the time "didn't know there was a support network or a way out at all.   I thought GI resistance was something archaic from Vietnam."
As his deployment date approached, he met with other soldiers at a GI resistance cafe, 'Under the Hood', in Killeen, Texas.
US bombardment
"They told me not only do I have a choice, but I have a support network backing me up," Bishop explained.   "I told them my thinking, and they said that I sounded like a CO.   They put me in touch with (James) Branum and when I learned from him what a CO was, I knew I couldn't go."
Bishop went absent without leave (AWOL) for one week the day his unit deployed, "because I didn't have time to prepare to file for CO status.   So while AWOL I prepared a statement and filled out my application for CO (status).   Then I went back (to Fort Hood) with Branum and turned myself in.   I never planned on staying AWOL.   They gave me a barracks room and assigned me to a platoon and told me to show up to work the next day.   That was it.   They started the CO process, but they also started the Uniform Code of Military Justice process, and that's where it gets shifty."
Shortly thereafter, the military charged him with two counts of missing movement and disobeying a direct order.
Bishop, Agosto, and other resisters are not alone.
In November 2007, the Pentagon revealed that between 2003 and 2007 there had been an 80 percent increase in overall desertion rates in the Army (desertion refers to soldiers who go AWOL and never intend to return to service), and Army AWOL rates from 2003 to 2006 were the highest since 1980.
Between 2000 and 2006, more than 40,000 troops from all branches of the military deserted, more than half from the Army.
Army desertion rates jumped by 42 percent from 2006 to 2007 alone.
Bishop informed Truthout that morale is low among his peers in the military, whether they are pro-war or opposed to the occupations.
"Hard Corps folks, as soon as they hear about my sentence being capped at a year, they are changing their minds already," he said.
"There's a lot of soldiers that go just because they feel they have to go.
They are driven by money and legal obligation, not patriotism.
They go because they don't want to lose their job and get in trouble.
A lot of the people I talk to that are in, they feel as I do, but they say things like 'I only have four more months, so I'll ride it out and hope not to get stop-lossed.'"
Spc. Michael Kern, an active duty veteran of the occupation of Iraq (where he served from March 2007 to March 2008), is also based at Fort Hood.
Lying Is The Most Powerful Weapon In War
He is currently getting treatment for traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
Kern turned against both occupations, as he told Truthout:
"Once I realized it wasn't a war and was an occupation, and once I realized I was a terrorist to people in Iraq.
It wasn't a hard decision.
My whole unit feels as I do, but are afraid to speak out because they don't know there is support for those of us who speak out against the war."
Kern, like Bishop, says that troop morale is very low.
"I'd say it's at an all-time low — mostly because of Afghanistan now.
Nobody knows why we are at either place, and I believe the troops need to know why they are there, or we should pull out, and this is a unanimous feeling, even for folks who are pro-war."
Kern feels that the decisions of Agosto and Bishop to refuse to deploy to Afghanistan is worthy of admiration and support.
"I admire these guys," he told Truthout.
"They are truly amazing. I wish I would have done that, but when I deployed I didn't know what I was getting into, or my options.
I look up to these guys.
They are standing up for what they believe in, and that's the greatest thing any of us can do, and they are doing it despite what the Army is doing to them."
Kern suggests that soldiers:
"do your research before you willingly follow orders, because this is an unjust war, and according to Army regulations, you are entitled to question an illegal order, such as deploying to an illegal war not sanctioned by the UN.
And that there is a large community of support for those who are standing up.
And it's all over the world, not just the US, wherever you are, there are people who feel the same way you do."
In England, Lance Cpl. Joe Glenton, from the Royal Logistics Corps, has become the first British soldier to speak out publicly against the war in Afghanistan.
Victim of the US strikes
Afghanistan
Glenton delivered a letter to British Prime Minister Gordon Brown on 30 July stating why he is refusing to return to Afghanistan.
Glenton wrote:
"The war in Afghanistan is not reducing the terrorist risk, far from improving Afghan lives it is bringing death and devastation to their country.
Britain has no business there.
I do not believe that our cause in Afghanistan is just or right.
I implore you, Sir, to bring our soldiers home."
Glenton, like Agosto, and soon for Bishop, began his court-martial proceedings on 3 August.
US commanders recently announced that US and NATO troop deaths from Afghan bombings spiked six-fold in July, compared to the same month last year.
In July, resistance fighters detonated the highest number of bombs against occupation forces in the eight-year occupation, according to figures released Tuesday.
More US troops were killed in July in Afghanistan than any other month of the entire occupation, and violence continues.
Meanwhile, Anthony Cordesman, a senior adviser to the US military commander in charge of NATO forces in Afghanistan, Gen. Stanley McChrystal, told The Times of London that an additional 45,000 US troops are needed in Afghanistan.
Bishop hopes his refusal to deploy will inspire soldiers to search their consciences.
"My hope is that people who feel like me, that they don't have a voice and are having doubts, I hope that this shows them that not only can you talk to someone about this, but that you actually have a choice," he said.
"Choice is the first thing they take away from you in the military," Bishop added.
"You're taught that you don't have a choice.
That's not true.
And not wanting to kill someone or get killed does not make you a coward.
I hope my actions show this to more people."
© t r u t h o u t 2009
A British soldier's story: 'People are suffering … I couldn't go back'
Alexandra Topping
Thursday 30 July 2009
Lance Corporal Joe Glenton, a soldier with the Royal Logistics Corps, has written to Gordon Brown explaining why he refuses to fight in Afghanistan. He spoke to Alexandra Topping.
I was sent to Afghanistan in 2006 and from the start it was very challenging, it's a very hard place to be posted.
There was so much confusion about why we were there, whether it was to get rid of the poppy fields, or for national security.
I saw repatriations all the time and it just grinds you down.
The Nimrod crash [in which 14 men died when an RAF Nimrod exploded over Afghanistan on 2 September 2006] is one of my enduring memories.
I was one of the drivers and I can remember just going up and down the road in a JCB spending a whole afternoon humping coffins around, two at a time, on a forklift truck. Some people can shrug it off, and maybe I did at the time, but it is the type of thing that keeps coming back. They weren't even combat deaths, it was just the futility of it.
While I was there millions of bullets passed through my hands.
I can't account for where those bullets went. We were supplying more and more, and I didn't know where they were going.
It haunts me.
When I came back after my first tour I just couldn't see what we had given to the country.
I felt ashamed.
They were dark days.
When I joined the army I was lean, green and keen.
I was proud of being a soldier.
But now, as a serving officer, I want my feelings to be known.
Kisses mother
I want the government to consider the welfare of the guys out there, and the welfare of the Afghan people.
People are suffering and it shouldn't be allowed.
When I came back from Afghanistan in 2007 I was promoted and redeployed in the UK.
I wasn't supposed to be going back originally, because it would have been in breach of harmony guidelines [under which soldiers should not spend more than more 13 months within a three-year period on tour].
But then we were told we would be going back.
And I just couldn't go back.
It was an incredibly difficult thing to do, I loved the army, but I had lost my faith in the structure, the government and the cause.
I went to south-east Asia, I just needed to escape.
I was dealing with it very badly, drinking a lot.
Depression is a word that gets bandied about easily, but I wasn't very happy, that's for sure.
I was trying to find space to sort myself out, trying to drown it with drink.
I wasn't in contact with any of the lads, which was hard because it is like you lose your support group.
I didn't want to incriminate them.
You get into trouble if you have information about someone who has absconded and I didn't want to put anyone in that position.
I've spoken to some of them since, they have been supportive.
They said 'What happened to you?   We didn't expect this from you.'   But I told them I had to do what I had to do.
I went to Australia after a few months.
I thought all the time the army would catch up.
But I met my wife and she was my rock.
She helped persuade me to call the awol hotline.
It was hard but I had to do it.
We came back in May and I thought I would be nobbled at customs.
But no one was there, so I handed myself in to my unit.
I'm pending court martial now and face up to two years in prison.
It's scary stuff and I'm tempted to head for the hills but I believe I have something to say, something to contribute, so I will just crack on with it.
Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2009
White Phosphorus attack by Western powers
Razia 8 years old
shell fired by Western troops
Atrocities — graphic pictures  

8 year old Razia from Kapisa province, Afghanistan who was burned when a shell fired by Western troops exploded into their house, enveloping her head and neck in the blazing chemical.

'The kids called out to me that I was burning but the explosion was so strong that for a moment I was deaf and couldn't hear anything,' her father, Aziz Rahman, told Reuters, May 8, 2009.

140 killed in Afghanistan by US air strike, 93 of those killed were children, the youngest eight days old.

Obama mass murderer.

International Global Elite Strategy

Photo: RAWA
8 year old Razia from Kapisa province, Afghanistan, burned when a shell fired by Western troops exploded into their house, enveloping her head and neck in the blazing chemical.
'The kids called out to me that I was burning but the explosion was so strong that for a moment I was deaf and couldn't hear anything,' her father, Aziz Rahman, told Reuters
May 8, 2009.
Atrocities Lebanon and Palestine
CIA Obama the acting president
Every facial movement, gesture of the hand, word enunciated by the 44th president turns out to be a complete charade
The CIA — Obama — Illuminati
A long-term strategic CIA plan to recruit promising candidates
and steer these individuals and their families into positions of influence and power
Behavior modification
Phenomenological — structures of consciousness — programs
US policy has even less regard for human rights both abroad and at home
 
 
 
 
 
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