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Photo of two boys playing a game in North Korea.

Image: expressen.se
Two boys playing a game in North Korea.
Photo of North Korea city people growing food just outside the city.

Image: expressen.se
Growing food in the city
Photo of North Korea city people walking.

Image: expressen.se
Photo of North Korea city people walking
US North Korea war

US B-29 Superfortress bombers bombing North Korea.

Image: Internet
US B-29 Superfortress bombers bombing North Korea
One thing recent history has shown, countries with nuclear weapons don’t get attacked — Pakistan.
Countries which give up their nuclear weapons do — Libya and Iraq
On 12 August 1950, the USAF dropped 625 tons of bombs on North Korea; two weeks later, the daily tonnage increased to some 800 tons.
U.S. warplanes dropped more napalm and bombs on North Korea than they did during the whole Pacific campaign of World War II.
Almost every substantial building in North Korea was destroyed.
US Major General William F. Dean stated that most North Korean cities and villages were either rubble or had become snow-covered wasteland.
US Biological warfare
Medical investigations in China concluded that in some cases, particularly with respect to plague, anthrax, cholera, and encephalitis, there was evidence of US biological warfare being used on North Korea.
These investigations complemented the work of the North Korean Medical Corps serving with the Chinese army in Korea, which reported evidence of plague and cholera verified by medical laboratories in Beijing.
Prof. Guilford B. Reed, head of the Canadian biological warfare laboratories at Queens University concluded that the Chinese evidence was entirely feasible, and recommended that Minister of External Affairs Lester B. Pearson avoid public discussion of the scientific aspects of the charges.
On 20 March 1952, Brigadier General O.L. Grover, of the US air force Psychological Warfare Division which was responsible for integrating biological warfare capabilities and requirements, sent out a memo in response to a question from the US air force command stationed in Europe.
The memo stated that: 'Current war plans assume that on Presidential decision, the United States may use biological warfare if it appears to be in the national interest.
http://www.yorku.ca/sendicot/ReplytoColCrane.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_biological_weapons_program
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/northkorea/7811949/Did-the-US-wage-germ-warfare-in-Korea.html
Photo of North Korea people saying hello.

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North Korea people saying hello
US North Korea war

US bombing North Korea, December 1950

Image: Internet
US bombing North Korea, December 1950
Photo of lots of hellos from North Korea young women.

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Lots of hellos from North Korea young women
US North Korea war

US bombing Wonsan bridge eastern coast of North Korea.

Image: Internet
US bombing Wonsan bridge eastern coast of North Korea
Photo of ball game played by boys of North Korea.

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Ball game played by boys of North Korea
US North Korea war

US bombing Wonsan eastern coast of North Korea, 1951

Image: Internet
US bombing Wonsan North Korea 1951
Photo of young North Korea woman roller skating.

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Young North Korea woman roller skating
US North Korea war

USS Missourt firing on Chongjin North Korea, October 1950

Image: Internet
USS Missourt firing on Chongjin North Korea, October 1950
Photo of young North Korea children being played music too.

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Young North Korea children being played music
US North Korea war

The effects of the US North Korea War on ordinary people.

Image: Internet
Effects of US North Korea War on ordinary people
The US is still occupying and playing war games in South Korea
737 U.S. Military Bases in varied countries around the world
US military bases around world

737 U.S. Military Bases in varied countries around the world

Image: Internet
737 U.S. occupying Military Bases in varied countries around the world
Let's start a nuclear war - North Korea version.

Image: whatreallyhappened.com
Let's start a nuclear war.

Image: whatreallyhappened.com
P.S.   Nuclear war on this planet nobody comes out unmutated!
Let's start a nuclear war - US version.

Image: mediafreedominternational.org
cnn.com
U.S. blueprint for N. Korea war
Monday, May 12, 2003
From Jamie McIntyre, CNN Senior Pentagon Correspondent
North Korea's 'military first' policy has produced a formidable military force.
North Korea's 'military first' policy has produced a formidable military force.
WASHINGTON (CNN) — If the U.S. were to go to war with North Korea, it would be a very different conflict than the one against Iraq.
The U.S. has "war-gamed" the scenario for years — a blueprint for the defense of South Korea that Pentagon insiders know as "OP-PLAN 50-27."
Every year the U.S. and South Korean military rehearse the plan and the result is always the same: The U.S. and its allies prevail, but at a terrible price.
For half-a-century, the U.S. has been obligated by treaty to execute that war plan, if the North ever invades the South.
U.S. Army Gen. Leon LaPorte's job is to make sure the North loses.
He is confidant that if North Korea were ever to attack the South, that attack would be defeated.
Nonetheless LaPorte and many of his predecessors say North Korea's military, while obsolete, is nevertheless formidable, with 70 percent of its army massed south of Pyongyang along the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ).
Retired General John Tilleli, who commanded U.S. forces stationed in Korea from 1996-1999, says the North is capable of unleashing a huge military arsenal at a moments notice.
Some 37,000 U.S. troops are stationed in South Korea.
Some 37,000 U.S. troops are stationed in South Korea.
"They have short range and medium range missiles, present and deployed," he says.
"They have weapons of mass destruction," he adds, "and oh, by the way, they have about a million-plus ground forces."
The Pentagon says about 800 of the North's missiles can strike any point in South Korea, and even as far as Japan.
Tilleli says he believes the North has chemical weapons and can mount chemical warheads on some of those missiles.
If the North decided to go to war, he says, "I would expect that the regime would use all means available."
Under the North's "military first" policy, most of the country's extremely limited resources are devoted to its armed forces.
Pyongyang has invested heavily in things like artillery, according to U.S. intelligence reports, with an estimated 11,000 guns pointing southwards.
Many are hidden in hardened bunkers in the mountainous border region.
By one calculation they are capable of raining as many as 300,000 shells an hour in to the heart of the South Korean capital, a mere 40 miles south of the DMZ.
Ash Carter, Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy during the Clinton administration, says the consequences would be devastating.
"This is a war that takes place in a crowded suburb of a teeming, modern Asian city," he says.
"It's an intensity of violence that we haven't seen since the last Korean War and God forbid it to take place would truly shock people."
One Pentagon projection estimates a million casualties on both sides, including as many as 50,000 U.S. troops.
North Korean leader Kim Jong Il now says he has his finger on a nuclear trigger.
North Korean leader Kim Jong Il now says he has his finger on a nuclear trigger.
According to U.S. commanders, the brunt of the South Korea's defense would be borne initially by its own 600,000-strong army, and its Air Force of 780 aircraft, including Korean F-15s and F-16s.
But sources say the war plan also calls for quickly supplementing the 37,000 U.S. troops based in South Korea with up to 500,000 American reinforcements, backed by massive use of U.S. airpower to prevent the fall of Seoul.
Says Ash Carter:
"Our objective is to hold north of Seoul because we don't want Seoul to change hands twice,"
"That means you can't trade territory for time.
In military terms that means a rapid war of attrition up near the DMZ."
Ash Carter, indeed, was there when "OP-PLAN 50-27" almost went into action in 1994.
Brink of war
He says the U.S. came close to ordering a strike by F-117s stealth jets and Tomahawk cruise missile to take out North Korea's nuclear facilities at Yongbyon.
The idea was to set back the North's nuclear program for years by entombing inside the plant the plutonium that could otherwise be used for nuclear weapons.
RELATED
In 1994 then President Bill Clinton had to weigh whether a preemptive strike would spark an all out war.
Before the decision could be made an eleventh-hour agreement that froze North Korea's nuclear program, averted military action.
But now, should diplomacy fail, U.S. President George W. Bush — who has a stated policy of preemption — would face the same unpalatable choice, with one new wrinkle.
According to the U.S., North Korean leader, Kim Jong Il, now claims to have a nuclear bomb, and is demanding to be treated as a nuclear power.
"One or two nuclear weapons adds to the level of destruction but it doesn't transform the situation," says Carter.
"They are capable today of reeking awful destruction," he adds, warning: "it will also be their self-destruction if they ever do it."
© 2003 Cable News Network LP, LLLP.
An AOL Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved.
Photo of North Korea military having photo taken.

Image: expressen.se
Photo of North Korea military having photo taken
Photo of North Korea man on oxcart.

Image: expressen.se
North Korea man on oxcart
Photo of North Korea rainy day in city.

Image: expressen.se
Rain
Photo of North Korea men walking.

Image: expressen.se
Men going to war memorial service
Photo of North Korea young men and women gathering.

Image: expressen.se
Young men and women gathering
North Korea  — 2017
“Every means of communication, every installation, factory, city, and village” was ordered bombed by General MacArthur in the fall of 1950.
It never stopped until the day of the armistice on July 27, 1953.
“Over a period of three years or so we killed off – what – twenty percent of the population.”
Lost 8 – 9 million people during the 37-month long “hot” war, 1950 – 1953.
     Regime Change:      
      Millions of civilians deaths.       
      Humanitarian bombing?”       
      North Korea versus the United States:      Who are the Demons?      
 
 




CIA Obama the acting president
Every facial movement, gesture of the hand, word enunciated by the 44th president turns out to be a complete charade
The CIA — Obama — Illuminati
A long-term strategic CIA plan to recruit promising candidates
and steer these individuals and their families into positions of influence and power
Behavior modification
Phenomenological — structures of consciousness — programs
US policy has even less regard for human rights both abroad and at home

 
 





 
For archives, these articles are being stored on TheWE.cc website.
The purpose is to advance understandings of environmental, political,
human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues.