15 April 2011
Tsunami: Death and survival at school swimming club
By Damian Grammaticas
BBC News, Rikuzentakata, Japan
Yukiko Horie swimming instructor, Japan.

School swimming two survived

Yukiko Horie says she is sorry she was not with her students when the tsunami hit.
Yukiko Horie says she is sorry she was not with her students when the tsunami hit
Standing outside Rikuzentakata's community hall, Yukiko Horie clasps her hands together and then touches them to her forehead.
She bows and says a quiet prayer.
The three-storey building is still standing, but it has been completely wrecked by the tsunami that swept through just over a month ago.
Someone has placed a small bunch of artificial flowers on a smashed window ledge near what was the main door.
When Yukiko looks up she sighs with grief.
She tells me that in her prayer she was talking to her students.
Six of them died here.
One is still missing.
"I kind of apologised to them, saying I'm sorry that on the day I was not with them, I felt very sorry."
One month on Yukiko Horie is wracked by guilt that she survived while the children died.
They were all aged between 16 and 17, and were members of Takata High School's swimming club.
Yukiko, an English teacher, was also one of the two coaches in charge of the club.
She was not with the team when the earthquake struck on 11 March but at school.
Hill climb
Of the 11 members of the club, nine had gone to practice at Rikuzentakata's B&G swimming centre down by the seafront.
They had just got changed into their swimming costumes when the magnitude 9 quake hit.
Fearing a tsunami, the staff at B&G followed their established evacuation drill and took the nine children a mile or so to the town's community centre, right opposite Rikuzentakata's town hall.
Members of the swimming club before the Japan tsunami hit on March 11, 2011.

Six members of the Takata High School swimming club died and one is missing
Six members of the Takata High School swimming club died and one is missing
It was a fateful decision.   Takata High School was closer, but the community hall was the designated tsunami shelter for anyone at the pool.
At the school, Yukiko Horie had started to evacuate several hundred children who were still in classes.
The second swimming teacher, 29-year-old Motoko Mori, hurried off towards the seaside to try to find the club members and bring them to safety.
Ms Mori has not been seen since.   She got married in March last year.
Yukiko Horie and the children in school all reached the top of the hill before the tsunami struck.   They all survived.
But, down on lower ground, the community hall was swallowed by the waves.
Along with the swimming team, many adults were also sheltering inside.
'Pushed them in'
As Yukiko steps into the ruined hall for the first time since the disaster, broken glass and splintered wood crunch underfoot.
Torn wires and shredded cladding hang from the ceiling.   Twisted panels lie everywhere.
One huge concrete wall and the giant steel girders that once held up the roof of the hall's concert auditorium have all caved in.
Rows and rows of seats have been ripped from their mountings.   Everything has been smashed to pieces.
Incredibly two girls from the swimming team managed, somehow, to survive this.
With a mobile phone pressed to her ear, Yukiko is speaking to one of them, Honoka Sasaki, who is in hospital.   She is guiding Yukiko through the building.
Yukiko is looking for the storeroom up on the third floor where the two girls clung to each other while the waters swirled around them.
She ends the call as we have to scramble under twisted pipes and then, suddenly, she sees the room.   The door is ajar.
"This is the place.   It's exactly here," Yukiko exclaims.
"It must be.   They couldn't open the door, but the wave pushed them in."
Honoka and the second girl, 16-year-old Chihiro Kanno, told Yukiko how they ran upstairs to escape the rising water.
But it caught up with them.   The water forced the door of the store open, and swept them inside.
"Ah, look," she says, pointing at the wall near the ceiling.
"Up there, it's very clear you can see the line on the wall where the water reached.
It's just a few inches from the top.
In that space they had air.
They were swimming, just to keep breathing."
Yukiko is making a paddling motion with her hands as if re-enacting the way the girls struggled to keep their heads above the water.
he community hall in Rikuzentakata, Japan, hit by the tsunami, March 11, 2011.

School swimming two survived

The community hall was a designated evacuation area in Rikuzentakata.
The community hall was a designated evacuation area in Rikuzentakata
The storeroom is small and dark.   The tidemark where the water stopped rising is easily visible, about six inches below the ceiling, which must be 9ft (3m) up.
"How is it possible?"  Yukiko says out loud.   "The girls!   Here!   Amazing!"
Swept away
After the earthquake, 16-year-old Chihiro had been crying and panicking.
But a third girl from the swimming club had calmed her, telling her not to worry, it would all be fine.
As the tsunami swept into the hall, Chihiro held the girl's hand while they fled upstairs.
But when the water forced Chihiro into the storeroom she could not keep hold of her friend.   They were pulled apart.
Chihiro and Honoka watched as their teammate was swept across the hall, pressed against an elevator by the wave, then carried away.
"They saw it," says Yukiko.
Then she turns.
"Here's the elevator.   The girl was struggling.
The two of them, here, they were watching.
But they couldn't help.   Oh."
And she raises her hands to her face again, sighs, and bows once more.
The two surviving girls were trapped in the storeroom, holding on to each other and struggling to breathe in their air pocket for 10 or 15 minutes until the tsunami receded.
Then, soaking wet, they spent a night trapped in the building in the freezing cold until they were found by a rescue team the next day.
'Find a door'
Chihiro Kanno after the Japan tsunami hit on March 11, 2011.

Six members of the Takata High School swimming club died and one is missing

Chihiro Kanno survived in a storage room where water did not quite reach the ceiling
Chihiro Kanno survived in a storage room where water did not quite reach the ceiling
Honoka Sasaki is still in hospital.
She cut her leg on a ventilation fan that was floating in the water and had to have an operation last week.
"Honoka remembers the terrible things and cannot sleep," says Yukiko, "though gradually she is sleeping a little more.
"I don't know how to help her," she adds, "I think the terrible experience will stay with the girls for their lives."
Chihiro Kanno was taken to an evacuation shelter.
In the chaos after the disaster it took her three days to find her parents.
They thought she had died.
Her home has been destroyed so she now lives in a tiny room in an old people's home, along with other evacuees.
Chihiro now has frequent nightmares.   She tries to keep busy, to ward off the memories.   She is polite and shy.
In a soft, quiet voice, she says:
"We were in the hall on the 3rd floor when the wave came over us,"
I was holding my friend's hand, but we got separated, then she was swept away.
I was washed into the storage room.
I was underwater, my back touched the floor.
Above me was wreckage.
I dodged it and swam up.
There was a small space between the ceiling and the water, I could breathe there.
I heard Honoka say 'Are you there, Chihiro?   Find a door.'
We held each other and waited until the water drained away."
Chihiro wants to get back to school as soon as possible to be with her friends.
But the tsunami destroyed her town of Rikuzentakata.
Of its population of 23,000, one in 10 is dead or missing.
Half have lost their homes.
'Can't sleep'
All around Rikuzentakata teams of soldiers are clearing up the broken buildings.
They are depositing smashed wood, twisted metal and wreckage in neat piles.
The fabric of an entire town is being carried away so Rikuzentakata can be rebuilt.
Blossom on a hill over-looking the destroyed city of Rikuzentakata, Japan, after being hit by the tsunami, March 11, 2011.

School swimming two survived

The earthquake and tsunami killed one in 10 residents in Rikuzentakata.
Blossom on a hill over-looking the destroyed city of Rikuzentakata
The earthquake and tsunami killed one in 10 residents in Rikuzentakata
But the many, many broken lives here and in other towns for hundreds of miles along the coast may never be repaired.
Japan's Red Cross says up to one in 10 of all survivors from Japan's earthquake and tsunami might now suffer post traumatic stress disorder.
That could be tens of thousands of people.
The trauma may be the legacy that weighs the longest on Japan.
Takata High School is a wreck.
The reinforced three-storey building is still standing.
But the sports hall was picked up and rammed into one side of the school.
Every classroom is full of debris.
Yukiko Horie, the swimming teacher, walks slowly through the building.
She cannot escape her feelings of guilt that she could not save her students.
"At night I can't sleep," she says.
"I imagine many things because I was not with them in that building.   How horrible it was.   The fear.   How cold was the water.   How scared, the black water.
I imagine I could see they tried to struggle and they are good swimmers, maybe they tried to swim and go up, but I couldn't help them."
Now Yukiko is working with the other teachers to open a new, temporary school for the surviving children.
She says she tries to be strong for her students.
"These days I am thinking if they were here, the swimming members, what they will tell me.
I imagine, maybe they will ask me to try not to be so sad, to just stand up.
I think they will tell me that.   So that's my strength."
And then she adds:
"Sometimes the swimming members appear in my dream and they also make me laugh.
I should step forward, so I try not to be thinking of the sad stories.
I have a responsibility to step forward."
© MMXI
On April 1st (and this is no fool’s joke), 16 Japanese experts on nuclear power engineering, nuclear physics and radiology issued a frightening statement, saying that they:
Do not rule out the possibility that as time goes on, a molten core melts a weak part of a pressure vessel and enters a containment vessel, destroying the reactor's function to contain radioactive substances.
Or that hydrogen gas forming inside a pressure vessel explodes and destroys a containment vessel, causing serious radioactive contamination over a large expanse of land and sea.
The current makeshift efforts to cool the No. 1, 2 and 3 reactors will not be able to completely cool down molten nuclear fuel so as it will not burst through the bottom of pressure vessels.
TEPCO sent a proposal to the Fukushima prefectural government requesting that it build two more reactors at the stricken site!
The Fukushima official in charge steamed with anger shouting, 'are you guys completely crazy?'
Judging by the gravity of the situation in relation to the industry and government response, the answer may be, 'yes.'
TEPCO’s behavior has clearly shown, before, at the beginning of, and now during the nuclear crisis, that saving face and worrying about profits is of greater concern than preventing the worsening of the crisis.
5.7 Mag 2011/04/14 06:08:49 Lat 35.675  Lon 141.873 Depth 14.4 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN

6.1 Mag 2011/04/13 19:57:24 Lat 39.587 Lon 143.357 Depth 11.2 OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN

Image: earthquake.usgs.gov
Earthquakes listed of previous seven days April 7 — April 14 2011
5.7 Mag   2011/04/14   06:08:49   Lat 35.675   Lon 141.873   Depth 14.4
NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU JAPAN
6.1 Mag   2011/04/13   19:57:24   Lat 39.587   Lon 143.357   Depth 11.2
OFF THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
Daily deposition of iodine 131 I-131  bq/m2 for April 1 to 11 2011

Image: IAEA
Extreme spike in radiation of I-131 levels 100 miles from Fukushima following 6.0 Mag earthquakes.
April 14 2011
200% Temperature Spike At Japan Fukushima Nuclear Reactor 4.
Radioactive cesium found in spinach, arugala, and kale around San Francisco Bay area
Cesium and Tellurium have been found in Boise, Las Vegas, Nome and Dutch Harbor, Honolulu, Kauai and Oahu, Anaheim, Riverside, San Francisco, and San Bernardino, Jacksonville and Orlando, Salt Lake City,  Guam, and Saipan.
Japan nuclear plant emission radiation is being found in drinking water and in milk above EPA limits across the United States.
Daily deposition of Cesium 137 Cs-137 Bq/m2 

Image: IAEA
Extreme spike in radiation of Cs-137 levels 100 miles from Fukushima following 6.0 Mag earthquakes.
TEPCO confirms some of the spent nuclear fuel rods stored in the No. 4 reactor building of Fukushima Daiichi power plant are damaged.
Higher than usual levels of radioactive iodine-131, cesium-134 and cesium-137 are being emmitted.
The roof and the upper walls of the No. 4 reactor building have been blown away by a hydrogen explosion and damaged by fires since the disaster struck the plant.
Toxic water, believed to originate from the No. 2 reactor core where fuel rods have partially melted, is hampering efforts to restore reactor 2 key cooling functions.
Japan has raised the measure of severity of the nuclear crisis to the highest level, level seven signifies a major accident with wider consequences.

6.2 Mag 2011/04/11 23:08:16 Lat 35.406 Lon 140.542 Depth 13.1 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU JAPAN

Image: earthquake.usgs.gov
Earthquakes listed of previous seven days April 5 — April 12 2011
6.0 Mag   2011/04/12   05:07:42     Lat 37.000   Lon 140.700   Depth 10.6
EASTERN HONSHU JAPAN
April 12 2011
TEPCO spokesman:  Radiation leakage at the plant could eventually exceed that of the 1986 Chernobyl catastrophe.
The Japan Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency said most of the radioactive material released in the air from Fukushima Daiichi came from the No. 2 reactor damaged by explosion March 15 2011.
At 6:10 a.m. on March 15, part of the reactor's containment vessel was damaged following an apparent hydrogen explosion.
Massive amounts of radioactive substances are now believed to have been released from the suppression pool of the reactor.
Japan has raised the measure of severity of the nuclear crisis to the highest level, level seven signifies a major accident with wider consequences.

6.2 Mag 2011/04/11 23:08:16 Lat 35.406 Lon 140.542 Depth 13.1 NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU JAPAN

Image: earthquake.usgs.gov
Earthquakes listed of previous seven days April 5 — April 12 2011
Japan has raised the measure of severity of the nuclear crisis to the highest level.
Level seven signifies a major accident with wider consequences.
6.2 Mag   2011/04/11   23:08:16     Lat 35.406   Lon 140.542   Depth 13.1
NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU JAPAN
French CRIIRAD has issued a warning for Europe for vulnerable groups:   children and pregnant or breastfeeding women.
Consumption of rainwater as a primary source of drinking water should be avoided, particularly among children.
As for tap water, underground catchments or large rivers should not present any problem.
But the institute suggests that the situation of water from reservoirs that collect rainwater from one or more watersheds, such as hillside lakes, should be examined more closely.
Spinach, salads, cabbage and other vegetables with large surface areas are among those food products that are particularly sensitive to iodine-131 contamination, if they are cultivated outside and exposed to rainwater.
Washing vegetables does not help, as iodine-131 is quickly metabolised by the plants.
Fresh milk and creamy cheeses, as well as meat from cattle that have been outside eating grass, are categorised as foods that may have been indirectly contaminated and must also be monitored.
Contamination of milk and cheese from goats and sheep may be of a greater magnitude than that of produce from cows.
Children up to two years old are the most vulnerable and ingestion of 50 becquerel (Bq) is enough to deliver to the body a dose of 10 mSv.
If foods such as leafy vegetables and milk contain between one and 10 Bq per kg or more, it is possible that the reference level of 10 mSv may be exceeded within two to three weeks.
Radioactive iodine-131 values measured by the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) in recent days show the following, varying levels of contamination:  0,08 Bq/kg in salad, spinach and leeks in Aix-en-Provence,  0,17 Bq per litre in milk in Lourdes and 2,1 Bq per litre in goats milk in Clansayes.
CRIIRAD notes that huge amounts of radioactive material have been released by the Fukushima Daiichi plant since Saturday 12 March 2011.
The releases continue.
Japan prime minister Naoto Kan says The government will give all its strength to work with you. We will never abandon you.'

Image: earthquake.usgs.gov
Last hour legend as of April 11 2011 09:15:46 UTC
Earthquakes listed of previous seven days April 4 — April 11 2011
April 11 2011
Japan fails to stop radioactive discharge into ocean
Reuters
Announced 7.1 Earthquake corrected to 6.6 Mag
2011/04/11 08:16:13 Lat37.007 Lon 140.477 Depth 10.0Km EASTERN HONSHU, JAPAN
Japan prime minister Naoto Kan says The government will give all its strength to work with you. We will never abandon you.'

Photo: Reuters
April 10 2011
Naoto Kan:
'The government will give all its strength to work with you.
We will never abandon you.'
March 12 2011
Naoto Kan:
'By taking firm measures, we will do our best not to have even a single person suffer from health problems.'
April 9 2011
The Japan Ministry of Economics, Trade and Industry, which has so far provided the most comprehensive daily data dump, has stopped reporting the dry well radiation reading in reactor 1 Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant.
This is the same reactor where following the 7.1 Earthquake on April 7, 2011, METI represented a reading of 100 Sieverts per hour in the dry well.
100 Sieverts per hour is on par with the worst data out of Chernobyl.
lucaswhitefieldhixson.com
The status of reactor 1 Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, and its dry well, is not known.
Latest forecast has all of California under nuclear radiation higher levels from Xenon Xe-133 April 10 and 11 2011

Japan Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant radiation cloud blankets western US in levels slightly lower than that over much of Japan outside Fukushima concentrated radiation area.

Although xenon is not toxic, its compounds such as 133Xe can be highly toxic.

Xenon xe-133 is a radionuclide that is inhaled to assess pulmonary function, and to image the lungs.

It is also often used to image blood flow, particularly in the brain.

Xe-133 is also an important fission product.

131mXe, 133Xe, 133mXe, and 135Xe are some of the fission products of both 235U and 239Pu, and therefore used as indicators of nuclear explosions.

Relatively high concentrations of radioactive xenon isotopes are also found emanating from nuclear reactors due to the release of this fission gas from 
cracked fuel rods or fissioning of uranium in cooling water.

The concentrations of these isotopes are still usually low compared to naturally occurring radioactive noble gases such as 222Rn.

Image: Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), April 4, 2011
Latest forecast I-131 and Cs-137 April 10 and 11 2011
The blue color nearing California at the left indicates similar concentrations to that off the coast of Japan.
Other radiation elements will be mixed with I-131 and Cs-137 in these clouds.
Latest forecast has all of California under nuclear radiation higher levels from Xenon Xe-133 April 10 and 11 2011

Japan Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant radiation cloud blankets western US in levels slightly lower than that over much of Japan outside Fukushima concentrated radiation area.

Although xenon is not toxic, its compounds such as 133Xe can be highly toxic.

Xenon xe-133 is a radionuclide that is inhaled to assess pulmonary function, and to image the lungs.

It is also often used to image blood flow, particularly in the brain.

Xe-133 is also an important fission product.

131mXe, 133Xe, 133mXe, and 135Xe are some of the fission products of both 235U and 239Pu, and therefore used as indicators of nuclear explosions.

Relatively high concentrations of radioactive xenon isotopes are also found emanating from nuclear reactors due to the release of this fission gas from 
cracked fuel rods or fissioning of uranium in cooling water.

The concentrations of these isotopes are still usually low compared to naturally occurring radioactive noble gases such as 222Rn.

Image: Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), April 4, 2011
Xenon xe-133 is a radionuclide that is inhaled to assess pulmonary function, and to image the lungs.
It is also often used to image blood flow, particularly in the brain.
Xe-133 is also an important fission product.
131mXe, 133Xe, 133mXe, and 135Xe are some of the fission products of both 235U and 239Pu, and therefore used as indicators of nuclear explosions.
Relatively high concentrations of radioactive xenon isotopes are also found emanating from nuclear reactors due to the release of this fission gas from cracked fuel rods or fissioning of uranium in cooling water.
The concentrations of these isotopes are still usually low compared to naturally occurring radioactive noble gases such as 222Rn.
Although xenon is not toxic, its compounds such as 133Xe can be highly toxic.
133Xe has a physical half-life of 5.243 days or becomes almost nonexistent in 52 days.
Cs-137 has a half-life of 30.17 years.
Onagawa nuclear power plant
Onagawa nuclear power plan

The 7.1 earthquake of April 7, 2011 has damaged the Onagawa Nuclear Power Plant, Onagawa, Japan.

A leak of radioactive water is being reported by Japanese TV, their information from Tokyo Electric Power Company TEPCO. 

The leak is said to originate from nuclear reactor spent fuel storage pools - from reactor one and reactor two at the Onagawa Nuclear Power Plant.

Photo: alexanderhiggins.com
The 7.1 earthquake of April 7, 2011 has damaged the Onagawa Nuclear Power Plant, Onagawa, Japan.
A leak of radioactive water is being reported by Japanese TV, their information from Tokyo Electric Power Company TEPCO.
The leak is said to originate from nuclear reactor spent fuel storage pools — spent fuel from reactor one and reactor two at the Onagawa Nuclear Power Plant.
Arial view of damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant Japan March 30 2011.

Japan Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant radiation cloud blankets western US in levels slightly lower than that over much of Japan outside Fukushima concentrated radiation area.

Image: Greenpeace
Arial view of damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant Japan March 30 2011
Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

Japan Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant radiation cloud blankets western US in levels slightly lower than that over much of Japan outside Fukushima concentrated radiation area.

Image: Internet
Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Okumamachi Japan
No safe threshold for radiation
Dr. Brian Moenchexcerpts from March 25 2011 article
Fish seven and a half million times increase in radiation.

Fish 7.5 million times increase in radiation.
Fish 7.5 million times increase in radiation around nuclear plant
The idea that a threshold exists or there is a safe level of radiation for human exposure began unraveling in the 1950s when research showed one pelvic x-ray in a pregnant woman could double the rate of childhood leukemia in an exposed baby.
Furthermore, the risk was ten times higher if it occurred in the first three months of pregnancy than near the end.
This became the stepping-stone to the understanding that the timing of exposure was even more critical than the dose.
The earlier in embryonic development it occurred, the greater the risk.
A new medical concept has emerged, increasingly supported by the latest research, called 'fetal origins of disease,' that centers on the evidence that a multitude of chronic diseases, including cancer, often have their origins in the first few weeks after conception by environmental insults disturbing normal embryonic development.
It is now established medical advice that pregnant women should avoid any exposure to x-rays, medicines or chemicals when not absolutely necessary, no matter how small the dose, especially in the first three months.
Epigenetic changes [chemical attachments to genes] can be caused by unimaginably small doses - parts per trillion - be it chemicals, air pollution, cigarette smoke or radiation.
Furthermore, these epigenetic changes can occur within minutes after exposure and may be passed on to subsequent generations.
The Endocrine Society warned that:
Even infinitesimally low levels of exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals, indeed, any level of exposure at all, may cause endocrine or reproductive abnormalities, particularly if exposure occurs during a critical developmental window.
Surprisingly, low doses may even exert more potent effects than higher doses.
If hormone-mimicking chemicals at any level are not safe for a fetus, then the concept is likely to be equally true of the even more intensely toxic radioactive elements drifting over from Japan, some of which may also act as endocrine disruptors.
Japan dumping nuclear radiation water into Pacific ocean from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Okumamachi Japan
Dumping nuclear radiated water into Pacific ocean from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Okumamachi Japan
Many epidemiologic studies show that extremely low doses of radiation increase the incidence of childhood cancers, low birth-weight babies, premature births, infant mortality, birth defects and even diminished intelligence.
Just two abdominal x-rays delivered to a male can slightly increase the chance of his future children developing leukemia.
By damaging proteins anywhere in a living cell, radiation can accelerate the aging process and diminish the function of any organ.
Cells can repair themselves, but the rapidly growing cells in a fetus may divide before repair can occur, negating the body's defense mechanism and replicating the damage.
Reference notes and complete article click here
Arial view of damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant Japan.

Japan Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant radiation cloud blankets western US in levels slightly lower than that over much of Japan outside Fukushima concentrated radiation area.

Image: Greenpeace
Arial view of damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant Japan
Greenpeace testing nuclear radiation levels in playgrounds in town of Iitate

Japan Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant radiation cloud blankets western US in levels slightly lower than that over much of Japan outside Fukushima concentrated radiation area.

Image: Greenpeace
Greenpeace radiation testing in town of Iitate
April 5 2011 — testing begins for playground radiation
Twenty five days after nuclear plants damaged
April 5 2011 — testing begins for playground radiation, twenty five days after nuclear plants damaged.

Children have been allowed to play outside even in the most vulnerable radiation threat areas.

Children used as PR — children used as public relation images to make believe that nothing is wrong, that the government has not brought harm.

TEPCO brings nuclear harm.

Japan Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant radiation cloud blankets western US in levels slightly lower than that over much of Japan outside Fukushima concentrated radiation area.

Although xenon is not toxic, its compounds such as 133Xe can be highly toxic.

Xenon xe-133 is a radionuclide that is inhaled to assess pulmonary function, and to image the lungs.

It is also often used to image blood flow, particularly in the brain.

Xe-133 is also an important fission product.

131mXe, 133Xe, 133mXe, and 135Xe are some of the fission products of both 235U and 239Pu, and therefore used as indicators of nuclear explosions.

Relatively high concentrations of radioactive xenon isotopes are also found emanating from nuclear reactors due to the release of this fission gas from 
cracked fuel rods or fissioning of uranium in cooling water.

The concentrations of these isotopes are still usually low compared to naturally occurring radioactive noble gases such as 222Rn.

Image: Internet
Japan sacrifices its most vulnerable
School playgrounds — three plus weeks after the beginning of the nuclear radiation threat — at last tested for radiation.
This only at the insistence of parents who demanded the testing.
Children have been allowed to play outside even in the most vulnerable radiation threat areas such as Fukushima.
'By taking firm measures, we will do our best not to have even a single person suffer from health problems,' the Japan Prime Minister Naoto Kan stated at a news conference March 12 2011.
Obviously small people in Japan are not considered people.
Or children used as PR —
children used as public relation images to 'make believe' that nothing is wrong — to portray that neither the government nor TEPCO have brought harm.
Yes these most vulnerable ones — whose thyroids are most at risk — have been allowed to play outside where they can intake the radiated iodine.
Fortunately many Japanese children, like their parents, eat varieties of seaweed in their diet — seaweed caught prior to the toxic radiation being emitted from the plant — this providing an amount of non radiated iodine that will help to modify the risk to the thyroid.
For those children who have eaten this seaweed.
For the others that do not, they do not have such protection and these, like most children around the world, are somewhat deficient in iodine — due to the poor eating habits of first world nation children, and the quality of food now being supplied which, the way it is grown, is now deficient in many minerals including iodine.
When through the air radioactive iodine is offered to the thyroid of children deficient in iodine, the thyroid will intake radioactive iodine rapidly.
And so the damage to the body of these young ones will begin.
Damage that will manifest in various ways throughout the rest of their lives.
'By taking firm measures, we will do our best not to have even a single person suffer from health problems'
April 5 2011 —
TWENTY FIVE DAYS after the nuclear plants were damaged — the Japan government began testing for radiation in the Fukushima schools.
Radioactivity in the school playgrounds has of course been detected.
God knows the amount of radioactivity in other playgrounds away from Fukushima, playgrounds that remain untested, the children still being allowed out in these untested areas.
The Japanese people are not yet aware of the horror that has and continues to be inflicted upon their country and their young ones.
Much of this damage could have been ameliorated, significantly reduced, had the Japan government acted decisively and immediately, placing the interest of children as paramount, rather then the interests of hiding and obfuscating — not supplying real knowledge — to their people.
April 5 2011 — testing for playground radiation
April 5 2011 — testing begins for playground radiation, twenty five days after nuclear plants damaged.

Children have been allowed to play outside even in the most vulnerable radiation threat areas.

Children used as PR — children used as public relation images to make believe that nothing is wrong, that the government has not brought harm.

TEPCO brings nuclear harm.

Japan Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant radiation cloud blankets western US in levels slightly lower than that over much of Japan outside Fukushima concentrated radiation area.

Although xenon is not toxic, its compounds such as 133Xe can be highly toxic.

Xenon xe-133 is a radionuclide that is inhaled to assess pulmonary function, and to image the lungs.

It is also often used to image blood flow, particularly in the brain.

Xe-133 is also an important fission product.

131mXe, 133Xe, 133mXe, and 135Xe are some of the fission products of both 235U and 239Pu, and therefore used as indicators of nuclear explosions.

Relatively high concentrations of radioactive xenon isotopes are also found emanating from nuclear reactors due to the release of this fission gas from 
cracked fuel rods or fissioning of uranium in cooling water.

The concentrations of these isotopes are still usually low compared to naturally occurring radioactive noble gases such as 222Rn.

Image: Internet
Most parents having real knowledge would not have allowed their children to go to these schools or allowed to play outside.
Non-contaminated seeweed, kelp or other substances, would have been found to give to their children.
The Japan government like all governments have as their first interest their own preservation.
People are not given facts.
Everything is done to avoid supplying the ordinary person information needed for them to evaluate and take action.
And the ordinary person, brainwashed by television and a controlled media, have no awareness of this.
One can only ask if the drinking of milk in the US will not begin to affect some children, for some children are much more vulnerable than others.
Iodine has a half life of days, but it is still around, a half life means still present except in lower radioactive danger.
Cesium 137 has a half life of 30.17 years.   These two harmful substances are now flowing around the world as are many more radioactive emissions from the Japan reactors, radioactive substances too numerous to mention.
For some people the smallest amounts of human caused radiation will bring harm.
Then — as these radiation levels begin to increase even slightly — more people will begin to experience harm.
But we do not know the increased levels of radiation in the country that we live, or around the world, because the governments are not providing us with the data.
We cannot evaluate because we do not have the facts.
All governments have as their first interest their own preservation.
You and your children are second, a poor second!
Do not forget that!
Kewe
Tsunami earthquake warning stones placed all around the shores of Japan by previous generations reaching back many hundreds and millenia of years.

Japan Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant radiation cloud blankets western US in levels slightly lower than that over much of Japan outside Fukushima concentrated radiation area.

Although xenon is not toxic, its compounds such as 133Xe can be highly toxic..

Xenon xe-133 is a radionuclide that is inhaled to assess pulmonary function, and to image the lungs.

It is also often used to image blood flow, particularly in the brain.

Xe-133 is also an important fission product.

131mXe, 133Xe, 133mXe, and 135Xe are some of the fission products of both 235U and 239Pu, and therefore used as indicators of nuclear explosions.

Relatively high concentrations of radioactive xenon isotopes are also found emanating from nuclear reactors due to the release of this fission gas from 
cracked fuel rods or fissioning of uranium in cooling water.

The concentrations of these isotopes are still usually low compared to naturally occurring radioactive noble gases such as 222Rn.

Image: Internet
Tsunami earthquake warning stones placed all around the shores of Japan by previous generations reaching back many hundreds and millenia of years.
Latest forecast has all of California under nuclear radiation higher levels from Xenon Xe-133 April 6 and 7 2011

Japan Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant radiation cloud blankets western US in levels slightly lower than that over much of Japan outside Fukushima concentrated radiation area.

Although xenon is not toxic, its compounds such as 133Xe can be highly toxic..

Xenon xe-133 is a radionuclide that is inhaled to assess pulmonary function, and to image the lungs.

It is also often used to image blood flow, particularly in the brain.

Xe-133 is also an important fission product.

131mXe, 133Xe, 133mXe, and 135Xe are some of the fission products of both 235U and 239Pu, and therefore used as indicators of nuclear explosions.

Relatively high concentrations of radioactive xenon isotopes are also found emanating from nuclear reactors due to the release of this fission gas from 
cracked fuel rods or fissioning of uranium in cooling water.

The concentrations of these isotopes are still usually low compared to naturally occurring radioactive noble gases such as 222Rn.

Image: Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), April 4, 2011
Latest forecast has all of California under nuclear radiation higher levels April 6 and 7 2011
Japan Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant radiation cloud blankets western US in levels slightly lower than that over much of Japan outside the Tokyo Fukushima concentrated radiation area.
Latest forecast has all of California under nuclear radiation higher levels from Xenon Xe-133 April 6 and 7 2011

Japan Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant radiation cloud blankets western US in levels slightly lower than that over much of Japan outside Fukushima concentrated radiation area.

Although xenon is not toxic, its compounds such as 133Xe can be highly toxic.

Xenon xe-133 is a radionuclide that is inhaled to assess pulmonary function, and to image the lungs.

It is also often used to image blood flow, particularly in the brain.

Xe-133 is also an important fission product.

131mXe, 133Xe, 133mXe, and 135Xe are some of the fission products of both 235U and 239Pu, and therefore used as indicators of nuclear explosions.

Relatively high concentrations of radioactive xenon isotopes are also found emanating from nuclear reactors due to the release of this fission gas from 
cracked fuel rods or fissioning of uranium in cooling water.

The concentrations of these isotopes are still usually low compared to naturally occurring radioactive noble gases such as 222Rn.

Image: Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), April 4, 2011
Xenon xe-133 is a radionuclide that is inhaled to assess pulmonary function, and to image the lungs.
It is also often used to image blood flow, particularly in the brain.
Xe-133 is also an important fission product.
131mXe, 133Xe, 133mXe, and 135Xe are some of the fission products of both 235U and 239Pu, and therefore used as indicators of nuclear explosions.
Relatively high concentrations of radioactive xenon isotopes are also found emanating from nuclear reactors due to the release of this fission gas from cracked fuel rods or fissioning of uranium in cooling water.
The concentrations of these isotopes are still usually low compared to naturally occurring radioactive noble gases such as 222Rn.
Although xenon is not toxic, its compounds such as 133Xe can be highly toxic.
133Xe has a physical half-life of 5.243 days or becomes almost nonexistent in 52 days.
Cs-137 has a half-life of 30.17 years.
Cesium 137 levels over Japan April 4 2011

Latest forecast has all of California under nuclear radiation threat from Xenon Xe-133 April 6 and 7 2011

Japan Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant radiation cloud blankets western US in levels slightly lower than that over much of Japan outside Fukushima concentrated radiation area.

Although xenon is not toxic, its compounds such as 133Xe can be highly toxic.

Xenon xe-133 is a radionuclide that is inhaled to assess pulmonary function, and to image the lungs.

It is also often used to image blood flow, particularly in the brain.

Xe-133 is also an important fission product.

131mXe, 133Xe, 133mXe, and 135Xe are some of the fission products of both 235U and 239Pu, and therefore used as indicators of nuclear explosions.

Relatively high concentrations of radioactive xenon isotopes are also found emanating from nuclear reactors due to the release of this fission gas from 
cracked fuel rods or fissioning of uranium in cooling water.

The concentrations of these isotopes are still usually low compared to naturally occurring radioactive noble gases such as 222Rn.

Image: db.eurad.uni-koeln.de
IAEA confirms levels of contamination far from reactors
Concentration per area of long-lived cesium-137 (Cs-137) is extremely high as far as tens of kilometers from the release site at Fukushima Dai-Ichi, and in fact would trigger compulsory evacuation under IAEA guidelines.
The IAEA is reporting that measured soil concentrations of Cs-137 in Iitate Village, 40 kilometers northwest of Fukushima-Dai-Ichi, correspond to deposition levels of up to 3.7 megabecquerels per square meter (MBq/sq. m).
Deposition level that triggered compulsory relocation in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident: the level set in 1990 by the Soviet Union was 1.48 MBq/sq. m.
No 'safe' threshold for radiation
Anna Salleh
ABC
Thursday, 31 March 2011
As Japanese authorities work to contain radiation at Fukushima, concerns have been raised about public communication on radiation risk.
The US advocacy group,
Physicians for Social Responsiblity, recently criticised press reports implying there is a safe threshold for ionizing radiation exposure.
As the crisis in Japan goes on, there are an increasing number of sources reporting that 100 mSv (millisieverts) is the lowest dose at which a person is at risk for cancer," says a statement from the organisation.
No safe threshold for radiation: experts
Established research disproves this claim.
According to the
National Academy of Sciences, there are no safe doses of radiation.
Decades of research show clearly that any dose of radiation increases an individual's risk for the development of cancer.
Associate Professor Tilman Ruff of University of Melbourne's Nossal Institute for Global Health says there may be a threshold for some effects of radiation, but not for cancer.
Ruff, who is also a member of the
International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War:
There is unfortunately a continuing tirade of statements by self-interested parties and some official agencies ... implying a threshold for radiation exposure below which there are no adverse consequences.
Overplaying or underplaying risk?
While some are concerned about the media downplaying the risk of radiation, others think the opposite is occuring.
For example, the UK
Science Media Centre says the media has been giving a much more dire impression of the seriousness of damage to the Fukushima power plant than scientists.
Peter Burns, former acting CEO of Australia's nuclear safety agency,
ARPANSA says the media lack scientific understanding and coverage has tended to overplay the health effects from small amounts of radiation.
Burns, a former chair of
United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR):
It's probably been a bit over the top because of a lack of understanding about what the measurements really mean."
Dose and effect
But on the question of whether there is a safe threshold for exposure to radioactivity, Burns agrees with Ruff.
"There is no level below which we believe radiation effects can't occur," says Burns.
He says the oft-cited effect 'threshold' of 100 millisieverts comes from the most statistically-significant results from studies of Hiroshima and Nagasaki bomb survivors.
According to international agencies, 100 millisieverts corresponds to a risk of serious cancer of less than 1 per cent.
But Burns says there is other evidence that supports the adverse effects of low doses of radiation, including studies showing an increased risk in foetuses getting cancer later in life from a mother's one-off 10 millisievert medical scan.
Risk comparisons
Burns believes it is important to put radiation exposure into context given natural and other man-made sources of radiation we are exposed to.
"We all get between 1 to 10 millisieverts a year - an average 2 to 3 millisieverts - from background radiation," says Burns.
Air travel and CT scans are other common sources.
Official limits for radiation in food and water are set in the context of such exposures.
For example, the limit for nuclear workers is much higher than for the general public.
Ruff says it's important to remember radiation limits like this are not levels below which there is no effect.
"They're just a practical compromise between what's achievable and what's deemed an acceptable risk," he says.
Ruff says it's also important to remember the impact of radiation is greater on the unborn, infants and children, especially girls, compared to adults.
Contaminated water
The World Health Organization recommends a limit of 10 becquerels of radioactive activity per litre of drinking water, equivalent to a dose of 0.1 millisieverts per year.
After the Fukushima accident, the Japanese government set a maximum water contamination level of 300 for adults, 100 for infants and 3000 for emergency workers.
Following news that Japanese tap water had become contaminated, one expert reportedly advised the Japanese government to prevent public alarm by giving more context when releasing such information.
The expert, Professor Robert Gale of
Imperial College London is reported in The Australian this week as saying he would be happy to drink the water, even if it exceeded the maximum contamination levels set by the Japanese government.
"We live with radioactive water all the time," he was quoted as saying.
Individual versus public health risk
The Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) question Gale's position.
"His position illustrates very neatly the divergence between individual and public health risk," says PSR's Dr Ira Helfand.
The risk to any one individual from drinking water with this much radiation is indeed very low.
The problem comes when 40 million people in the Tokyo water district drink the water and get this much radiation.
Helfand says if the risk of cancer from a low dose exposure is 1 in a million, an individual does not need to take any special precautions.
"But if 40 million get this dose of radiation then 40 of them are going to get cancer," he says.
And they may also be getting radiation in the days ahead from increased levels of radiation in the air, and from radiation contamination of food.
Helfand says it is reasonable to assure the public that they don't need to take individual action if the level of radiation is very low.
"But we should not mislead them that the dose is 'safe' or 'no cause for concern' which is very different," he says.
© 2011 ABC
abc.net.au
March 31, 2011
Stream of experts on TV saying radiation not to worry, that the doses are too low, that the accident is nothing like Chernobyl.
They appear on television, we read their articles in the newspapers.   Fortunately the majority of the public don't believe them.
... I saw him a few times talking down the accident on the television, labelled in the stripe as Professor Richard Wakeford, University of Manchester.
... Early on we saw another, Malcolm Grimston, talking about radiation and health, described as Professor, Imperial College.   Grimston is a psychologist, not a scientist, and his expertise was in examining why the public was frightened of radiation, and how their 'emotional' views could be changed.
But his lack of scientific training didn't stop him explaining on TV and radio how the Fukushima accident was nothing to worry about.
George Monbiot who knows nothing about radiation and health, writing in The Guardian how this accident has actually changed his mind about nuclear power — can this be his Kierkegaard moment?   Has he cracked? — since he now understands and reproduces a criminally misleading graphic to back up his new understanding that radiation is actually OK and we shoudn't worry about it.
Port of Minamisanriku town where 10,000 people are unaccounted
The true scale of the devastion that the tsunami unleashed is clear in this picture of the port city of Minamisanriku town, Japan, where 10,000 people are unaccounted for.

Twenty six thousand people are believed to have died in the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami many of them swept out to sea their bodies never to be found.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Photo: AP
Twenty six thousand people are now believed to have died in the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami, many of them swept out to sea their bodies never to be found.
Pump truck shoots wet concrete
Pump truck requested for Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant in Japan due to possible meltdown of nuclear reactors.

Workers in Chiba Prefecture (Chiba-ken near Tokyo) test the pump truck which shoots wet concrete before it is sent to Fukushima.

The concrete pump truck has been sent from China.
 
Photo: Keystone-Rex Features
Pump truck requested for Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant in Japan due to possible meltdown of nuclear reactors.
Workers in Chiba Prefecture (Chiba-ken near Tokyo) test the pump truck which shoots wet concrete before it is sent to Fukushima.
The concrete pump truck has been sent from China.
From:  When the Fukushima Meltdown Hits Groundwater
The disaster is occurring the opposite way than Chernobyl, which exploded and stopped the reaction.
At Fukushima, the reactions are getting worse.   I suspect three nuclear piles are in meltdown and we will probably get some of it.
If reactor 3 is in meltdown, the concrete under the containment looks like lava.
But Fukushima is not far off the water table.
When that molten mass of self-sustaining nuclear material gets to the water table it won’t simply cool down.
It will explode – not a nuclear explosion, but probably enough to involve the rest of the reactors and fuel rods at the facility.
Pouring concrete on a critical reactor makes no sense — it will simply explode and release more radioactive particulate matter.
The concrete will melt and the problem will get worse.
I emotionally have problems with the nuclear option suggested in the article — but I am neither a scientist nor an engineer!
I am watching — and waiting!
Kewe
Effects of radiation.

Skin - radiation caught in roots of body hair causing skin cancer.

Radiation causing eye cataracts.

Thyroid gland takes in radioactive iodine which radiation can destroy the thyroid gland.

Lung cancer can be caused by radiation.

Breast cancer can be caused by radiation.

Stomach damage of radiation due to intestinal tract lining will cause nausea and bloody vomiting and diarrhea.

Radiation damage to the reproductive system, radiation damage to ovaries and eggs in women, and radiation damage to prostate and testes in men.

Radiation damage to the blood system with sever loss of white blood cells leaving person more susceptible to infection.

Bone marrow damage due to radiation leading to leukemia or aplactic anaemia.

Radiation symptoms after moderate exposure include fever, hair loss, vomiting and diarrhea.
 
Image Reuters graphic- Kinyen Pong
March 28, 2010
Highly radioactive water has leaked from the number two reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi plant reactor turbine building to an a linked underground tunnel.
Radiation readings are showing the radioactive water emits a dosage rate of more than 1,000 millisieverts per hour.
There is estimated to be several thousand cubic metres of this radiactive water inside the tunnel.
Each reactor turbine building is connected to a maintenance tunnel large enough for workers to walk through.
The radioactive water in the tunnel at the last check was one metre (three feet) form the top of a 15.9-metre access shaft which is located 55 metres from the sea.
This water could overflow through the shaft into the sea.
From Kewe
Many people have a natural deficiency in iodine.
This is especially important for the thyroid gland which will suck out of the air any radioactive iodine it can find to replenish this deficiency.
Even small amount of iodine intake can help to prevent this.
3 x tablets of kelp that have 125 micrograms of iodine will help to prevent intake of dosages of radioactive iodine from the air.
While the governments are saying that radioactive iodine levels in the atmosphere are low for place far removed from Japan, they are neglecting to state that a kelp tablet, or three as I recommend, could help form a prophylactic thyroid gland inhibitor to low levels of radioactive iodine.
Kelp itself with many trace minerals is beneficial to the body and is recommended to be taken daily for health.
Potassium iodine KI at 125 milligram levels should only be ingested when there is knowledge of a pulse of high iodine content forthcoming in the air, and should only be taken while this pulse is flowing overhead.     At such times it is also recommended to remain indoors.     125 milligram levels of iodine can have harmful effects if taken over more than a few days.
Kelp tablets that contain 125 micrograms of iodine however, taken even as much as 3 to five tablets daily, can have long term health benefits both for the thyroid gland and the rest of the body, especially as many people due to incorrect food intake have a deficiency in iodine and trace minerals.
March 27, 2011
Nuclear radiation 1 sievert per hour at reactor 2 Fukushima Daiichi
Radiation from leaking water at reactor 2 has been measured at 1,000 millisieverts per hour — 10 million times higher [TEPCO reporting error should be 'extremely high figure of 100,000 times'] than when the plant is operating normally
Water of the turbine building next to reactor 2 measured 1000 millisievert per hour
'High levels of caesium and other substances are being detected, which usually should not be found in reactor water.   There is a high possibility that fuel rods are being damaged.'
Workers trying to cool reactor core to avoid meltdown have been evacuated to prevent exposure to radiation
Radiation from leaking water at reactor 2 has been measured at 1,000 millisieverts per hour — extremely high figure of a hundred thousand times than when the plant is operating normally.

It is highly likely the fuel rods have been damaged and high levels of radioactive materials leaked in the water.

Fukushima radioactive fallout nears Chernobyl levels.

The Fukushima plant has  about 1760 tonnes of fresh and used nuclear fuel on site - an unknown amount has been damaged

The Chernobyl reactor had about 180 tonnes of fresh and used nuclear fuel.

Japan's damaged nuclear plant in Fukushima has been emitting radioactive iodine and caesium at levels approaching those seen in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident in 1986.

The daily amount of caesium-137 released from Fukushima Daiichi is around 60 per cent of the amount released from Chernobyl.

Image MajiroxNews.com
“It is highly likely the fuel rods have been damaged and high levels of radioactive materials leaked in the water,” said Naoto Sekimura, professor of atomic energy at Tokyo University.
“I believe the leak is coming from the pipes and valves.”
Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant Japan prior to 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Radiation from leaking water at reactor 2 has been measured at 1,000 millisieverts per hour —  extremely high figure of a hundred thousand times than when the plant is operating normally.

It is highly likely the fuel rods have been damaged and high levels of radioactive materials leaked in the water.

Fukushima radioactive fallout nears Chernobyl levels.

The Fukushima plant has  about 1760 tonnes of fresh and used nuclear fuel on site - an unknown amount has been damaged

The Chernobyl reactor had about 180 tonnes of fresh and used nuclear fuel.

Japan's damaged nuclear plant in Fukushima has been emitting radioactive iodine and caesium at levels approaching those seen in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident in 1986.

The daily amount of caesium-137 released from Fukushima Daiichi is around 60 per cent of the amount released from Chernobyl.

Image Internet
Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant Japan prior to 9.0 earthquake and tsunami
Radiation from leaking water at reactor 2 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant has been measured at 1 Sievert per hour
1 sievert (Sv) = 100 rem or 1000 millisievert (mSv) = 1000000 microSievert (microSv)
1 x Chest X ray = 0.02 mSv or 20 microSv
CT Scan of the abdomen (500 Chest X-rays) = 10 millisievert (mSv) or 10000 microSievert (microSv)   (0.4% of current cancers are estimated to be due to previous CT scans — Wikipedia)
~10 rem or 0.1 Sv or 100 mSv or 100,000 microSv dosage per hour may begin to effect bodily cellular change with no radiation suit protection.
~100 rem or 1 Sv or 1,000 mSv or 1,000,000 microSv in a single dosage will induce radiation sickness such as nausea and vomiting.
Normal non-human produced radiation can be as low as 0.23 microSievert per hour exposure in such places as La Paz, Bolivia.
For moving gif click on image — 8mg download
RADIATION FALLOUT FROM FUKUSHIMA

Image: zamg.ac.at
RADIATION FALLOUT FROM FUKUSHIMA
Accident in the Japanese Nuclear Power Plant Fukushima Daiichi
Current calculation of the 60 certified radionuclide stations in the CTBTO global network data showing global spread of air masses originating from Japan — updated 25 March 2011 16:00
Fukushima radioactive fallout
nears Chernobyl levels
The Fukushima plant has 1760 tonnes of fresh
and used nuclear fuel on site
An unknown amount has been damaged
The Chernobyl reactor had 180 tonnes
Child with birth defects after Chernobyl

Fukushima radioactive fallout nears Chernobyl levels.

The Fukushima plant has  about 1760 tonnes of fresh and used nuclear fuel on site - an unknown amount has been damaged

The Chernobyl reactor had about 180 tonnes of fresh and used nuclear fuel.

Japan's damaged nuclear plant in Fukushima has been emitting radioactive iodine and caesium at levels approaching those seen in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident in 1986.

Austrian researchers have used a worldwide network of radiation detectors – designed to spot clandestine nuclear bomb tests – to show that iodine-131 is being released at daily levels 73 per cent of those seen after the 1986 disaster.

The daily amount of caesium-137 released from Fukushima Daiichi is around 60 per cent of the amount released from Chernobyl.

Photo Internet
Child with birth defects after Chernobyl
In 2006 I visited the still highly contaminated areas of Ukraine and the Belarus border where much of the radioactive plume from Chernobyl descended on 26 April 1986.
It was grim.
We went from hospital to hospital and from one contaminated village to another.
We found deformed and genetically mutated babies in the wards; pitifully sick children in the homes; adolescents with stunted growth and dwarf torsos; foetuses without thighs or fingers and villagers who told us every member of their family was sick.
This was 20 years after the accident but we heard of many unusual clusters of people with rare bone cancers.
One doctor, in tears, told us that one in three pregnancies in some places was malformed and that she was overwhelmed by people with immune and endocrine system disorders.
Others said they still saw caesium and strontium in the breast milk of mothers living far from the areas thought to be most affected, and significant radiation still in the food chain. Villages testified that 'the Chernobyl necklace' — thyroid cancer — was so common as to be unremarkable; many showed signs of accelerated ageing.
The doctors and scientists who have dealt directly with the catastrophe said that the UN International Atomic Energy Agency's 'official' toll, through its Chernobyl Forum, of 50 dead and perhaps 4,000 eventual fatalities was insulting and grossly simplistic.
Burning resentment at the UN
The Ukrainian Scientific Centre for Radiation, which estimated that infant mortality increased 20 to 30% after the accident, said their data had not been accepted by the UN because it had not been published in a major scientific journal.
Konstantin Tatuyan, one of the 'liquidators' who had helped clean up the plant, told us that nearly all his colleagues had died or had cancers of one sort or another, but that no one had ever asked him for evidence.
There was burning resentment at the way the UN, the industry and ill-informed pundits had played down the catastrophe.
John Vidal
Children with birth defects after Chernobyl

Fukushima radioactive fallout nears Chernobyl levels.

The Fukushima plant has  about 1760 tonnes of fresh and used nuclear fuel on site - an unknown amount has been damaged

The Chernobyl reactor had about 180 tonnes of fresh and used nuclear fuel.

Japan's damaged nuclear plant in Fukushima has been emitting radioactive iodine and caesium at levels approaching those seen in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident in 1986.

Austrian researchers have used a worldwide network of radiation detectors – designed to spot clandestine nuclear bomb tests – to show that iodine-131 is being released at daily levels 73 per cent of those seen after the 1986 disaster.

The daily amount of caesium-137 released from Fukushima Daiichi is around 60 per cent of the amount released from Chernobyl.

Photo Internet
Children with birth defects after Chernobyl
March 25, 2011
The damaged nuclear plant in Fukushima Japan has been emitting radioactive iodine and caesium at levels approaching those seen in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident in 1986.
Austrian researchers have used a worldwide network of radiation detectors — designed to spot clandestine nuclear bomb tests — to show that iodine-131 is being released at daily levels 73 percent of those seen after the 1986 disaster.
The daily amount of caesium-137 released from Fukushima Daiichi is around 60 percent of the amount released from Chernobyl.
The difference between the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan and Chernobyl is that at Chernobyl a huge fire released large amounts of many radioactive materials including fuel particles in smoke.
At the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan only volatile elements such as iodine and caesium are bubbling off the damaged fuel.
But these substances could nevertheless pose a significant health risk outside the plant.
Each day, readings for iodine-131 at Sacramento in California, or at Takasaki, both suggested the same amount of iodine was coming out of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan: 1.2 to 1.3 × 1017 becquerels per day.
In the 10 days it burned, Chernobyl put out 1.76 × 1018 becquerels of iodine-131, which amounts to only 50 per cent more per day than has been calculated for Fukushima Daiichi.
The Sacramento readings suggest the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan has emitted 5 × 1015 becquerels of caesium-137 per day.
Chernobyl put out 8.5 × 1016 of caesium-137 in total — around 70 per cent more per day.
The Fukushima plant has ~1760 tonnes of fresh and used nuclear fuel on site, and an unknown amount has been damaged.
The Chernobyl reactor had ~180 tonnes.
It is not yet clear how long emissions from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan will continue.
March 23 2011
Tokyo water is now unfit for babies due to high radiation!
Though most babies would have to consume much more water than they normally do, there is long term danger due to the size of the thyroid gland relative to the new body, and the future years of the body to develop complications from the radioactive iodine poisoning!
Next on the human list for radiation poisoning are children, those younger first, then older children!
Next on the list are young adults!
Other life forms — depending upon size and susceptibility and especially their youth — are being effected!
Human induced radiation poisoning in low dosages is now circulating around the planet!
Kewe
'We continue to see radiation coming from the site'
The damaged Fukushima Daiichi plant - radiation coming from the site, March 23 2011

MASSIVE NUCLEAR STORAGE DUMP of of spent fuel

There is not merely six nuclear reactors at Fukushima Daiichi plant!

There is a MASSIVE NUCLEAR STORAGE DUMP at less that 3 meters above sea level in a highly seismic tsunami prone area!

Now nuclear contamination is spreading around the planet!

Not the adults and those near to leaving who are the most vulnerable!

It is Earth's small ones, the new-born animals, the cubs, the chicklets, the smallest and most vulnerable of the world's vast life that will breath in these toxins and will suffer!

It is also the children of humans, and the babies, the smallest and most vulnerable of the human species — these are the ones who in future years will begin to see the judgement!

Photo Internet
Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Storage Dump
Destroyed buildings and vehicles seen off the coast of north-eastern Japan, in Miyagi Prefecture after the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Photo ChinaFotoPress
MASSIVE NUCLEAR STORAGE DUMP
So the picture is becoming clear!
There is not merely six nuclear reactors at Fukushima Daiichi plant!
There is a MASSIVE NUCLEAR STORAGE DUMP of spent fuel at less that 3 meters above sea level in a highly seismic tsunami prone area!
The Fukushima plant has ~1760 tonnes of fresh and used nuclear fuel on site, and an unknown amount has been damaged.
The Chernobyl reactor had ~180 tonnes.
Now nuclear contamination is spreading around the planet!
It is not the adults and those near to leaving who are the most vulnerable!
It is Earth's small ones, the new-born animals, the cubs, the chicklets, the smallest and most vulnerable of the world's vast life that will breath in these toxins and will suffer!
It is also
the children of humans, and the babies, the smallest and most vulnerable of the human species, a percentage statistic as the present vaccine autistic folly, children to be thrown away — these unfortunate are the ones who have become selected to see this new judgement!
For even in the minutest human-produced radiation amounts, these vulnerable ones are the receivers.
Normal non-human produced radiation can be as low as 0.23 microSievert per hour exposure in such places as La Paz, Bolivia.
Readings taken at the front entrance of the No. 1 Fukushima plant have reached 0.59 microSievert prior to the 9.0 earthquake tsunami, but this is also considered within the 'normal' range.
Kyodo news is reporting a reading by the IAEA International Atomic Energy Agency March 22 2011 in the town of Namie Fukushima Prefecture 20 kilometers from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant as being 161 microSieverts per hour — 1600 times the 'normal' level for the area.
And so it continues....
TEPCO, the Japan government, the Japan bureaucracy, the money behind the building of the US GE nuclear plants — a plant design that even the reviewers resigned knowing its imperfections!
ALL ARE RESPONSIBLE!
Dale G. Bridenbaugh and two of his colleagues at General Electric resigned from their jobs after becoming increasingly convinced that the nuclear reactor design they were reviewing — the Mark 1 — was so flawed it could lead to a devastating accident.
And at the heart of course the
US Empire itself:   This is the Japan imbecility, the world's curse, of placing trust in an elite who rule — the power that knows nothing of value but 'MONEY!'
Kewe
Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Storage Dump
The damaged third (left) and fourth reactors at the Fukushima power plant.

MASSIVE NUCLEAR STORAGE DUMP of of spent fuel

There is not merely six nuclear reactors at Fukushima Daiichi plant!

There is a MASSIVE NUCLEAR STORAGE DUMP at less that 3 meters above sea level in a highly seismic tsunami prone area!

Now nuclear contamination is spreading around the planet!

Not the adults and those near to leaving who are the most vulnerable!

It is Earth's small ones, the new-born animals, the cubs, the chicklets, the smallest and most vulnerable of the world's vast life that will breath in these toxins and will suffer!

It is also the children of humans, and the babies, the smallest and most vulnerable of the human species — these are the ones who in future years will begin to see the judgement!

For even in the smallest amounts, these vulnerable ones are the receivers.

TEPCO, the Japan government, the Japan bureaucracy, the money behind the building of the US GE nuclear plants — plant design that even the reviewers resigned knowing its imperfections!

ALL ARE RESPONSIBLE!

Dale G. Bridenbaugh and two of his colleagues at General Electric resigned from their jobs after becoming increasingly convinced that the nuclear reactor design they were reviewing — the Mark 1 — was so flawed it could lead to a devastating accident.

And at the heart of course the US Empire itself:   This is the Japan folly, the world's folly, of placing trust in an elite who rule, the power that knows nothing of value but 'MONEY!'  

Photo AFP/Getty
From Bobata, 40km (25 miles) distance to the Fukushima plant:
No-one goes outside any more, the roads are so quiet.
I only keep in touch with my family and friends so we don't know the extent of the exclusion zone.
A lot of people's left okay but it's so scary.
You don't know what to do.
It's terrible!
A passing car edges along a tear in the road in Futaba, Fukushima prefecture after the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo EPA
Futaba, Fukushima prefecture
From the Fukushima radiation exclusion zone a phone call from Iwaki.
Iwaki-shi and Minamisoma-shi are now totally cut off the supply.
People are about to starve and freeze to death.
No media coverage, no relief operation, because they fear radiation.
We cannot move because there is no petrol.
Please do not ignore us!
March 18, 2011
0400 in Japan 19 March 2011 and the temperature is just below zero in Fukushima.
Nearly 400,000 people are spending another night in shelters in the north-east, where supplies of food, water, medicine and heating fuel are becoming non-existent.
As day breaks on Saturday steam is rising from unit 3.
Water in that fuel pool is believed to be dangerously low.
Radiation suits at Fukushima Daiichi after the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, March 2011.

The Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Twenty six thousand people are believed to have died in the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami many of them swept out to sea their bodies never to be found.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Photo yomiuri-online
Nuclear alert level raised because:
The cooling function was lost and the reactor cores were damaged.
Radioactive particles continue to be released in the environment.
Radiation levels drop slightly after water cannon.
NE monitoring point: 3,339 μSv/h at 1450 from 3,484 μSv/h at 1350 — TEPCO via NHK
1 x μSv is a microSievert or microSv.  It is one millionth of a Sievert.
~10 rem or 0.1 Sv or 100 mSv or 100,000 microSv dosage per hour may begin to effect bodily cellular change with no radiation suit protection.
~100 rem or 1 Sv or 1,000 mSv or 1,000,000 microSv in a single dosage will induce radiation sickness such as nausea and vomiting.
Normal non-human produced radiation can be as low as 0.23 microSievert per hour exposure in such places as La Paz, Bolivia.
Readings taken at the front entrance of the No. 1 Fukushima plant have reached 0.59 microSievert prior to the 9.0 earthquake tsunami, but this is also considered within the 'normal' range.
Japanese authorities have informed the IAEA that engineers were able have begun to lay an external grid power line cable to Unit 2.
The operation was continuing as of 20:30 UTC March 17, 2011
Temperatures of the spent nuclear fuel pools at Units 4, 5 and 6 at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant update 18 March 2011, 06:10 UTC:
Unit 4
17 March, 18:00 UTC: no data
Unit 5
17 March, 03:00 UTC: 64.2 °C
17 March, 18:00 UTC: 65.5 °C
Unit 6
17 March, 03:00 UTC: 62.5 °C
17 March, 18:00 UTC: 62.0 °C
Automatic teller machine problems in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake is expected to have affected more than 1 million transactions.
Sendai airport now open to emergency vehicles, airplanes and helicopters.
08:00 UTC 18 March — operation to fix external power supply to the Fukushima Daiichi plant is currently under way but functions have not yet been restored.
A boy waits in a line in front of a gas station in Kamaishi, northern Japan Monday, March 14, 2011 after the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Photo AP
A boy holds up his hands while being checked for radiation after the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

Devastated by an earthquake and tsunami in Sendai, Japan, March 2011, the Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo Reuters
Being rescued after the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Photo Reuters
Being rescued after the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Photo Internet
A man cries after finding his mother has died after the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan.
'Sorry!   Sorry!'  the son cries, wishing he could have saved his mother
Daughter cries as she holds the hand of her dead mother in the rubble
near the spot where her home used to be in Rikuzentakata, after the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan.
 
Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Photo AP
Daughter cries as she holds the hand of her dead mother in the rubble near the spot where her home used to be
A MOX fuel storage pool inside the Tokyo Electric Power CO's TEPCO Fukushima No.1 plant third reactor building at Okuma town.
 
The Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Twenty six thousand people are believed to have died in the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami many of them swept out to sea their bodies never to be found.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Photo AP
MOX fuel storage pool prior to earthquake
March 17, 2011
Choppers resumed water drops on the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
Radiation level was 4.13 millisievert per hour at an altitude of 1,000 feet.
Water cannons are being used to try to fill the spent fuel storage pool at Reactor 4.   The cannon are thought to be strong enough to allow crews to remain a safe distance from the starge pool.
Radiation level unchanged despite choppers dousing reactor — Kyodo News quoting Tepco.
MOX
Pressure is rising again at Reactor 3 — the reactor that used MOX:   a blend of plutonium and uranium that will be any combination of natural uranium, reprocessed uranium, depleted uranium.
The temperature of Reactor 5 has become a growing concern:   'The level of water in the reactor is lowering and the pressure is rising.'
Water cannon use on March 17, 2011 to help release water on the Fukushima nuclear power plant has been halted because of high radiation levels.
Sattelite view of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Japan, March 2011

The Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo Reuters/Digital Globe
'It's cold today so many people have fallen ill, getting diarrhoea and other symptoms,' a doctor in Otsuchi says.
Concern over the radiation issuing from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Japan, March 2011.

The Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo AP
The number of partially or completely destroyed buildings considered has reached more than 100,000 according to Japan's fire and disaster management agency
850,000 homes are without any electricity March 17, 2011
One and a half million households have no running water
Destroyed buildings by an earthquake and tsunami in Minamisanriku, Mimamisan, Japan, March 2011.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo Internet
Minamisanriku
Destroyed buildings by an earthquake and tsunami, Japan, March 2011.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo Internet
After the disaster the father found his two children but is still looking for his wife, Isumi.
She fled the tsunami from her coastal home after managing to get her two children to safety.
Then the children lost her!
The father does not know where she is.
He does not know if she was swept away herself with the vast surrounding tide.
The kids keep saying, 'Let's go and find mummy today.'
Then they say: 'if not today we'll find her tomorrow.'
It is what gives me strength to keep on looking for her.
Tsunami flooding from 9.0 earthquake in Iwaki, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, on 11 March 2011

Devastated by an earthquake and tsunami in Sendai, Japan, March 2011, the Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo AP
Iwaki Fukushima prefecture 11 March 2011
Evacuees from 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan carry bowls of soup from a soup kitchen back to their makeshift shelter in Minamisanriku, northern Japan, March 2011

Devastated by an earthquake and tsunami in Sendai, Japan, March 2011, the Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo AP
Evacuees carry bowls of soup back to makeshift shelter
A loved one cries as she searches for her missing nephew from the from 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, in Otsuchi, Iwate prefecture Japan on the 16 March 2011.

Devastated by an earthquake and tsunami in Sendai, Japan, March 2011, the Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo AP
Cries as searches for missing nephew — March 16, 2011
A soldier stands next to a line of bodies found from the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, in Natori, Miyagi prefecture 16 March 2011.

Devastated by an earthquake and tsunami in Sendai, Japan, March 2011, the Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo AFP
Bodies found at Natori in Miyagi prefecture 16 March 2011
Heavy snow falls on a factory area devastated by an earthquake and tsunami in Sendai, Japan, March 2011.

The Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo Reuters
Factory destroyed
Braving snow, homeowners return to Sendai where their home used to be before the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan to search for belongings, March 2011.

The Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo AP
Sendai homeowners return to destroyed homes
Snow falls over the destruction in Sendai, Japan, following the Japan earthquake and tsunami March 2011.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo AP
Sendai
Nuclear spent fuel pool Fukushima Daiichi plant prior to 9.0 earthquake and following tsunami.

The Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Twenty six thousand people are believed to have died in the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami many of them swept out to sea their bodies never to be found.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo Yomiuri-online
Fukushima Daiichi prior to earthquake
US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Gregory Jaczko informed US Congress hearings that water in the spent fuel pool in reactor four at Fukushima Daiichi may no longer be present and that radiation levels are extremely high.
"We believe at this point that Unit Four may have lost a significant inventory, if not lost all, of its wate."
Jaczko said there was the possibility of a crack in the spent fuel pool in reactor No.3, "which could lead to a loss of water in that pool".
The NRC chairman also said the spent fuel pool level in reactor No.2, "is decreasing."
A power line is being laid to the Fukushima Daiichi plant to help restore the reactor cooling systems.
Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco) spokesman Naoki Tsunoda has said it is almost complete.
He stated that engineers plan to test the power line 'as soon as possible.'
Best case scenario is for electric-powered pumps to start to significantly cool overheated reactors and spent fuel storage ponds before radiation contamination has become too widespread and severe.
IAEA data Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant:
Typical spent fuel pool temperature is kept below 25 °C under normal operating conditions.
Unit 5
14 March, 10:08 UTC: 59.7 °C
15 March, 10:00 UTC: 60.4 °C
16 March, 05:00 UTC: 62.7 °C
Unit 6
14 March, 10:08 UTC: 58.0 °C
15 March, 10:00 UTC: 58.5 °C
16 March, 05:00 UTC: 60.0 °C
MOX fuel storage pool Fukushima Daiichi plant prior to 9.0 earthquake and following tsunami, image taken August 21, 2010.

The Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Twenty six thousand people are believed to have died in the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami many of them swept out to sea their bodies never to be found.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo Jiji Press
MOX fuel storage pool Fukushima Daiichi prior to earthquake
Unit 4
14 March, 10:08 UTC: 84 °C
15 March, 10:00 UTC: 84 °C
16 March, 05:00 UTC: no data
The temperature of a spent fuel pool is maintained by constant cooling, which requires a constant power source.
Given the intense heat and radiation that spent fuel assemblies can generate, spent fuel pools must be constantly checked for water level and temperature.
If fuel is no longer covered by water or temperatures reach a boiling point, fuel can become exposed and create a risk of radioactive release.
The concern about the spent fuel pools at Fukushima Daiichi is that sources of power to cool the pools may have been compromised.
Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency told the Kyodo news:
It is concerned about spent fuel storage pool inside the building housing reactor 3 at Fukushima Daiichi.
Pools at reactors 3 and 4 are reportedly boiling.
There may not be water left in reactor 4's pool.
Unless the spent fuel rods are cooled down, they could emit large quantities of radiation.
If cooling operations do not proceed well, the situation will likely 'reach a critical stage in a couple of days.'
752 microSieverts per hour was recorded at Fukushima Daiichi main gate at 1700 on Wednesday, March 16, 2011 (0800 UTC), said Tetsuo Ohmura.
The monitoring point was then changed to the plant's west gate and readings were taken every 30 minutes.
At 0500 (2000 UTC) on Thursday, March 17, 2011, the reading was 338 microSieverts per hour.
~10 rem or 0.1 Sv or 100 mSv or 100,000 microSv dosage per hour may begin to effect bodily cellular change with no radiation suit protection.
~100 rem or 1 Sv or 1,000 mSv or 1,000,000 microSv in a single dosage will induce radiation sickness such as nausea and vomiting.
Normal non-human produced radiation can be as low as 0.23 microSievert per hour exposure in such places as La Paz, Bolivia.
Readings taken at the front entrance of the No. 1 Fukushima plant have reached 0.59 microSievert prior to the 9.0 earthquake tsunami, but this is also considered within the 'normal' range.
1 sievert is a derived unit of radiation dose received in one hour at a distance of 1 cm from a point source of 1 mg of radium in a 0.5 mm thick platinum enclosure.
1 sievert is also defined as that producing the same biological effect in a specified tissue as 1 gray of high-energy x-rays.
Japan soldiers make preparations to wash radioactive material emitted by radiation leaks from Fukushima Daiichi reactors after the 9.0 earthquake and following tsunami.

The Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Twenty six thousand people are believed to have died in the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami many of them swept out to sea their bodies never to be found.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo Kyodo
March 16 2011
"We've been following the news and weather reports very closely.
The official word is that radiation in my area is still far below dangerous levels.
However, the headmaster at the school where my wife teaches received a phone call from a professor he knows at one of Japan's foremost science universities.
He was told that radiation of potentially harmful levels had been detected as far away as Yokohama, which is twice as far from Fukushima as we are.
Right now I'm not sure what to believe."
March 15 2011
A text message from a friend who is trapped by floods on the fifth floor of a university building in Ishinomaki.
"He and his colleagues have very little — or by now possibly no — food, no water and no heating.
I received a text from him at 2100 GMT it read:  'It's bad.   Love to you all'.
It sounds like the last text someone would write if they were dying."
One hundred thousands Japanese soldiers are continuing their search and rescue and recovery following the Japan earthquake and tsunami March 2011.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo AFP
Families are being reunited after the devastating 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan March 2011.

The Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo Reuters
Families being united
Radiation measurement:
1 sievert (Sv) = 100 rem
1 millisievert (mSv) = 100 mrem
1 mSv = .0001 Sv
1 microSievert is a unit of ionizing radiation equal to 10 -6 sieverts
1 microSv = 0.000001 Sv
1 sievert is a derived unit of radiation dose received in one hour at a distance of 1 cm from a point source of 1 mg of radium in a 0.5 mm thick platinum enclosure.
1 sievert is also defined as that producing the same biological effect in a specified tissue as 1 gray of high-energy x-rays.
~10 rem or 0.1 Sv or 100 mSv or 100,000 microSv dosage per hour may begin to effect bodily cellular change with no radiation suit protection.
~100 rem or 1 Sv or 1,000 mSv or 1,000,000 microSv in a single dosage will induce radiation sickness such as nausea and vomiting.
Potassium iodine or KI taken orally even in very small quantities 1/2 hour to 1 day before radioactive iodines are swallowed or inhaled, prevents about 99% of the damage to the thyroid gland from radioactive isotopes of iodine.
Non-radioactive iodine in the blood is absorbed by the thyroid gland to the point of saturation.
When saturated the thyroid absorbs little more than l% additional iodine radioactive or non-radioactive when it is presented.
Greater than 90% of peak radioactive iodine absorption by the thyroid gland can be blocked by the oral administration of Potassium Iodine providing the thyroid gland has had enough time to absorb saturation levels of non-radioactive iodine.
Daily dosages recommended by WHO (World Health Organization) for iodine prophylaxis due to radiation exposure:
Adults over 40 yrs in areas with thyroid exposure to high levels of radiation:   130mg KI
Adults over 18 through 40 yrs in high and moderate exposure to radiation:   130mg KI
Pregnant or lactating women in high, moderate and low exposure to radiation:   130mg KI
All children from birth to adulthood in high, moderate and low exposure to radiation:
Adolescents approaching adult size and those over 12 through 18 yrs:  65mg KI
Children over 3 through 12 yrs:  65mg KI
Babies and children over 1 month through 3 years:  32mg KI
Birth through 1 month:  16mg KI
Older adults are less susceptible to thyroid damage except in high exposure areas.
For younger adults, children and babies:   'The potential benefit of iodine prophylaxis will be greater in the young, firstly because the small size of the thyroid means that a higher radiation dose is accumulated per unit intake of radioactive iodine.
'Secondly, the thyroid of the fetus, neonate and young infant has a higher yearly thyroid cancer risk per unit dose than the thyroid of an adult and, thirdly, the young will have a longer time span for the expression of the increased cancer risk'
Large dosages of Potassium iodine KI can have harmful effects for some if taken over a period of days or weeks so consultation with a medical doctor is recommended.   Iodine prophylaxis is recommended to be used only when their is a real danger of radioactivity forthcoming and then only during the period of radioactivity.
Iodine in 125.mcg 125ul and dosages up to one milligram is recommended daily for most people for the thyroid and is included in many vitamin/mineral supplements.
Present WHO recommendation is 125.mcg microgram 125ul daily of iodine for normal thyroid health.
Child being checked for radiation. 

Radiation is leaking from the from the Fukushima nuclear power plant, and has reached levels high enough to affect human health.

Japan government has reportedly ordered two hundred thousand people to leave the area around the Fukushima nuclear power plant, which was the scene of an explosion and radiation leak on Saturday, March 12 2011 in Japan.

Photo Reuters
Issued March 12 2011 to Accuracy.org
The Institute for Public Accuracy issued the following statement by nuclear expert, Kevin Kamp, about the risk of nuclear disaster in post-Earthquake Japan:
The electrical grid is down.
The emergency diesel generators have been damaged.
The multi-reactor Fukushima atomic power plant is now relying on battery power, which will only last around eight hours.
The danger is, the very thermally hot reactor cores at the plant must be continuously cooled for 24 to 48 hours.
Without any electricity, the pumps won’t be able to pump water through the hot reactor cores to cool them.
Once electricity is lost, the irradiated nuclear fuel could begin to melt down.
If the containment systems fail, a catastrophic radioactivity release to the environment could occur.
In addition to the reactor cores, the storage pool for highly radioactive irradiated nuclear fuel is also at risk.
The pool cooling water must be continuously circulated.
Without circulation, the still thermally hot irradiated nuclear fuel in the storage pools will begin to boil off the cooling water.
Within a day or two, the pool’s water could completely boil away.
Without cooling water, the irradiated nuclear fuel could spontaneously combust in an exothermic reaction.
Since the storage pools are not located within containment, a catastrophic radioactivity release to the environment could occur.
Up to 100 percent of the volatile radioactive Cesium-137 content of the pools could go up in flames and smoke, to blow downwind over large distances.
Given the large quantity of irradiated nuclear fuel in the pool, the radioactivity release could be worse than the Chernobyl nuclear reactor catastrophe of 25 years ago.
Kamps is a specialist in nuclear waste at Beyond Nuclear and conducted research last year assessing the state of nuclear facilities in Japan.
Roofs of three story buildings in Sendai, Miyagi prefecture, are covered with the Japan earthquake tsunami debris.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo AFP
Three story buildings with tsunami debris on roofs — town of Sendai
People run for fear of a tsunami after a tsunami warning is sounded in Natori city, north-east Japan.

The town was mostly swept away by the force of the tsunami from the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, March 2011. 

Thousands of residents are missing.

Photo AFP
Run for fear of new tsunami after warning siran — city of Natori
The town of Rikuzentakata a population of twenty-three thousand people has been almost flattened by the 9.0 earthquake tsunami that took place in Japan, March 2011.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo AP
Rikuzentakata — town of 26,000 people almost completely flattened — unknown how many survivors
Realtives and friends in Otsuchicho, Japan cry for the loss of their loved ones in the Japan earthquake tsunami of March 2011

10,000 people from Otsuchicho are reported as missing.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo AP
Otsuchicho — 10,000 people missing
Something to think about should the radiation news not be good!
The mayor of Tsuruga City home of the trouble-plagued Monju plutonium-breeder reactor in Fukui Prefecture isn't buying Tokyo's weak explanation about the Fukushima 1 blast.    He demanded the Japan Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency to conduct an all-points investigation immediately.
A specialist medical team from the Japan National Radiology Health Institute — flown by helicopter from Chiba to a field center 5 km from the No.1 Nuclear Plant — found radiation illness in 3 residents out of a sample group of 90.    Overnight that number of civilian-nuclear 'hibakusha' shot up to 19, but in other counts to 160.
The evacuation zone has been further widened from 10 km to 20 km.
Fukushima No.2 plant, further south, is ringed by a wall of silence as a quiet evacuation is being conducted.
Firefighters are pumping seawater into the three overheated Fukushima 1 reactors.    The mandatory freshwater supply is missing, presumably due to tsunami contamination from surging ocean waves.
USA:   The White House sent in a team to consult with the US-friendly Naoto Kan government.
Instead of dispatching in experts from the Department of Energy, Nuclear Safety Agency and Health Department, President Obamas sent representatives of USAID, which is cover for the CIA.
PRC:   In contrast to Washington's ulterior motives, China in an unprecedented move has sent in an emergency team into Japan.
Unbeknownst to the world, China has world-leading expertise in extinguishing nuclear meltdowns and blocking radiation leaks at their uranium mines and military nuclear plants.
A Chinese scientist disclosed 'off the record' China's development of mineral blends that block radiation 'much more than 90 percent, nearly totally'.
Russia:   Moscow too is offering unconditional aid despite ongoing territorial conflict with Japan over four northern islands.
The Russian Air Force from bases in Kamchatka and the Kuriles could play a key role in cloud-seeding to prevent radioactive particles from drifting over to the United States.
Mark 1 containment.

Fukushima nuclear power plant. Japan March 2011.

Refueling bay, spent fuel pool, steel containment, reactor vessel, concrete shell drywell, secondary containment, wetwell, torus.

The reactor core is in the reactor vessel, or pressure vessel, which is surrounded by a steel containment vessel. The steel containment vessel is surrounded by a reinforced concrete shell.

It is possible five nuclear reactors have problems.

Image: AllThingsNuclear.org
The reactor core is in the reactor vessel, or pressure vessel, which is surrounded by a steel containment vessel.
The steel containment vessel is surrounded by a reinforced concrete shell.
Image: AllThingsNuclear.org
A wife searches for her missing husband in the port town of Minamisanriku, Miyagi.

The town was mostly swept away by the force of the tsunami from the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, March 2011.

Thousands of residents are missing.

Photo Reuters
Wife searching for missing husband
Ship overturned by the force of the tsunami from the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, March 2011.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo Reuters
Exodus line of cars from the area around the Fukushima nuclear power plant after the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami that took place in Japan, March 2011.

Japan government has reportedly ordered two hundred thousand people to leave the area around the Fukushima nuclear power plant, which was the scene of an explosion and radiation leak on Saturday, March 12 2011 in Japan

Photo AP
Exodus line of cars from road in area around Fukushima
Car and family exodus away from the stricken reactor and rising radiation levels in the town of Kitaibaraki, north of Tokyo after the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami that took place in Japan, March 2011.

The Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Twenty six thousand people are believed to have died in the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami many of them swept out to sea their bodies never to be found.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Huge waves surged up to ten kilometers (six miles) inland, sweeping away buildings, cars and trees, and then retreated back to sea leaving a trail of destruction.

Photo The Yomiuri Shimburi Yugi Furuya
Kitaibaraki
Checking radiation levels as people are evacuated from the area around the Fukushima nuclear power plant, which was the scene of an explosion and radiation leak on Saturday, March 12 2011 in Japan

The Japan government is trying to reassure residents that they are not going to fall sick from the radiation released so far.

Two hundred thousand people have evacuated the areas around the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, estimated four hundred and fifty thousand people are displaced in Japan due to the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.

Photo AP
Map projects the result of leakage from one nuclear reactor in Japan, March 2011.

It is possible five nuclear reactors have problems.

Image: Australian Radiation Services
The map projects the result of possible leakage issuing from one nuclear reactor
Five nuclear reactors may have problems
Image: Australian Radiation Services
200,000 people moved to safety from the areas around the nuclear plants, including these elderly residents of a nursing home in Japan, March 2011.

Photo Reuters
Protective suits in the evacuation and radioactive contamination in Japan, March 2011.

Photo Reuters
Sunrise in Honshu after earthquake and tsunami in Japan, March 2011.

Photo Reuters
Japan 9.0 Earthquake Tsunami
Nuclear Plant destruction
Present
      Radiation emissions continue       
Exposing children to a one in 200 risk of getting cancer
The new acceptable limit exposed children to a one in 200 risk of getting cancer, compared with a one in 500 risk for adults
Municipal water is treated with fluoride and chlorine
Iodine is aerosolized by chlorine vapor for the inhalation pathway and strontium and cesium bond to fluoride for the ingestion pathway
       Radiation is leaking every day now      
       Plutonium and Strontium circulating Northern Hemisphere      
       Milk 1600% Above EPA Drinking Water Limits      
     Erasing information authorities deem harmful to public order      
     “Correctly revealed to the nation”      
More than 80,000 human beings perished in Nagasaki three days after at least that many died in Hiroshima
The Bomb that destroyed this historic city was made of plutonium — Hiroshima atomic bomb was uranium
Whatever the case for bombing Hiroshima it was far weaker for Nagasaki
       Japan military        
       Washington Gives Green Light to Japan militarists       
       Japan frantic over hostage crisis         
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