58,000 American soldiers were killed in the Vietnam War.
Their average age was 19.
From the senior prom to Vietnam.


Oh, where have you been, my blue-eyed son?
Oh, where have you been, my darling young one?
I've stumbled on the side of twelve misty mountains,
I've walked and I've crawled on six crooked highways,
I've stepped in the middle of seven sad forests,
I've been out in front of a dozen dead oceans,
I've been ten thousand miles in the mouth of a graveyard,
And it's a hard, and it's a hard, it's a hard, and it's a hard,
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.
Bob Dylan - Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall

Civilian Killings Went Unpunished
Declassified papers show U.S. atrocities went far beyond My Lai.
By Nick Turse and Deborah Nelson, Special to The Times
August 6, 2006
A hat lies in the mud in modern-day Vietnam.

Recently released archives describe recurrent attacks on ordinary Vietnamese by troops in every Army division in Vietnam.

Photo: LA Times
A hat lies in the mud in modern-day Vietnam.
Recently released archives describe recurrent attacks on ordinary Vietnamese by troops in every Army division in Vietnam.
The men of B Company were in a dangerous state of mind.
They had lost five men in a firefight the day before.
The morning of Feb. 8, 1968, brought unwelcome orders to resume their sweep of the countryside, a green patchwork of rice paddies along Vietnam's central coast.
They met no resistance as they entered a nondescript settlement in Quang Nam province.
So Jamie Henry, a 20-year-old medic, set his rifle down in a hut, unfastened his bandoliers and lighted a cigarette.
Just then, the voice of a lieutenant crackled across the radio.
He reported that he had rounded up 19 civilians, and wanted to know what to do with them.
Henry later recalled the company commander's response:
Kill anything that moves.
Henry stepped outside the hut and saw a small crowd of women and children.
Then the shooting began.
Moments later, the 19 villagers lay dead or dying.
Back home in California, Henry published an account of the slaughter and held a news conference to air his allegations.  
Yet he and other Vietnam veterans who spoke out about war crimes were branded traitors and fabricators.
No one was ever prosecuted for the massacre.
Now, nearly 40 years later, declassified Army files show that Henry was telling the truth — about the Feb. 8 killings and a series of other atrocities by the men of B Company.
The files are part of a once-secret archive, assembled by a Pentagon task force in the early 1970s, that shows that confirmed atrocities by U.S. forces in Vietnam were more extensive than was previously known.
A Vietnam Veteran leaves a powerful statement at the 'Moving Wall' in Salem, Oregon in 1989.

American soldiers got 'Had' in Vietnam by their government.

I did not serve in Vietnam for the cause of freedom, I served Big Business in America for the cause of war profiteering. 

The war in Iraq will be no different.

Words and photo by Mike Hastie

Vietnam Veteran
A Vietnam Veteran leaves a powerful statement at the 'Moving Wall' in Salem, Oregon in 1989.
American soldiers got 'Had' in Vietnam by their government.
I did not serve in Vietnam for the cause of freedom, I served Big Business in America for the cause of war profiteering.
The war in Iraq will be no different.
Words and photo by Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
Images inserted by TheWE.cc
The documents detail 320 alleged incidents that were substantiated by Army investigators — not including the most notorious U.S. atrocity, the 1968 My Lai massacre.
Though not a complete accounting of Vietnam war crimes, the archive is the largest such collection to surface to date.
About 9,000 pages, it includes investigative files, sworn statements by witnesses and status reports for top military brass.
The records describe recurrent attacks on ordinary Vietnamese — families in their homes, farmers in rice paddies, teenagers out fishing.
Hundreds of soldiers, in interviews with investigators and letters to commanders, described a violent minority who murdered, raped and tortured with impunity.
Abuses were not confined to a few rogue units, a Times review of the files found.
They were uncovered in every Army division that operated in Vietnam.
Retired Brig. Gen. John H. Johns, a Vietnam veteran who served on the task force, says he once supported keeping the records secret but now believes they deserve wide attention in light of alleged attacks on civilians and abuse of prisoners in Iraq.
"We can't change current practices unless we acknowledge the past," says Johns, 78.
Among the substantiated cases in the archive:
• Seven massacres from 1967 through 1971 in which at least 137 civilians died.
• Seventy-eight other attacks on noncombatants in which at least 57 were killed, 56 wounded and 15 sexually assaulted.
• One hundred forty-one instances in which U.S. soldiers tortured civilian detainees or prisoners of war with fists, sticks, bats, water or electric shock.
Investigators determined that evidence against 203 soldiers accused of harming Vietnamese civilians or prisoners was strong enough to warrant formal charges.
These "founded" cases were referred to the soldiers' superiors for action.
Ultimately, 57 of them were court-martialed and just 23 convicted, the records show.
Fourteen received prison sentences ranging from six months to 20 years, but most won significant reductions on appeal.
The stiffest sentence went to a military intelligence interrogator convicted of committing indecent acts on a 13-year-old girl in an interrogation hut in 1967.
He served seven months of a 20-year term, the records show.
Copyright 2006 Los Angeles Times
“When our troops eventually leave, no number of "Marines over the horizon," or punishing air strikes, or "battle-ready battalions" of Iraqis will keep the OCCUPIER'S institutions in place.
Resistance, some of it undoubtedly violent, will continue until those institutions are either removed or destroyed.”
Israeli occupation soldiers torturing Palestinian political prisoners in Ofer
Israeli occupation soldiers torturing Palestinian political prisoners in Ofer

Photo: www.aljazeerah.info/Baha Boukhari, Al-Ayyam, 12/1/05
“Consider what Murtha outlined:
A force of Marines "over the horizon" ready at a minute's notice and bombers awaiting presidential orders.
This is a script to make Bush's Iraqization look disturbingly like Nixon's Vietnamization.
And with similar results for the people of Iraq.
The color of the casualties will change and that's about all.”
Mike Ferner served as a Navy corpsman during Vietnam
December 29, 2005
A Family Reunion Disfigured by Death
Christmas Without Chase
By MISSY COMLEY BEATTIE
I just returned to New York City after spending a week in Kentucky with my family.  
This was our first Christmas without Chase, my nephew killed in Iraq five months ago.
We gathered for brunch at the home of my brother, Chase's father.
Many of us dreaded this tradition — a reunion disfigured by death.
Forming a circle and holding hands, we sang the "Johnny Appleseed Grace."
My mother was silent.
She's the one with the opera-quality voice but she can't sing a prayer of thanks anymore.
We do have lots for which to be grateful.
We had lived for years without tragedy.
I tell people that most of my friends have lost either one or both parents, but mine are still alive.
My 86-year-old father is unstable from a stroke and has just been declared legally blind, but he's had a wonderful life.
At least he did — we all did — until Chase was killed in this war that was waged for oil and to ensure the reelection of George W. Bush.
"The few, the proud"
My father desperately tried to talk Chase out of signing with the Marines.
Daddy served with the Army Corps of Engineers and suggested that if Chase insisted on joining, he should opt for the Navy or Coast Guard.
But Chase had listened to the Marine recruiters who said, "The few, the proud," and "Why settle for second best when you can be first?"
He was sold a bill of goods that became a package of death.
In my brother's living room was a "Comfort Quilt" made by military families to present to a fallen troop's next of kin.
I couldn't look at it nor could my mother.
My sister said it was a wonderful tribute to Chase, this man/child who wanted to do something significant.
I picture Chase, boarding that plane that took him 6,000 miles away from his home to the battlefield.
I wonder what he thought as the aircraft ascended.
I see them all and in the image, they're pumped with the training and energy that turns them into warriors.
I think of the hours of flying and, then, the approach and arrival in Iraq.
Did the basic training really prepare Chase for what he saw, heard, lived, felt and was ordered to do?
It seems he was telling us different things.
His calls to his father and my parents were laments.   He was counting the days until he returned.
He knew the exact number.
He said he couldn't wait to come home.
My brother told me that he said to Chase, "I hear things are improving there."
Chase said, "They're not."
He called once when I was at my parents' house, and when I asked if he could speak freely, he said, "No."   This was in June.
He was killed two months later.
Chase already had experienced two close calls when he'd hit roadside bombs that exploded seconds behind his vehicle.
"Barroom bravado"
Some members of the family support Bush and the war.
They say that Chase was proud of what he was doing and believed in his mission.
To his peer group, cousins, sisters, and brother, he was filled with what his father calls "barroom bravado."
I've been criticized for writing what I think Chase thought and felt.
My opinions are based on what Chase said to me, my parents, and my brother on the phone and what he wrote in a letter to his sister that "no parent would want their child over here."
What he said to others, what they believe about his motives and convictions before and after he was there, they can examine and write.
Chase's mother who is divorced from my brother maintains that he told her he was fighting to keep her safe and free.
I have deep feelings for her.   I'm a mother.   I know it would be difficult to admit that your child died for nothing.
I do believe, though, that history will support this horrible truth.
Cindy Sheehan is saying it.   I'm saying it.   My children are saying it.   My parents are saying it.   My brother and sister are saying it.
Gold Star Families for Peace are saying it.
And those analyzing the recent election in Iraq are indicating that a unified country doesn't seem possible.
Certainly, Bush Inc. will find it increasingly difficult to convince Americans that the deaths and injuries are noble sacrifices.
Two million
It took time for us to admit this about Vietnam — a war in which 59,000 Americans died.
And it's estimated that there were more than two million Vietnamese casualties.
An anguished Secretary of Defense, Robert McNamara, in his memoir, apologized for this atrocity.   Will Donald Rumsfeld someday regret the invasion of Iraq?
Because Iraq is Vietnam.   It's painful to say this.   Oh, how I wish we could have talked Chase out of joining.   Many of us tried.
But since we couldn't, I'd like to think that Chase was flown to Dover and then to Lexington, Kentucky to be eulogized for participating in some great cause, but I will never believe this.
Some in my family do.   Is this denial — the way they handle grief?
To me, Chase's sacrifice was meaningless, a move so politically motivated by George Bush that I wonder how anyone could trust that this president has any understanding of the Christianity that he says inspires his every action.
I know I shouldn't judge the religious authenticity of anyone.
But I just can't help it.
Not only do I doubt Bush's sincerity, I also question his humanity.

Civilian Killings Went Unpunished
Declassified papers show U.S. atrocities went far beyond My Lai.
By Nick Turse and Deborah Nelson, Special to The Times
August 6, 2006
“We could have court-martialed them but didn’t,” retired Lt. Gen. Robert G. Gard says of soldiers accused of war crimes in Vietnam.
“We could have court-martialed them but didn’t,” retired Lt. Gen. Robert G. Gard says of soldiers accused of war crimes in Vietnam.
Many substantiated cases were closed with a letter of reprimand, a fine or, in more than half the cases, no action at all.
There was little interest in prosecuting Vietnam war crimes, says Steven Chucala, who in the early 1970s was legal advisor to the commanding officer of the Army's Criminal Investigation Division.   He says he disagreed with the attitude but understood it.
"Everyone wanted Vietnam to go away," says Chucala, now a civilian attorney for the Army at Ft. Belvoir in Virginia.
In many cases, suspects had left the service.   The Army did not attempt to pursue them, despite a written opinion in 1969 by Robert E. Jordan III, then the Army's general counsel, that ex-soldiers could be prosecuted through courts-martial, military commissions or tribunals.
"I don't remember why it didn't go anywhere," says Jordan, now a lawyer in Washington.
Top Army brass should have demanded a tougher response, says retired Lt. Gen. Robert G. Gard, who oversaw the task force as a brigadier general at the Pentagon in the early 1970s.
"We could have court-martialed them but didn't," Gard says of soldiers accused of war crimes.   "The whole thing is terribly disturbing."
Early-Warning System
In March 1968, members of the 23rd Infantry Division slaughtered about 500 Vietnamese civilians in the hamlet of My Lai.   Reporter Seymour Hersh exposed the massacre the following year.
By then, Gen. William C. Westmoreland, commander of U.S. forces in Vietnam at the time of My Lai, had become Army chief of staff.   A task force was assembled from members of his staff to monitor war crimes allegations and serve as an early-warning system.
Over the next few years, members of the Vietnam War Crimes Working Group reviewed Army investigations and wrote reports and summaries for military brass and the White House.
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq

The Sea of Betrayal.

American soldiers got 'Had' in Vietnam by their government.
 
I did not serve in Vietnam for the cause of freedom, I served Big Business in America for the cause of war profiteering. 

Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Words and photo by Mike Hastie

Vietnam Veteran
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.
The Sea of Betrayal
American soldiers got 'Had' in Vietnam by their government.
I did not serve in Vietnam for the cause of freedom, I served Big Business in America for the cause of war profiteering.
Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C.
Words and photo by Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
The records were declassified in 1994, after 20 years as required by law, and moved to the National Archives in College Park, Md., where they went largely unnoticed.
The Times examined most of the files and obtained copies of about 3,000 pages — about a third of the total — before government officials removed them from the public shelves, saying they contained personal information that was exempt from the Freedom of Information Act.
In addition to the 320 substantiated incidents, the records contain material related to more than 500 alleged atrocities that Army investigators could not prove or that they discounted.
Johns says many war crimes did not make it into the archive.   Some were prosecuted without being identified as war crimes, as required by military regulations.
Others were never reported.
In a letter to Westmoreland in 1970, an anonymous sergeant described widespread, unreported killings of civilians by members of the 9th Infantry Division in the Mekong Delta — and blamed pressure from superiors to generate high body counts.
"A batalion [sic] would kill maybe 15 to 20 [civilians] a day.
"With 4 batalions in the brigade that would be maybe 40 to 50 a day or 1200 to 1500 a month, easy," the unnamed sergeant wrote.
"If I am only 10% right, and believe me it's lots more, then I am trying to tell you about 120-150 murders, or a My Lay [sic] each month for over a year."
Copyright 2006 Los Angeles Times
Friday, 2 December 2005
US Marines patrol the streets of Falluja earlier in November
More than two thousand US troops have died in Iraq since the invasion
Ten US marines killed in Falluja
Ten US marines were killed and 11 wounded by a roadside bomb outside the central Iraqi town of Falluja on Thursday, the US military has said.
The soldiers from the 2nd Marine Division were conducting a foot patrol when a bomb exploded, a statement issued on Friday said.
Their combat unit was taking part in a counter-insurgency operation in Anbar Province, west of the capital Baghdad.
The attack was one of the deadliest against US forces since August.
IED [improvised explosive device] fashioned from several large artillery shells," the statement said.
Seven of the wounded soldiers have returned to duty.
"Marines continue to conduct counter-insurgency operations throughout Falluja and surrounding areas to provide a secure environment for the national elections," the statement added.
Map showing Falluja
"The patrol was attacked with an The US military and Iraqi authorities have both warned of an increase in violence in the run-up to the parliamentary elections on 15 December.
Politically sensitive
The attack is the deadliest against US forces in Iraq since 14 marines were killed by a roadside bomb in Haditha in August.
The Pentagon says 2,125 US troops have now been killed and nearly 16,000 wounded in combat since 2003.
Unusually, the first announcement of the Falluja attack came out of Washington.
The BBC's correspondent in Baghdad, Jim Muir, says these are politically sensitive times when it comes to troop losses.
Falluja was the scene of a massive American led operation against the insurgents just over a year ago.
It was meant to be a showcase for a campaign of clearing, controlling and rebuilding areas once considered hotbeds of the insurgency, our correspondent says.
The deaths also came just one day after President Bush's major speech outlining his strategy for victory in Iraq.
DEADLIEST INCIDENTS
3 August 2005: 14 US Marines are killed in a roadside blast near Haditha, north-west of Baghdad
26 January 2005: 31 US Marines are killed when their helicopter comes down in bad weather in western Iraq
21 December 2004: 14 US troops are among at least 21 killed by a suicide bomber in a mess tent in Mosul
15 November 2003: 17 US soldiers are killed when their helicopters collide under heavy fire in Mosul
2 November 2003: At least 15 US troops are killed when their helicopter is shot down near Falluja

US military death toll in Iraq

These figures are compiled by Iraq Coalition Casualty Count, a website which compiles and cross-references information provided by US military authorities.
US military death toll in Iraq
These figures are compiled by Iraq Coalition Casualty Count, a website which compiles and cross-references information provided by US military authorities.
“You'll recall how nearly every Member of Congress ­ Republican and Democrat alike ­ was struck down apoplectic when Representative Murtha suggested the U.S. withdraw from Iraq?”
Mike Ferner served as a Navy corpsman during Vietnam
I half-expected NPR to exhume Henry Kissinger (he is dead, isn't he?) the other day when they did a promo about a story on "Iraqization."
But no, they spared us the sonorous tones of Doctor Strangelove, only to give us his pin-headed sidekick, former Nixon Defense Secretary, Melvin Laird.
Since it's clearly too much to expect National Pentagon Radio to invite an eminent historian like Howard Zinn or someone of similar ability onto our airwaves to explain the likely pitfalls of Bush's plan to hand over Iraq to our hand-picked Iraqis, it falls to the Itinerant Scribbler Corps to put Laird's interview into historic perspective.
"Eventually we have to get out as soon as our job is done," Laird began, omitting, of course, any mention of exactly what that job might consist of:
Finding WMD's?
Freeing Iraqis from despotic torture chambers?
Militarily securing a strategic, oil-rich region?
Both started the war.
Both want to keep it going.
     Vanity Fair article:     Election stolen for Bush    
     Appointment of U.S. President by the U.S. Supreme Court.        
Former Guantanamo Chaplain James Yee
“One of the most...one of the most emotional things that I might say that I saw down there was the conditions and how they deteriorated within the time frame that I was there, the emotional and mental conditions of the prisoners themselves.
I recall seeing, for example, two detainees permanently residing in the detainee hospital who had become so depressed, so despondent, that they no longer had an appetite and stopped eating to the point where they were force-fed with a tube that is inserted through their nose medically into their stomach and force-fed in that manner.
And I witnessed this tube in the hospital being put in the prisoner's nose who didn't want it in his nose, of course.
And it's a very painful experience.
The prisoner had to be shackled down with handcuffs to both sides of the bed.
A guard had to come back and hold the prisoner's head back and then the medic or the nurse would come and put petroleum jelly on the end of the tube, this plastic tube, in his nose so this tube slides down.
As that happens, you hear the detainee scream out in pain.”
Oh, what did you see, my blue-eyed son?
Oh, what did you see, my darling young one?
I saw a newborn baby with wild wolves all around it,
I saw a highway of diamonds with nobody on it,
I saw a black branch with blood that kept drippin',
I saw a room full of men with their hammers a-bleedin',
I saw a white ladder all covered with water,
I saw ten thousand talkers whose tongues were all broken,
I saw guns and sharp swords in the hands of young children,
And it's a hard, and it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard,
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.
Bob Dylan - Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall

Civilian Killings Went Unpunished
Declassified papers show U.S. atrocities went far beyond My Lai.
By Nick Turse and Deborah Nelson, Special to The Times
August 6, 2006
“Thirty seconds after the shooting stopped, I knew that I was going to do something about it,” said Jamie Henry, who saw many civilians killed.
“Thirty seconds after the shooting stopped, I knew that I was going to do something about it,” said Jamie Henry, who saw many civilians killed.
A high-level Army review of the letter cited its "forcefulness," "sincerity" and "inescapable logic," and urged then-Secretary of the Army Stanley R. Resor to make sure the push for verifiable body counts did not "encourage the human tendency to inflate the count by violating established rules of engagement."
Investigators tried to find the letter writer and "prevent his complaints from reaching" then-Rep. Ronald V. Dellums (D-Oakland), according to an August 1971 memo to Westmoreland.
The records do not say whether the writer was located, and there is no evidence in the files that his complaint was investigated further.
Pvt. Henry
James D. "Jamie" Henry was 19 in March 1967, when the Army shaved his hippie locks and packed him off to boot camp.
He had been living with his mother in Sonoma County, working as a hospital aide and moonlighting as a flower child in Haight-Ashbury, when he received a letter from his draft board.
As thousands of hippies poured into San Francisco for the upcoming "Summer of Love," Henry headed for Ft. Polk, La.
Soon he was on his way to Vietnam, part of a 100,000-man influx that brought U.S. troop strength to 485,000 by the end of 1967.
They entered a conflict growing ever bloodier for Americans — 9,378 U.S. troops would die in combat in 1967, 87% more than the year before.
Henry was a medic with B Company of the 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division.
He described his experiences in a sworn statement to Army investigators several years later and in recent interviews with The Times.
In the fall of 1967, he was on his first patrol, marching along the edge of a rice paddy in Quang Nam province, when the soldiers encountered a teenage girl.
"The guy in the lead immediately stops her and puts his hand down her pants," Henry said.   "I just thought, 'My God, what's going on?' "
A day or two later, he saw soldiers senselessly stabbing a pig.
"I talked to them about it, and they told me if I wanted to live very long, I should shut my mouth," he told Army investigators.
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq

Peace rally in Portland, Oregon on November 17, 2002.

American soldiers got 'Had' in Vietnam by their government. 

I did not serve in Vietnam for the cause of freedom, I served Big Business in America for the cause of war profiteering. 

Words and photo by Mike Hastie

Vietnam Veteran
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.
Peace rally in Portland, Oregon on November 17, 2002.
American soldiers got 'Had' in Vietnam by their government.
I did not serve in Vietnam for the cause of freedom, I served Big Business in America for the cause of war profiteering.
Words and photo by Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
Henry may have kept his mouth shut, but he kept his eyes and ears open.
On Oct. 8, 1967, after a firefight near Chu Lai, members of his company spotted a 12-year-old boy out in a rainstorm.
He was unarmed and clad only in shorts.
"Somebody caught him up on a hill, and they brought him down and the lieutenant asked who wanted to kill him," Henry told investigators.
Two volunteers stepped forward.   One kicked the boy in the stomach.
The other took him behind a rock and shot him, according to Henry's statement.
They tossed his body in a river and reported him as an enemy combatant killed in action.
Three days later, B Company detained and beat an elderly man suspected of supporting the enemy.
He had trouble keeping pace as the soldiers marched him up a steep hill.
"When I turned around, two men had him, one guy had his arms, one guy had his legs and they threw him off the hill onto a bunch of rocks," Henry's statement said.
On Oct. 15, some of the men took a break during a large-scale "search-and-destroy" operation.
Henry said he overheard a lieutenant on the radio requesting permission to test-fire his weapon, and went to see what was happening.
He found two soldiers using a Vietnamese man for target practice, Henry said.
They had discovered the victim sleeping in a hut and decided to kill him for sport.
"Everybody was taking pot shots at him, seeing how accurate they were," Henry said in his statement.
Back at base camp on Oct. 23, he said, members of the 1st Platoon told him they had ambushed five unarmed women and reported them as enemies killed in action. Later, members of another platoon told him they had seen the bodies.
Copyright 2006 Los Angeles Times
www.CommonDreams.org
December 2, 2005 by Mike Ferner
Melvin Laird, Vietnam and Christmas Bombings Over Baghdad?
— Beware Iraqization
"But we can't walk away from the conflict now," he cautioned.
"We will be able to start withdrawal of our forces as the Iraqi forces come into readinessJust because we get our force level down in Iraq doesn't mean we can walk away  (All together now:)  or the losses we suffered will be in vain."
When the reporter introduced the term "Vietnamization," Laird interrupted her to say eagerly, "That's a good term. I coined that term.   And it worked very well, I think."
With images of U.S. helicopters evacuating people from the roof of the U.S. Embassy in Saigon coming to mind, I heard the reporter counter that perhaps in the end it didn't work.
Gentleman Mel interrupted again to say, "Vietnamization did work.   I mean the forces of the South Vietnamese were doing very well but they had to have U.S. support to carry on the war"
Finally, answering a question concerning whether Bush could count on sufficient popular support to make "Iraqization" work, Laird allowed as how "I think we need to have more straight talk in order to show real leadership in this field."
Kewe note: 2 million Vietnamese people were killed before the U.S. did not: 'have U.S. support to carry on the war.'
And the chamber was empty because the Senators were somewhere else:
they were in fundraisers collecting money from special interests
in order to buy 30-second TV commercials for their next re-election campaign.
Al Gore - Former Vice President
www.CommonDreams.org
December 2, 2005 by Mike Ferner
Melvin Laird, Vietnam and Christmas Bombings Over Baghdad?
— Beware Iraqization
This is news worth the pain of listening to a fall pledge drive?
One would think that having to hear that 800 number in our sleep would at least have earned us the right to learn some basics of this Vietnamization business:
That in order to quell a growing antiwar sentiment spilling into the streets, Nixon decided to change the color of the corpses in Viet Nam by replacing U.S. ground troops with U.S. bombers.
That in just six months of 1972, U.S. warplanes dropped 702,000 500-pound bombs on Viet Namor.
That 15 giant B-52's would be shot down during the "Christmas Bombings" that year.
With nearly 100 crewmembers killed or captured.
And saints preserve us from hearing how this history relates directly to Iraq today.
You'll recall how nearly every Member of Congress ­Republican and Democrat alike ­was struck down apoplectic when Representative Murtha suggested the U.S. withdraw from Iraq?
Former Guantanamo Chaplain James Yee
Juan Gonzalez:  ...You mentioned the monitors in the back.   And that was because you had this special prison block for prisoners who were mentally disturbed, who had been seriously affected by the conditions that they were living in.
Chaplain James Yee:   They had to be monitored 24 hours a day, because they were under suicide threat.
It was that serious.
It was so serious that the Joint Task Force needed to have a team of 17 psychiatric nurses and doctors to take care of these prisoners who got to that state.
And this resulted [mass suicide attempts] when I was there predominantly from their complaints that the Koran was being abused, or that Islam was being insulted, disrespected.
Other general complaints that they had, for the most part, I was able to try and handle them and try and relieve some of those tensions.
So, the protests, the resistance was the abuse of the Koran.
They could put up with being mistreated to some extent.
They can put up with being humiliated.
But what they wouldn't put up with is Islam or the Koran being mistreated, and that led to them taking drastic measures, conducting the — willing to conduct or take their own life and try and hang themselves.
Now, contrast that with today.
There's a growing hunger strike going on now in Guantanamo.
And we see that in the news where not just two detainees are being force-fed, but it's been reported that some 18 or 21 detainees are now being force-fed.
And we have seen in the news, the recent news reports, the reasons for this protest, it's not just now abuses against religion, it's the general abuses that I was able to handle and help them deal with when I was there.
There's no Muslim chaplain there today, as far as I know.
So this, to me, is an indication that the conditions down in Guantanamo seemingly have deteriorated to even worse conditions than when I was there almost two years ago.”
www.CommonDreams.org
December 2, 2005 by Mike Ferner
We are the OCCUPIERS
Consider what Murtha outlined: a force of Marines "over the horizon" ready at a minute's notice and bombers awaiting presidential orders.
This is a script to make Bush's Iraqization look disturbingly like Nixon's Vietnamization ­ and with similar results for the people of Iraq.
The color of the casualties will change and that's about all.
We are the OCCUPIERS in Iraq.
The OCCUPIERS have created institutions ­ an army, police, and paramilitary death squads among them ­that are permanently tainted by our connection to them.
When our troops eventually leave, no number of "Marines over the horizon," or punishing air strikes, or "battle-ready battalions" of Iraqis will keep the OCCUPIER'S institutions in place.
Resistance, some of it undoubtedly violent, will continue until those institutions are either removed or destroyed.
That's a bit of a public service 'information' public radio could actually provide.
And leave Mel Laird to peddle his memoirs elsewhere.
 
And what did you hear, my blue-eyed son?
And what did you hear, my darling young one?
I heard the sound of a thunder, it roared out a warnin',
Heard the roar of a wave that could drown the whole world,
Heard one hundred drummers whose hands were a-blazin',
Heard ten thousand whisperin' and nobody listenin',
Heard one person starve, I heard many people laughin',
Heard the song of a poet who died in the gutter,
Heard the sound of a clown who cried in the alley,
And it's a hard, and it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard,
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.
Bob Dylan - Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall

Civilian Killings Went Unpunished
Declassified papers show U.S. atrocities went far beyond My Lai.
By Nick Turse and Deborah Nelson, Special to The Times
August 6, 2006
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq

Combat Medic Platoon Sgt. Vietnam 1970.

American soldiers got 'Had' in Vietnam by their government.
 
I did not serve in Vietnam for the cause of freedom, I served Big Business in America for the cause of war profiteering. 

Words and photo by Mike Hastie.

Vietnam Veteran.

Image has no connection to the LA Times story.
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.
Combat Medic Platoon Sgt.
Vietnam 1970
American soldiers got 'Had' in Vietnam by their government.
I did not serve in Vietnam for the cause of freedom, I served Big Business in America for the cause of war profiteering.
Words and photo by Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
Images inserted by TheWE.cc
Image has no connection to the LA Times story
Tet Offensive
Capt. Donald C. Reh, a 1964 graduate of West Point, took command of B Company in November 1967. Two months later, enemy forces launched a major offensive during Tet, the Vietnamese lunar New Year.
In the midst of the fighting, on Feb. 7, the commander of the 1st Battalion, Lt. Col. William W. Taylor Jr., ordered an assault on snipers hidden in a line of trees in a rural area of Quang Nam province.   Five U.S. soldiers were killed.   The troops complained bitterly about the order and the deaths, Henry said.
The next morning, the men packed up their gear and continued their sweep of the countryside.   Soldiers discovered an unarmed man hiding in a hole and suspected that he had supported the enemy the previous day.   A soldier pushed the man in front of an armored personnel carrier, Henry said in his statement.
"They drove over him forward which didn't kill him because he was squirming around, so the APC backed over him again," Henry's statement said.
Then B Company entered a hamlet to question residents and search for weapons.   That's where Henry set down his weapon and lighted a cigarette in the shelter of a hut.
A radio operator sat down next to him, and Henry was listening to the chatter.   He heard the leader of the 3rd Platoon ask Reh for instructions on what to do with 19 civilians.
"The lieutenant asked the captain what should be done with them.   The captain asked the lieutenant if he remembered the op order (operation order) that came down that morning and he repeated the order which was 'kill anything that moves,' " Henry said in his statement.   "I was a little shook … because I thought the lieutenant might do it."
Henry said he left the hut and walked toward Reh.   He saw the captain pick up the phone again, and thought he might rescind the order.
Then soldiers pulled a naked woman of about 19 from a dwelling and brought her to where the other civilians were huddled, Henry said.
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq

'Top Secret — The Very Top'

You do not bring the enemy to the peace table by just killing military combatants.

You ultimately bring the enemy to the peace table by killing innocent civilians.

They are military targets.

The primary goal of the aggressor nation is to break the spirit of the people, and its ability to defend its homeland. 

This strategy is as old as warfare itself.
 
Words and image by Mike Hastie

Vietnam Veteran
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.
'Top Secret — The Very Top'
You do not bring the enemy to the peace table by just killing military combatants.
You ultimately bring the enemy to the peace table by killing innocent civilians.
They are military targets.
The primary goal of the aggressor nation is to break the spirit of the people, and its ability to defend its homeland.
Words and image by Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
"She was thrown to the ground," he said in his statement.   "The men around the civilians opened fire and all on automatic or at least it seemed all on automatic.   It was over in a few seconds.   There was a lot of blood and flesh and stuff flying around….
"I looked around at some of my friends and they all just had blank looks on their faces….   The captain made an announcement to all the company, I forget exactly what it was, but it didn't concern the people who had just been killed.   We picked up our stuff and moved on."
Henry didn't forget, however.   "Thirty seconds after the shooting stopped," he said, "I knew that I was going to do something about it."
Homecoming
For his combat service, Henry earned a Bronze Star with a V for valor, and a Combat Medical Badge, among other awards.
A fellow member of his unit said in a sworn statement that Henry regularly disregarded his own safety to save soldiers' lives, and showed "compassion and decency" toward enemy prisoners.
When Henry finished his tour and arrived at Ft. Hood, Texas, in September 1968, he went to see an Army legal officer to report the atrocities he'd witnessed.
The officer advised him to keep quiet until he got out of the Army, "because of the million and one charges you can be brought up on for blinking your eye," Henry says.   Still, the legal officer sent him to see a Criminal Investigation Division agent.
The agent was not receptive, Henry recalls.
"He wanted to know what I was trying to pull, what I was trying to put over on people, and so I was just quiet. I told him I wouldn't tell him anything and I wouldn't say anything until I got out of the Army, and I left," Henry says.
Copyright 2006 Los Angeles Times
February 17 - 21, 2006
Atrocities attributed to "rogue" Shiite and Sunni militias — trained by Americans, "advised" by Americans, run largely by former CIA assets
By Chris Floyd
Friday, December 2, 2005. Issue 3308. Page 112.
The recent revelations about the virulent spread of death squads ravaging Iraq have only confirmed for many people the lethal incompetence of the Bush Regime, whose brutal bungling appears to have unleashed the demon of sectarian strife in the conquered land.
The general reaction, even among some war supporters, has been bitter derision: "Jeez, these bozos couldn't boil an egg without causing collateral damage."
But what if the truth is even more sinister?   What if this murderous chaos is not the fruit of rank incompetence but instead the desired product of carefully crafted, efficiently managed White House policy?
Investigative journalist Max Fuller marshals a convincing case for this conclusion in a remarkable work of synthesis based on information buried in reams of mainstream news stories and public Pentagon documents.
Car bomb attack
Samara, Iraq
Unknown if US black budget special operations money involved
Piling fact on damning fact, he shows that the vast majority of atrocities attributed to "rogue" Shiite and Sunni militias are in fact the work of government-controlled commandos and "special forces," trained by Americans, "advised" by Americans and run largely by former CIA assets, Global Research reports.
Saddam's security muscle
We first reported here in August 2003 that the United States was already hiring Saddam's security muscle for "special ops" against the nascent insurgency and reopening his torture haven, Abu Ghraib.
Meanwhile, powerful Shiite militias — including religious extremists armed and trained by Iran — were loosed upon the land.
As direct "Coalition" rule gave way to various "interim" and "elected" Iraqi governments, these violent gangs were formally incorporated into the Iraqi Interior Ministry, where the supposedly inimical Sunni and Shiite units often share officers and divvy up territories.
Bush helpfully supplied these savage gangs
Bush helpfully supplied these savage gangs — who are killing dozens of people each week, Knight-Ridder reports — with U.S. advisers who made their "counter-insurgency" bones forming right-wing death squads in Colombia and El Salvador.
Indeed, Bush insiders have openly bragged of "riding with the bad boys" and exercising the "Salvador option," lauding the Reagan-backed counter-insurgency program that slaughtered tens of thousands of civilians, Newsweek reports.
Bush has also provided a "state-of-the-art command, control and communications center" to coordinate the operation of his Iraqi "commandos," as the Pentagon's own news site, DefendAmerica, reports.
The Iraqi people can go without electricity, fuel and medicine, but by God, Bush's "bad boys" will roll in clover as they carry out their murders and mutilations.
Packing high-priced Glocks
For months, stories from the Shiite south and Sunni center have reported the same phenomenon: people being summarily seized by large groups of armed men wearing police commando uniforms, packing high-priced Glocks, using sophisticated radios and driving Toyota Land Cruisers with police markings.
The captives are taken off and never seen again — unless they turn up with a load of other corpses days or weeks later, bearing marks of the gruesome tortures they suffered before the ritual shot in the head.
Needless to say, these mass murders under police aegis are rarely investigated by the police.
Milking Iraq dry — into hands of a few Bush cronies,
The Bushists may have been forced to ditch their idiotic fantasies of "cakewalking" into a compliant satrapy, but they have by no means abandoned their chief goals in the war: milking Iraq dry and planting a permanent military "footprint" on the nation's neck.
If direct control through a plausible puppet is no longer possible, then fomenting bloody chaos and sectarian strife is the best way to weaken the state.
The Bushists are happy to make common cause with thugs and zealots in order to prevent the establishment of a strong national government that might balk at the ongoing "privatizations" that have continued apace behind the smokescreen of violence, or at the planned opening of Iraq's oil reserves to select foreign investors — a potential transfer of some $200 billion of Iraqi people's wealth into the hands of a few Bush cronies, The Independent reports.
The violence is already dividing the county into more rigid sectarian enclaves, The New York Times reports, as Shiites flee Sunni commandos and Sunnis flee Shiite militias in the grim tag team of their joint endeavor.
Terrorized, internally driven society much easier to manipulate
It's all grist for the Bushist mill: An atomized, terrorized, internally driven society is much easier to manipulate.
Car bomb attack
Samara, Iraq
Unknown if US black budget special operations money involved
And of course, a steady stream of bloodshed provides a justification for maintaining a U.S. military presence, even as politic plans for partial "withdrawal" are bandied about.
There's nothing new in this; Bush is simply following a well-thumbed playbook.
In 1953, the CIA bankrolled Islamic fundamentalists and secular goon squads to destabilize the democratic government of Iran — which selfishly wanted to control its own oil — and pave the way for the puppet Shah, as the agency's own histories recount.
In 1971, CIA officials admitted carrying out more than 21,000 "extra-judicial killings" in its Phoenix counter-insurgency operation in Vietnam.
In 1979, the CIA began sponsoring the most violent Islamic extremist groups in Afghanistan — supplying money, arms, even jihad primers for schoolchildren — to destabilize the secular, Soviet-allied government and provoke the Kremlin into a costly intervention, as Robert Dreyfus details in his new book, "Devil's Game."
Later, Saudi magnate Osama bin Laden joined the operation, and sent his men to the United States for "anti-Soviet" terrorist training, as the BBC's Greg Palast reports.
Remarkably consistent for more than half a century
The policy has been remarkably consistent for more than half a century.
To augment the wealth and power of the elite, U.S. leaders have supported — or created — vicious gangs of killers and cranks to foment unrest, eliminate opponents and terrorize whole nations into submission.
The resulting carnage in the target countries and the inevitable blowback against ordinary Americans mean nothing to these Great Gamesters; that's simply the price of doing business.
Bush's "incompetence" is just a mask for stone-cold calculation.
Annotations
Crying Wolf: Media Disinformation and Death Squads in Occupied Iraq
Global Research, Nov. 10, 2005
Explosion
Baghdad, Iraq
Unknown if US black budget special operations money involved
Frontline Police of Iraq are Waging Secret War of Vengeance
The Observer, Nov. 20, 2005
Devil's Game: How the United States Helped Unleash Fundamentalist Islam
Metropolitan Books, 2005
Killings Linked to Shiite Squads in Iraqi Police Force
Los Angeles Times, Nov. 29, 2005
The Salvador Option
Newsweek, Jan. 14, 2005
Die Laughing: The Bush Way of Rehabilitation
Empire Burlesque, Aug. 29, 2003
Iraqi Guards Seen as Death Squads
Newsday, Nov. 15, 2005
Sunnis Accuse Iraqi Military of Kidnappings and Slayings
New York Times, Nov. 28, 2005
Sunni men in Baghdad targeted by attackers in police uniforms
Knight-Ridder, June 27. 2005
Abuse of Prisoners in Iraq Widespread, Officials Say
Knight-Ridder, Nov. 29, 2005
Robert Dreyfus on Bush's Deadly Dance With Islamic Theocrats
TomDispatch, Nov. 30, 2005
A History of Violence: Robert Dreyfuss Interview
Salon.com, Nov. 28, 2005
Documents From the Phoenix Program
The Memory Hole, May 2003
Secrets of History: The CIA in Iran
New York Times, April 16, 2000
The Hidden History of CIA Torture
TomDispatch.com, Sept. 9, 2004
The World's Most Dangerous Man
Antiwar.com, Nov. 30, 2005
Abuse Worse Than Under Saddam, Says Iraqi Leader
The Observer, Nov. 27, 2005
Revealed: The Grim New World of Iraqi Torture Camps
The Observer, July 3, 2005
Lost Amid the Rising Tide of Detainees in Iraq
New York Times, Nov. 21, 2005
Did the President spike the investigation of bin Laden?
Greg Palast, Nth Position, March 2003
If the CIA Had Butted Out [In Iran]
Los Angeles Times, Oct. 21, 2001
Up in the Air: Where Is the Iraq War Headed Next?
The New Yorker, Nov. 5, 2005
Private Security Crews Add to Fear in Baghdad
The Washington Post, Nov. 28, 2005
al-Tanaf checkpoint
Woman waits at Syrian, Iraq border
UK Funds Aid Iraqi Torture Units
The Observer, July 3, 2005
The CIA and Operation Phoenix in Vietnam
Ralph McGehee, Feb. 19, 1996
U.S. Senate Review of Operation Phoenix
United States Senate, Feb. 17 to March 19, 1970
Counter-Revolutionary Violence: Bloodbaths in Fact & Propaganda
Noam Chomsky and Edward S. Herman
Project X, Drugs and Death Squads
Consortium News, 1997
Phoenix Project: It's How We Fought the War
Los Angeles Times, May 3, 2001
The Phoenix Program Revisited
CounterPunch, May 15, 2004
The Gentlemanly Planners of Assassinations
Slate.com, Nov. 1, 2002
© Copyright 2005, The Moscow Times.   All Rights Reserved.
We have to stop giving our leaders free passes to kill our children, anywhere and everywhere
Cindy Sheehan
Oh, who did you meet, my blue-eyed son?
Who did you meet, my darling young one?
I met a young child beside a dead pony,
I met a white man who walked a black dog,
I met a young woman whose body was burning,
I met a young girl, she gave me a rainbow,
I met one man who was wounded in love,
I met another man who was wounded with hatred,
And it's a hard, and it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard,
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.
Bob Dylan - Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall

Civilian Killings Went Unpunished
Declassified papers show U.S. atrocities went far beyond My Lai.
By Nick Turse and Deborah Nelson, Special to The Times
August 6, 2006
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq

Combat Medic.

Vietnam 1970.

American soldiers got 'Had' in Vietnam by their government.
 
I did not serve in Vietnam for the cause of freedom, I served Big Business in America for the cause of war profiteering. 

Words and photo by Mike Hastie.

Vietnam Veteran.

Image has no connection to the LA Times story.
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.
Combat Medic.
Vietnam 1970
American soldiers got 'Had' in Vietnam by their government.
I did not serve in Vietnam for the cause of freedom, I served Big Business in America for the cause of war profiteering.
Words and photo by Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
Images inserted by TheWE.cc
Image has no connection to the LA Times story
Honorably discharged in March 1969, Henry moved to Canoga Park, enrolled in community college and helped organize a campus chapter of Vietnam Veterans Against the War.
Then he ended his silence: He published his account of the massacre in the debut issue of Scanlan's Monthly, a short-lived muckraking magazine, which hit the newsstands on Feb. 27, 1970.
Henry held a news conference the same day at the Los Angeles Press Club.
Records show that an Army operative attended incognito, took notes and reported back to the Pentagon.
A faded copy of Henry's brief statement, retrieved from the Army's files, begins:
"On February 8, 1968, nineteen (19) women and children were murdered in Viet-Nam by members of 3rd Platoon, 'B' Company, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry….
"Incidents similar to those I have described occur on a daily basis and differ one from the other only in terms of numbers killed," he told reporters.
A brief article about his remarks appeared inside the Los Angeles Times the next day.
Army investigators interviewed Henry the day after the news conference.   His sworn statement filled 10 single-spaced typed pages.
Henry did not expect anything to come of it: "I never got the impression they were ever doing anything."
In 1971, Henry joined more than 100 other veterans at the Winter Soldier Investigation, a forum on war crimes sponsored by Vietnam Veterans Against the War.
The FBI put the three-day gathering at a Detroit hotel under surveillance, records show, and Nixon administration officials worked behind the scenes to discredit the speakers as impostors and fabricators.
Although the administration never publicly identified any fakers, one of the organization's leaders admitted exaggerating his rank and role during the war, and a cloud descended on the entire gathering.
"We tried to get as much publicity as we could, and it just never went anywhere," Henry says.   "Nothing ever happened."
After years of dwelling on the war, he says, he "finally put it in a closet and shut the door."
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.

The war crime of occupation

Young vietnamese girl

'Top Secret — The Very Top'

You do not bring the enemy to the peace table by just killing military combatants.

You ultimately bring the enemy to the peace table by killing innocent civilians.

They are military targets.

The primary goal of the aggressor nation is to break the spirit of the people, and its ability to defend its homeland. 

This strategy is as old as warfare itself.
 
Words and photo by Mike Hastie

Vietnam Veteran
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.
The war crime of occupation
'Top Secret — The Very Top'
You do not bring the enemy to the peace table by just killing military combatants.
You ultimately bring the enemy to the peace table by killing innocent civilians.
They are military targets.
The primary goal of the aggressor nation is to break the spirit of the people, and its ability to defend its homeland.
Words and photo by Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
The Investigation
Unknown to Henry, Army investigators pursued his allegations, tracking down members of his old unit over the next 3 1/2 years.
Witnesses described the killing of the young boy, the old man tossed over the cliff, the man used for target practice, the five unarmed women, the man thrown beneath the armored personnel carrier and other atrocities.
Their statements also provided vivid corroboration of the Feb. 8, 1968, massacre from men who had observed the day's events from various vantage points.
Staff Sgt. Wilson Bullock told an investigator at Ft. Carson, Colo., that his platoon had captured 19 "women, children, babies and two or three very old men" during the Tet offensive.
"All of these people were lined up and killed," he said in a sworn statement.
"When it, the shooting, stopped, I began to return to the site when I observed a naked Vietnamese female run from the house to the huddle of people, saw that her baby had been shot.
"She picked the baby up and was then shot and the baby shot again."
Gregory Newman, another veteran of B Company, told an investigator at Ft. Myer, Va., that Capt. Reh had issued an order "to search and destroy and kill anything in the village that moved"
Newman said he was carrying out orders to kill the villagers' livestock when he saw a naked girl head toward a group of civilians.
"I saw them begging before they were shot," he recalled in a sworn statement.
Copyright 2006 Los Angeles Times
          

Author David Dionisi says the US faces a nuclear threat
American Hiroshima — the next 9/11?
Sunday 27 November 2005
By Shaheen Chughtai in London
When Australian police announced recently that eight men arrested on terrorism charges were planning a bomb attack against a nuclear reactor near Sydney, many security observers elsewhere were not surprised.
Officials and analysts in the United States have been warning that al-Qaida or associated groups are planning such attacks on American soil.
Dubbed American Hiroshima, the plan apparently targets New York, Miami, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Chicago, San Francisco, Las Vegas, Boston and Washington, DC.
Former US Defence Secretary William Perry says there is an even chance of a nuclear attack on the US this decade.   Renowned investor Warren Buffet has predicted "a nuclear terrorist attack ... is inevitable".
David Dionisi, a former US army intelligence officer, is convinced that plans for a nuclear attack are under way.
Once a conservative Republican, Dionisi enjoyed success as a Fortune 500 business executive after leaving the army.   But he later rejected his political beliefs and now advocates peace, social justice and humanitarianism.
In his new book, American Hiroshima, Dionisi argues decades of unjust US foreign policies will be largely to blame for sowing the seeds of hostility and vengeance which could lead to a nuclear catastrophe.
Aljazeera's Shaheen Chughtai caught up with Dionisi in London.
Dionisi had just flown from Liberia where he helps run a Catholic orphanage.
Aljazeera.net: You were once a conservative Republican.   What made you change your beliefs?
Dionisi: The transformation was a discovery process.   When I joined the military, I had a very limited view of what the US was doing around the world.   Through my experiences as a military intelligence officer and later as a business executive doing international volunteer work, I started to see our foreign policies were often hurting people and making the world more dangerous.
One of the more dramatic moments in this process was when I was assigned to a unit focusing on implementing US foreign policy in central America.   I was part of a rapid deployment team designed to go in and suppress forces working for social justice in places such as Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala.
You describe the US public as uninformed — why?
The major media outlets are owned by a handful of corporations interested in promoting advertising and pro-government messages.   Anything that challenges the existing power structure very often fails to receive air time.   I highlight Fox as an extreme example of the Republican propaganda machine.
But when your country is fighting a war, you have an obligation to understand what's really going on.   If you don't, you can become an agent of injustice.   If people can find the time to watch baseball or soccer etc, they can make an effort to read, travel, talk and not be limited to the messages of fear.
They also need to understand their history.   In 1962, the Joint Chiefs of Staff presented a plan called Operation Northwood, which is now declassified.   It proposed conducting mass casualty attacks on American targets and blaming it on Cuba to rally public support for war against Fidel Castro.   President Kennedy rejected the plan.   So we shouldn't just assume any future attack on our soil is the work of al-Qaida.
Your book condemns alliances with repressive regimes.   Can't these be justified if they serve a greater cause?
History teaches us that when you form alliances that promote injustice, you can only expect injustice in the future.   Kindness begets kindness and the inverse is also true.
The US fought the largest secret war in its history during the 1980s in Afghanistan — over $6bn was funnelled into that war.   As a result, US collaboration with and responsibility for al-Qaida goes well beyond what most even informed Americans understand.
If you consider that there are over 500 prisoners in Guantanamo Bay from over 40 countries — though not a single one is from Iraq — and that the CIA recruited thousands of people from over 40 countries to be part of that war — none from Iraq — you can better understand how the US played a direct role in creating what became the Taliban and al-Qaida.
Bush supporters argue the removal of Saddam and the Taliban was beneficial and therefore justified military action.
That starts from an artificial premise.   When the Bush administration says, "Well, it's great that Saddam's gone," it fails to acknowledge that Bush's father and President Ronald Reagan were key forces that helped create Saddam Hussein.
Looking at what happened in 1979 it can put a lot of this in perspective.   As Reagan came into office, the US embassy hostages in Iran were released after 444 days in captivity.   Americans don't know this wasn't a coincidence.   The US had agreed in writing not to attack Iran and also paid Tehran $8bn.   That's why that media event (of the hostages' release during Reagan's inauguration ceremony) occurred with such precise timing.
How do you know this?
These are facts that were subsequently published.   The agreement with Iran was submitted for review by the current administration to see if it would be binding and prevent an attack in the near future.
Bush administration attorneys concluded it was signed under duress and therefore not binding.   I know this from a former senior member of the Bush administration, a seasoned CIA officer named Ray Flynn.
The US felt humiliated; the Reagan administration wanted to hurt the Iranians but its hands were tied.   So Saddam Hussein was used as the agent for that.   He ended up invading Iran ... and you had this brutal war from 1980 to 1988 that killed over a million people.
What was the US role in that war?
By 1982, Iran had recaptured lost territory and Saddam asked the US for help.   So President Reagan signed a National Security Decision Directive — NSDD 114 — to provide all means of support to Saddam Hussein.   Donald Rumsfeld then went on a very sensitive mission to deliver satellite intelligence, other forms of intelligence and weapons of mass destruction (WMD).
That's why the current Bush administration was so confident Saddam had chemical and biological weapons; they knew the US had supplied the ingredients in the 1980s.
Saddam broke with the US, however, when he found out we were selling weapons to Iran in the mid-1980s — the Iran-Contra affair.   All this puts the invasion of Kuwait into perspective.   Saddam got clear messages from the US saying he could invade; plus he felt the US owed him one after betraying him over Iran.
All these wars form a continuum of injustice.   Look at the UN economic sanctions in the 1990s that the US and UK refused to lift: over a million Iraqis died, including 500,000 children.   That's more than the number who died from the Nagasaki and Hiroshima atomic bombings.
You list numerous "unjust" actions that led to attacks on US targets — isn't that justifying terrorism?
I talked to the CIA's Michael Scheuer, head of the "find Bin Ladin" team, and he stresses that people in the Muslim world are not fighting us because of our freedoms or elections but our foreign policy.   This is something the Bush administration constantly twists.
The basic principle is: if you hurt someone, they're going to want to hurt you.   We need to ask questions like: Why did 9/11 happen?   Bin Ladin has a very clear articulation of why he's at war with the US, Britain, Israel and others.   If Americans read it, they'll see it's very clear about things such as US forces on Arab land.
And it's not just an Arab or Muslim issue.   I learnt this in South Korea where the US has had troops since 1950.   When you're there that long, it sends a powerful message that you're not there to liberate, you're there to occupy.
You describe the US as the biggest WMD proliferator.   Why?
The US has spent $5 trillion on 70,000 nuclear weapons since 1945 — more than the rest of the world combined.   A Congressional report in 1999 found the designs for every deployed nuclear warhead — and for some not built yet — had been stolen and passed to China.   Israel acquired its programme from the US too.
Despite this, ordinary Americans are more concerned about the Bush administration's lies and hyped-up warnings about WMD in places such as Iraq.
Is Iran really a threat to the US?   An alliance between Shia Iran and Sunni-led al-Qaida seems far fetched.
Iran will not attack the US if the US does not attack Iran.   Congressman Curt Weldon (who accuses Tehran of plotting to attack the States) talks about attacking Iran but such talk makes the world more dangerous.   If we were Iran, we'd develop nuclear weapons simply because Israel has them.   So the US should facilitate a process whereby Israel eliminates its nuclear weapons.
As for the religious differences between Iran and al-Qaida, yes, that's been true — but Bush's War on Terror has been pushing the sects together.   Intelligence reports indicate Bin Ladin's son Saad has been based in Iran.   No, we can't be certain they're helping each other.   But in any case, the Bush administration does not want peace with Iran.
You say "kindness begets kindness".   What's your evidence?
After the first world war, the Treaty of Versailles punished Germany harshly, producing hardship and hostility that the Nazis exploited.   But after the second world war, when the Marshall Plan helped rebuild Germany and Japan, the US did more to promote democracy than at any time during the Cold war.
To make the world a safer place, we must aggressively attack the causes of suffering and hostility.   Imagine if Bush had said after 9/11: "People are capitalising on our mistakes in the Middle East.   So, let's ensure there is no hunger, lack of clean water, lack of education etc in the Muslim world."   We would have made more friends and drained support for our enemies.
If we can't expect US foreign policy to change soon, isn't it too late to stop an American Hiroshima?
It's not too late although your point is realistic.   But we can still influence the US response.   Far more people will die in the retaliation and the counter-retaliation.
If the US had the wisdom, we could make the world safer.   The US military budget was over $420 billion in 2005.   We could split that three ways: a third on economic development in the Middle East, especially Iraq; a third on tackling injustice at home, such as providing universal healthcare — and that would still leave us with the world's biggest military budget.
People have to become more involved.   The anti-Vietnam war movement is an example — but it failed to hold government to account.   If we had tried (former Defence Secretary) Robert McNamara or (former Secretary of State) Henry Kissinger for crimes such as the illegal bombing of Cambodia, it would have sent a powerful message to future leaders.   The Bush government today wouldn't have been so bold.
Ultimately, Americans need to understand many of them will die and parts of their country will become uninhabitable unless they hold their government to account.
          Aljazeera
All the war-propaganda, all the screaming and lies and hatred, comes invariably from people who are not fighting
George Orwell
Oh, what'll you do now, my blue-eyed son?
Oh, what'll you do now, my darling young one?
I'm a-goin' back out 'fore the rain starts a-fallin',
I'll walk to the depths of the deepest black forest,
Where the people are many and their hands are all empty,
Where the pellets of poison are flooding their waters,
Where the home in the valley meets the damp dirty prison,
Where the executioner's face is always well hidden,
Where hunger is ugly, where souls are forgotten,
Where black is the color, where none is the number,
And I'll tell it and think it and speak it and breathe it,
And reflect it from the mountain so all souls can see it,
Then I'll stand on the ocean until I start sinkin',
But I'll know my song well before I start singin',
And it's a hard, and it's a hard, it's a hard, it's a hard,
And it's a hard rain's a-gonna fall.
Bob Dylan - Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall

Civilian Killings Went Unpunished
Declassified papers show U.S. atrocities went far beyond My Lai.
By Nick Turse and Deborah Nelson, Special to The Times
August 6, 2006
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.

The war crime of occupation

Grief.

Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. 1986.

'Top Secret — The Very Top'

You do not bring the enemy to the peace table by just killing military combatants.

You ultimately bring the enemy to the peace table by killing innocent civilians.

They are military targets.

The primary goal of the aggressor nation is to break the spirit of the people, and its ability to defend its homeland. 

This strategy is as old as warfare itself.
 
Words and photo by Mike Hastie

Vietnam Veteran
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.
Grief.
Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. 1986.
'Top Secret — The Very Top'
You do not bring the enemy to the peace table by just killing military combatants.
You ultimately bring the enemy to the peace table by killing innocent civilians.
They are military targets.
The primary goal of the aggressor nation is to break the spirit of the people, and its ability to defend its homeland.
Words and photo by Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
Donald R. Richardson said he was at a command post outside the hamlet when he heard a platoon leader on the radio ask what to do with 19 civilians.
"The cpt said something about kill anything that moves and the lt on the other end said 'Their [sic] moving,' " according to Richardson's sworn account. "Just then the gunfire was heard."
William J. Nieset, a rifle squad leader, told investigators that he was standing next to a radio operator and heard Reh say: "My instructions from higher are to kill everything that moves."
Robert D. Miller said he was the radio operator for Lt. Johnny Mack Carter, commander of the 3rd Platoon. Miller said that when Carter asked Reh what to do with the 19 civilians, the captain instructed him to follow the "operation order."
Carter immediately sought two volunteers to shoot the civilians, Miller said under oath.
"I believe everyone knew what was going to happen," he said, "so no one volunteered except one guy known only to me as 'Crazy.' "
"A few minutes later, while the Vietnamese were huddled around in a circle Lt Carter and 'Crazy' started shooting them with their M-16's on automatic," Miller's statement says.
Carter had just left active duty when an investigator questioned him under oath in Palmetto, Fla., in March 1970.
"I do not recall any civilians being picked up and categorically stated that I did not order the killing of any civilians, nor do I know of any being killed," his statement said.
An Army investigator called Reh at Ft. Myer. Reh's attorney called back.   The investigator made notes of their conversation: "If the interview of Reh concerns atrocities in Vietnam … then he had already advised Reh not to make any statement."
As for Lt. Col. Taylor, two soldiers described his actions that day.
Myran Ambeau, a rifleman, said he was standing five feet from the captain and heard him contact the battalion commander, who was in a helicopter overhead.   (Ambeau did not identify Reh or Taylor by name.)
"The battalion commander told the captain, 'If they move, shoot them,' " according to a sworn statement that Ambeau gave an investigator in Little Rock, Ark.   "The captain verified that he had heard the command, he then transmitted the instruction to Lt Carter.
"Approximately three minutes later, there was automatic weapons fire from the direction where the prisoners were being held."
Gary A. Bennett, one of Reh's radio operators, offered a somewhat different account.   He said the captain asked what he should do with the detainees, and the battalion commander replied that it was a "search and destroy mission," according to an investigator's summary of an interview with Bennett.
Bennett said he did not believe the order authorized killing civilians and that, although he heard shooting, he knew nothing about a massacre, the summary says.   Bennett refused to provide a sworn statement.
An Army investigator sat down with Taylor at the Army War College in Carlisle, Pa.   Taylor said he had never issued an order to kill civilians and had heard nothing about a massacre on the date in question.   But the investigator had asked Taylor about events occurring on Feb. 9, 1968 — a day after the incident.
Three and a half years later, an agent tracked Taylor down at Ft. Myer and asked him about Feb. 8. Taylor said he had no memory of the day and did not have time to provide a sworn statement.   He said he had a "pressing engagement" with "an unidentified general officer," the agent wrote.
Copyright 2006 Los Angeles Times
Aaron Broussard, president of Jefferson Parish in Louisiana, appearing on NBC’s Meet the Press.
And she drowned Friday night
The guy who runs this building I'm in, emergency management, he's responsible for everything.
His mother was trapped in St. Bernard nursing home and every day she called him and said, "Are you coming, son?    Is somebody coming?"
And he said, "Yeah, Mama, somebody's coming to get you.   Somebody's coming to get you on Tuesday.   Somebody's coming to get you on Wednesday.   Somebody's coming to get you on Thursday.   Somebody's coming to get you on Friday."
And she drowned Friday night.
She drowned Friday night.
Died in Iraq
November, 2005
A member of a U.S. Army Honor Guard helps ceremonially fold a flag above the coffin containing the body of U.S. soldier Antonio Mendez, who died recently in Iraq, at his funeral in Rincon, western Puerto Rico, Friday, Dec. 2, 2005.

Antonio Mendez, age 22, was killed in Kirkuk, Iraq, on Nov. 11
 
Image: AP/Brennan Linsley

A member of a U.S. Army Honor Guard helps ceremonially fold a flag above the coffin containing the body of U.S. soldier Antonio Mendez, who died recently in Iraq, at his funeral in Rincon, western Puerto Rico, Friday, Dec. 2, 2005.
Antonio Mendez, age 22, was killed in Kirkuk, Iraq, on Nov. 11
Photo: AP/Brennan Linsley
December 6, 2005
The Posse Gathers
Bush War Crimes
By Jeremy Brecher and Brendan Smith
Diverse forces are assembling to bring Bush administration officials to account for war crimes.   Cindy Sheehan, Gold Star Mother for Peace, insists: "We cannot have these people pardoned.   They need to be tried on war crimes and go to jail." 1
Paul Craig Roberts, Hoover Institution senior fellow and assistant secretary of the treasury under Ronald Reagan, charges Bush with "lies and an illegal war of aggression, with outing CIA agents, with war crimes against Iraqi civilians, with the horrors of the Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo torture centers" and calls for the president's impeachment. 2
Anne-Marie Slaughter, dean of the Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton and former president of the American Society of International Law, declares: "These policies make a mockery of our claim to stand for the rule of law.   [Americans] should be marching on Washington to reject inhumane techniques carried out in our name." 3
Can such disparate forces as the peace movement, conservative advocates of the rule of law, and human rights advocates join to halt high government officials demonstrably engaged in criminal enterprise?
Can they reach out and appeal to the deep but vacillating commitment of the American people to the national and international rule of law?
Or will the Bush administration divide the posse and retain for itself the mantle of defender of international law and the U.S. Constitution?
War Crimes: It's Not Just Torture
As Allied armies advanced into Germany, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill declared captured Nazi leaders outlaws subject to summary execution.
But U.S. President Harry Truman, a former small-town judge, insisted instead on formal trials with "notification to the accused of the charge, the right to be heard, and to call witnesses in his defense."
The result was the Nuremberg War Crimes Tribunal and the start of a revolution that, in U.S. Justice Robert Jackson's words, replaced a "system of international lawlessness" with one that made "statesmen responsible to law."
It is this revolution that may be catching up with the administration of George W. Bush.
Vietnam war crimes
During the Cold War era, Nuremberg was little more than a dimming memory.
Charges by Richard Falk, Marcus Raskin, and others that U.S. actions in Vietnam constituted war crimes helped swell opposition to the war, but U.S. officials were never held to account for their actions.
Starting in the 1990s, however, the revolutionary principle that government officials must be responsible to law became an integral part of the human rights and democratization movements that swept much of the world.
Milosevic was driven out of office and turned over to an international war crimes tribunal.   Pinochet was captured in Spain and eventually sent back to Chile to face charges as a torturer.   The International Criminal Court was established to try war crimes.
Henry Kissinger wrote in alarm in 2001 that "in less than a decade an unprecedented movement has emerged to submit international politics to judicial procedures" and has "spread with extraordinary speed." 4
International law
Critical to this unprecedented movement has been an evolved relationship between national and international law.   In the past, international law was seen as a potential infringement on national sovereignty.
(The Bush administration is trying to resuscitate that view-for example, in its attacks on the International Criminal Court.)
But today the two are increasingly intertwined and mutually reinforcing, much like state and national law in the United States.
Many new democracies see institutions like the International Criminal Court as bulwarks against the restoration of tyranny in their own countries — much as the U.S. Constitution guarantees that its member states will be republics, not monarchies.
Toward this end, many countries have incorporated aspects of international law into their national statutes — the U.S. War Crimes Act, for example, makes grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions a crime under U.S. law, punishable in some cases by death.
Supreme international crime
Several overlapping strands have coalesced into a body of law regarding war crimes.
One is the prohibition on aggressive war.   As the Nuremberg Tribunal put it, "To initiate a war of aggression" is " the supreme international crime."
A second strand is humanitarian law, which protects both combatants and civilians from unnecessary harm during war.
The devastation associated with World War II led to the recognition of "crimes against humanity," which involve acts of violence against a persecuted group.
War crimes were codified in the four Geneva Conventions of 1949 and have been further developed in subsequent protocols and agreements.
The Nuremberg Tribunal was criticized on the grounds that it represented not impartial justice but "victor's justice," that it provided impunity for the bombing of civilians and other heinous acts committed by the victors, and that it prosecuted people "ex post facto" for acts that had not been declared crimes when they were committed.
These charges had considerable justification.
But today there is a body of national and international law that clearly defines war crimes and a set of procedures for applying them comparable to the procedures used to judge other crimes.
Those are the standards by which allegations of American war crimes must be judged.
Law must — and the international law of war crimes now does — provide a single standard of judgment that can be applied without discrimination to different cases.
If an act is a war crime, then it is a war crime whether it is perpetrated by Saddam Hussein or by George Bush.
American War Crimes in Iraq and Beyond
The charge that the U.S. attack on Iraq was a war crime was raised even before the war began.
No evidence Blackwater convoy came under fire directly or indirectly
Not hit even by a stone — spokesman Ali al-Dabbagh
Blackwater guards killed 17 people
23 people wounded in 16 September shooting
More than 1,000 law professors and U.S. legal institutions organized in opposition to the U.S. war crime of launching an "aggressive war in violation of the UN Charter" against Iraq.
Violation of international law was also a central theme in worldwide demonstrations against the war.
The attack on the illegality of the war has been revived by the leak of the Downing Street memo; 130 members of Congress joined Rep. John Conyers in demanding that the Bush administration come clean about the invasion — supported by a half million citizen signatures gathered in barely a week.
"Scootergate" is fundamentally about the cover-up of White House lies justifying the war.
Torture
Illegal detention and torture are also war crimes.
Starting with the exposure of prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo, cascading revelations have established that these cases exemplify a pattern of abuse authorized at the highest levels of government.
Human rights groups like the Center for Constitutional Rights, the American Civil Liberties Union, and Human Rights First sued in U.S. and foreign courts against Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld and others for breaching the U.S. Constitution and the Geneva Conventions.
The Senate's 90-9 vote to restore the military's traditional prohibition against torture and inhumane treatment of prisoners — prompting the Bush administration to threaten a veto — sets the stage for a major confrontation over adherence to both the Geneva Conventions and the U.S. Constitution.
Crimes against peace and crimes against humanity
Despite massive cover-ups, the evidence is emerging: the Bush administration planned an illegal war of aggression against Iraq, conned the American people and their representatives into supporting it, conducted an illegal occupation marked by massive violation of Iraqi human rights, and justified and promoted systematic torture.
Now the White House seeks opportunities for further criminal attacks against Iran, Syria, and other countries around the world, issuing threats to use death squads and nuclear weapons at will.
These acts violate American law, international law, and the basic values of the American people.
They are crimes against peace and crimes against humanity.
They are outlawed by the Geneva Conventions, the UN Charter, and treaties against torture and other human rights abuses.
Lake Tharthar
U.S. attack helicopters
Six women and nine children included in killing on October 13, 2007
They are war crimes, and those who ordered and condoned them are war criminals.
War Crimes and the Rule of Law
The Nuremberg principle that statesmen are "responsible to law" extended to international relations the principle of "government under law" already enshrined in the U.S. Constitution.
Indeed, no principle of American democracy is more fundamental or more widely accepted than the precept that no one is above the law.
But a central endeavor of the Bush administration has been to put the government, and more particularly the president, above both U.S. and international law.
So extreme
This was made clear in President Bush's refusal to apply the Geneva Conventions to prisoners of war captured during the Afghanistan War.
Soon after, the United States refused to adhere to UN Charter requirements regulating the use of force.
Then the Justice Department argued that courts would not have jurisdiction over Guantanamo detainees even if they were being summarily executed.
The Ninth Circuit Court commented, "the U.S. government has never before asserted such a grave and startling proposition," a position "so extreme that it raises the gravest concerns under both American and international law." 5
As Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman put it, the claim that the president is above the law "strikes at the very heart of our democracy.
Genuine conservatives
It was the centerpiece of President Richard Nixon's defense in Watergate — a defense that was rejected by the courts and lay at the foundation of the articles of impeachment voted against him by the House Judiciary Committee."
It is ironic that such a doctrine should emerge from a movement that calls itself "conservatism" and purports to have limitation of government as its fundamental principle.
Indeed, it is more than ironic; it is totally hypocritical.
Government crime
And this claim of unlimited presidential powers has turned many genuine conservatives — ranging from former government and military officials to the many corporate lawyers defending Guantanamo inmates — against the Bush administration.
Law entails more than an individual or social preference; it obligates individuals and institutions to act.
Describing his evolving viewpoint, Daniel Ellsberg wrote that he saw the U.S. involvement in Vietnam "first as a problem; then as a stalemate; then as a crime."
Each of these perspectives called for "a different mode of personal commitment: a problem, to help solve it; a stalemate, to extricate ourselves with grace; a crime, to expose and resist it, to try to stop it immediately, to seek moral and political change." 6
A focus on government-sponsored crime has the potential to open a discourse with those across the political spectrum — from civil rights advocates to military attorneys — who believe that government must not be exempt from the rule of law.
US troops opened fire on unarmed car
Wounding 3 people two in critical condition
It draws on a democratic, constitutionalist tradition and the powerful popular conviction that law and law enforcement are necessary and that they must apply to all, including the government and its highest officials.
Toward Convergence
Bush administration malfeasance can be described as a problem of democracy, of human rights, of usurpation, of the rule of law, of constitutionalism, or of war crimes.
These terms all point to the same fundamental problem: those in charge of the political and military apparatus of the U.S. government are using it to further a criminal enterprise in violation of national and international law.
Resistance to government criminality
Each step of this criminal behavior has been contested by different constituencies and on somewhat differing grounds.
If those constituencies could unite around a common frame, they could halt the entire Bush enterprise.
The role of the Bush administration in promoting war crimes in Iraq and beyond can provide that unifying frame.
Resistance to such government criminality can unify diverse constituencies who believe in rule of law.
Accusations of American war crimes have long been a staple of left-wing groups like ANSWER and the International Action Center.
But many mainstream peace activists have been wary.
As one well-known leader put it earlier this year:
"War-crimes talk pushes people away.   People don't want to hear it.   Polls indicate that the population says under some circumstances torture is OK, and that what's being done is not torture.
People blame bad apples.
They want to prosecute the bad apples so they can have a cleaner war.
Besides, they say, we're dealing with horrible people who cut off people's heads.
What is our end goal?
If our objective is to stop the occupation, then war crimes is not the best angle."
These are legitimate concerns.
Right and obligation of all people to hold their governments accountable
However, they imply not that the issue of war crimes shouldn't be raised but rather that it should be raised wisely with due respect for the feelings of the American people.
War crimes accusations should not be presented as anti-American but rather as an appeal to the American people to share the right and obligation of all people to hold their governments accountable.
By rejecting the Bush administration's attempt to blame torture and other abuses on "bad apples" at the bottom, accountability can be placed squarely on those at the top.
The crimes of U.S. opponents can be acknowledged without justifying those perpetrated in Washington.
Illegal detention, prisoner abuse, and torture can be presented as part of a larger pattern of war crimes.
As Justice Jackson noted at Nuremberg, a war of aggression differs from other war crimes only in that "it contains within itself the accumulated evil of the whole."
Girl killed by US puppet — quisling soldiers
Shot and killed in village near Baquba
If the peace movement can connect with the American public's belief in the rule of law, the days of George Bush's criminal enterprise will be numbered.
Moral and religious conviction
The war crimes frame also provides the peace movement a way to reach out to Americans on the basis of moral and religious convictions.
Religious opponents of the war, such as the ecumenical Fellowship of Reconciliation and the Catholic 'St. Patrick's Four,' have frequently stressed international law as a basis for their actions.
The faith-based group Reclaiming the Prophetic Voice calls it a way to reach out to "the people in the pews."
Clean war?
Some sectors of the human rights movement have been outspoken opponents of the Iraq War from before its start.
The Center for Constitutional Rights, for example, organized lawyers nationwide to declare it illegal under national and international law.
But other human rights advocates have tried to separate torture and prisoner abuse as a "human rights issue" from the broader questions of war and occupation, leading some to portray their objective as "a clean war."
Human rights advocates need to recognize that the use and legitimation of torture by the Bush administration is just an extreme manifestation of a broader illegal enterprise.
Fallujah — Tal Afar
Both the peace and the human rights movements need to pay more attention to current and planned future war crimes.
Last year's attacks on Fallujah were condemned as war crimes around the world, but there was not much response in the United States.
The withholding of food and water to civilian populations in recent attacks on Tal Afar are clear violations of international law that would have provided a clear opportunity to raise the question of war crimes as they occurred. 7
Plans to turn targeting of U.S. air strikes over to the Iraqi military, recently revealed by Seymour Hersh in the New Yorker, could be challenged as likely to greatly increase civilian casualties. 8
Nucler war crime
U.S. plans to use nuclear weapons against Iran, openly discussed by Vice President Cheney, surely constitute a war crime.
These ongoing daily events provide a target both for action and for public education.
The Bush administration's crimes of aggression, occupation, and torture are all part of one sordid story.
Father mourns for daughter
Shot and killed by quisling soldiers
That story can best be told when these actions are called by their proper name — war crimes.
Checks and Balances
There are four obvious objectives for a movement against U.S. war crimes:
Halt the crimes. This requires withdrawing U.S. forces from Iraq, closing the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, releasing or immediately putting on trial all captives, and shutting down U.S.-controlled death squads all over the world.
Bring war criminals to justice. Impunity breeds crime.
The mechanisms for investigation, prosecution, and trial of criminals must be applied to anyone — from the president on down — who is responsible for war crimes.
Every agency charged with investigating governmental crimes must end its paralysis and perform its duties.
Those responsibilities should include congressional committee hearings on war crimes, a Sept. 11-style investigative commission, appointment of a special prosecutor, and an in-depth congressional investigation into whether impeachable offences have been committed.
Draw the lessons. Unchecked presidential authority and flouting of international law led the United States to a national catastrophe in Vietnam, but the obvious lessons were deliberately obscured or denied.
We are paying the price today.
Only an extensive and extended public confrontation with the implications of U.S. war crimes can lay the basis for averting similar catastrophes in the future.
Establish barriers to future war crimes. The Bush administration's war crimes were made possible by the dismantling of legal and constitutional barriers to government secrecy, deceit, manipulation, and lawlessness.
Their perpetuation has been enhanced by the dismantling of legal restrictions on presidential authority and the seduction or intimidation of those whose duty it is to enforce such restrictions.
The U.S. democratic heritage and recent experiences of many countries in eliminating dictatorships point to specific institutional arrangements — from independent prosecutors to battlefield legal supervision and from freedom-of-information laws to international courts empowered to hear war crimes charges — that can be effective in preventing war crimes in the future.
New chapter
A national repudiation of war crimes and an end to impunity for those who order them could open a new chapter in America's relations with the rest of the world.
Mother cries for daughter
Shot and killed in village near Baquba by quisling soldiers
It might help the United States re-engage with Iraq and the rest of the Middle East on an entirely new basis — one cleansed of the legacy of Fallujah and Abu Ghraib.
It would evidence America's good faith if Washington utilized international law to address such genuine problems as terrorism and weapons of mass destruction.
Ending impunity for those responsible for U.S. war crimes would help restore the role of international law in constraining self-aggrandizement by any nation.
Out-of-control criminal government
After being convicted for pouring his own blood on a Lansing, NY military recruitment center, war protestor Peter DeMott declared the real crime to be that:
"Our government conspired against the American people and lied us into an illegal and immoral war.
The task is now upon us all to better understand the criminality of our government's aggression and, as citizens, to act accordingly to demand that our government adheres to international law." 9
As Cindy Sheehan put it to more than 100,000 war protesters assembled in Washington, DC, "We'll be the checks and balances on this out-of-control criminal government." 10
End Notes
1. Mike Ferner, "What One Mom Has to Say to George Bush," August 9, 2005, available at .
2. Paul Craig Roberts, "Impeach Bush Now," available at , September 3, 2005.
3. Quoted in Robert Kuttner, "Will Bush Wriggle Out of This One?" Boston Globe, September 10, 2005.
4. Henry Kissinger, "The Pitfalls of Universal Jurisdiction: Risking Judicial Tyranny," Foreign Affairs, July-August 2001.
5. See Gherebi v. Bush, Ninth Circuit, December 18, 2003.
6. Quoted in Norman Solomon, "Cindy Sheehan's Message Repudiates George Bush — and Howard Dean," Common Dreams, August 13, 2005.
7. The UN's Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food recently described the withholding of food and water by U.S. forces in Iraq as "a clear violation of international law." Eulalia Iglesias, "UN Food Expert Condemns U.S. Tactics in Iraq," Inter Press Service, 11/30/05.
8. Seymour M. Hersh, "Up in the Air: Where Is the Iraq War Headed Next?" New Yorker, December 5, 2005.
Brother cries for loss of sister
Shot and killed in village near Baquba by quisling soldiers
9. Press release, September 26, 2005.
10. "Thousands in Wash Protest War, Econ Globalization," Reuters, September 24, 2005.
Jeremy Brecher and Brendan Smith, with Jill Cutler, are the co-editors of In the Name of Democracy: American War Crimes in Iraq and Beyond (New York: Metropolitan/Holt, 2005) and co-founders of War Crimes Watch.

Civilian Killings Went Unpunished
Declassified papers show U.S. atrocities went far beyond My Lai.
By Nick Turse and Deborah Nelson, Special to The Times
August 6, 2006
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.

The war crime of occupation

Uncle Sam and His Endless Bodybags.

58,000 US killed in Vietnam, 300,000 wounded

1.5 million, 2 million, 3 million Vietnamese people killed in Vietnam.

How many wounded?

2,675+ killed in Iraq, 20,000+ wounded

How many Iraqi people in Iraq killed?

How many injured.

And then there is Afghanistan, getting worse

and worse and worse.

Endless wars???

'Top Secret — The Very Top'

You do not bring the enemy to the peace table by just killing military combatants.

You ultimately bring the enemy to the peace table by killing innocent civilians.

They are military targets.

The primary goal of the aggressor nation is to break the spirit of the people, and its ability to defend its homeland. 

This strategy is as old as warfare itself.
 
Words and image by Mike Hastie

Vietnam Veteran
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.
Uncle Sam and His Endless Bodybags.
58,000 US killed in Vietnam, 300,000 wounded
1.5 million, 2 million, 3 million Vietnamese people killed in Vietnam.
How many wounded?
2,675+ US soldiers killed in Iraq, 20,000+ wounded
How many Iraqi people in Iraq killed?
How many injured.
And then there is Afghanistan, getting worse
and worse and worse.
Endless wars???
Words and image by Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
Investigators wrote they could not find Pvt. Frank Bonilla, the man known as "Crazy." The Times reached him at his home on Oahu in March.
Bonilla, now 58 and a hotel worker, says he recalls an order to kill the civilians, but says he does not remember who issued it.   "Somebody had a radio, handed it to someone, maybe a lieutenant, said the man don't want to see nobody standing," he said.
Bonilla says he answered a call for volunteers but never pulled the trigger.
"I couldn't do it.   There were women and kids," he says.   "A lot of guys thought that I had something to do with it because they saw me going up there….   Nope … I just turned the other way.   It was like, 'This ain't happening.' "
Afterward, he says, "I remember sitting down with my head between my knees.   Is that for real?   Someone said, 'Keep your mouth shut or you're not going home.' "
He says he does not know who did the shooting.
The Outcome
The Criminal Investigation Division assigned Warrant Officer Jonathan P. Coulson in Los Angeles to complete the investigation and write a final report on the "Henry Allegation."   He sent his findings to headquarters in Washington in January 1974.
Evidence showed that the massacre did occur, the report said.   The investigation also confirmed all but one of the other killings that Henry had described.   The one exception was the elderly man thrown off a cliff.   Coulson said it could not be determined whether the victim was alive when soldiers tossed him.
The evidence supported murder charges in five incidents against nine "subjects," including Carter and Bonilla, Coulson wrote.   Those two carried out the Feb. 8 massacre, along with "other unidentified members of their element," the report said.
Investigators determined that there was not enough evidence to charge Reh with murder, because of conflicting accounts "as to the actual language" he used.
But Reh could be charged with dereliction of duty for failing to investigate the killings, the report said.
Coulson conferred with an Army legal advisor, Capt. Robert S. Briney, about whether the evidence supported charges against Taylor.
They decided it did not.   Even if Taylor gave an order to kill the Vietnamese if they moved, the two concluded, "it does not constitute an order to kill the prisoners in the manner in which they were executed."
The War Crimes Working Group records give no indication that action was taken against any of the men named in the report.
Briney, now an attorney in Phoenix, says he has forgotten details of the case but recalls a reluctance within the Army to pursue such charges.
"They thought the war, if not over, was pretty much over.   Why bring this stuff up again?" he says.
Years Later
Taylor retired in 1977 with the rank of colonel.   In a recent interview outside his home in northern Virginia, he said, "I would not have given an order to kill civilians.   It's not in my makeup.   I've been in enough wars to know that it's not the right thing to do."
Reh, who left active duty in 1978 and now lives in Northern California, declined to be interviewed by The Times.
Copyright 2006 Los Angeles Times
December 1, 2005    www.counterpunch.org    Ron Jacobs
Towards a Greater Air War on Iraq? — Hard Rain
Recently, news reports in US and European newspapers have suggested that Washington and London are considering a major reduction in their forces in Iraq.
These reports usually fail to mention that those same forces were increased only last summer and that the rumored reduction is really not as large as advertised when looking at the actual numbers in country.
Also, with few exceptions, most of these reports don't bother to state that if the troops are pulled back from the front and brought home, the Pentagon plans to replace their combat capability with air power.
For those who were around during the US war in Vietnam, this plan is an eery echo of the last few years of that war.
Back then, this strategy was part of the Nixon administration's plan for "peace with honor."
It was a plan known as Vietnamization and worked like this:
South Vietnamese troops (ARVN) worked with diminished US forces on the ground, attacking guerrilla forces and their supporters after calling in air strikes conducted by US Air Force (USAF) planes.
In addition, there would be occasional bombing campaigns that targeted entire areas of the Vietnamese countryside and lasted for days or even weeks, destroying whole villages and parts of cities and killing civilians by the hundreds.
Perhaps the best known of these massive bombing campaigns took place during the month of December in 1972 and were known as the Christmas bombings.
This storm of death was the biggest campaign of its kind and destroyed portions of Hanoi and many other northern Vietnamese cities.
More than 1600 Vietnamese died in that eleven day period.
December 1, 2005    www.counterpunch.org    Ron Jacobs
Towards a Greater Air War on Iraq? — Hard Rain
At this point, it seems that the US is using its air power in Iraq (and Afghanistan) for what they call close-support operations.
Usually this means that the air attacks are on a relatively small scale and that bombs and rockets are targeted at individual buildings and city blocks.
Still, the number of air support missions is not small.
In fact, according to a November 28, 2005 press release from the U.S. Central Command Air Forces, "Coalition aircraft flew 46 close-air support missions Nov. 27 for Operation Iraqi Freedom.
"They (the missions) supported coalition troops, infrastructure protection, reconstruction activities, and operations to deter and disrupt terrorist activities.
"Coalition aircraft also supported Iraqi and coalition ground forces operations to create a secure environment for upcoming December parliamentary elections."
These 46 missions were followed by 42 more on November 28th.
That's 88 acknowledged air support missions in two days.
(In addition, 18 more close support missions were reported in Afghanistan for the 28th of November.)
Multiply that by seven days in a week and it becomes 308 flight combat missions in Iraq alone.
Given the nature of the weaponry, even so-called close air support means that there will be civilian deaths.
It's pretty much impossible to kill only one or two people with a quarter-ton bomb or even a 50 pound rocket.
The collateral effects of the use of such rockets by Israel on cars motored by Palestinian resistance members proves this point quite graphically.
The old film of Vietnamese farmers raked by gunfire from US attack copters and rockets from low-flying US jets underline the likelihood of increased civilan dead, as well.
 
Published on Saturday, December 24, 2005 by the Inter Press Service
Emblem of Apartheid Resurfaces in Iraq
by John Lasker
COLUMBUS — Black South Africans gave them a slang term, recalls Les Switzer, naming them the "Saracens".
And when they were called in to break up a protest, he also remembers the terror they brought.
"The mere presence of a Saracen struck fear in the people," said Switzer, a long-time journalism professor at the University of Houston in the U.S. state of Texas.   "(They) were like an evil presence wandering through the township."
Over a span of 30 years, Switzer was a U.S. expatriate, working as a journalist and teacher during South Africa's apartheid regime.
Implemented by the white-dominated Afrikaner government, the apartheid policy strove for segregation and domination over blacks, who constituted 70 percent of the population.
After writing stints with some of South Africa's underground papers, Switzer took a teaching position at Rhodes University in Grahamstown.   Following the funeral of an anti-apartheid martyr in 1980, he says the Eastern Cape township had a short fuse, and an uprising would soon engulf it.
"The South African government, not trusting the local police, had sent in armed troops and Saracens to monitor the proceedings, and the result was a foregone conclusion," he said.
The Saracens, says Switzer, author of "South Africa's Alternative Press: Voices of Protest and Resistance, 1880s-1960s", are the huge and unmistakable armoured trucks the South African government used to quell uprisings.   Their official name was the "Buffel", which is Afrikaans for Buffalo.
When he recently heard the U.S. military was implementing a heavily-armoured truck very familiar to the Saracen, he wasn't surprised.
At this moment, the Pentagon is rushing these U.S.-made trucks into battle.   There are two types.   One is called the "Buffalo", which is mostly used for bomb clearance.   Then there's the "Cougar", which is smaller yet more versatile.
Switzer says their size "is unforgettable".   Both tower over the flat, low-to-ground Humvees.   Their narrow, V-shaped hulls direct blasts detonated underneath vehicles out and away from passengers.
Same engineers that designed the original Buffel for the South African military
The company that manufactures them — Force Protection Inc. of Charleston, SC — admits the V-shaped design is indeed taken from past South African designs.   They also say some of the same engineers that designed the original Buffel for the South African military are now employed by Force Protection.
"At the end of Apartheid (in the early '90s), many of South Africa's best engineers and scholars, and scientists left the county," said Switzer.   (Emphasis of best added by TheWE.cc to bring attention to the use of the word as an attribution of a commonly held notion.   Best is what sense?)
Others in the U.S. are also scrutinising the military's decision to adopt such a controversial symbol of oppression.
Stationed in Africa during the 1980s, a U.S. Special Forces veteran from the Midwest does not say when or how he first became familiar with the heavily armoured trucks.   But he is well aware of the emotions they evoke.
Fire into their countrymen
"To the ANC (African National Congress, and its supporters), the Buffalo is a hated symbol.   It is like how Jews view the swastika.   South African blacks despise them," he told IPS.   He refused to give his name because he now runs a high-level state government office.
During uprisings, he says, the vehicles would be driven directly into rioting crowds.   Armed soldiers would then pop out of a top hatch and fire into their countrymen, he says.   ANC supporters returned fire with rocks that clanged harmlessly off the thick armour.
While their legacy seems set in stone, perhaps the vehicles can redeem themselves.   By all accounts that is what the U.S. military is betting on.
Since Secretary of Defence Donald Rumsfeld told one concerned U.S. soldier, "You have to go to war with the Army you have, not the Army you want," Force Protection has won several Pentagon contracts totaling well over a hundred million dollars.
An estimated 75 Buffalos and Cougars now roam both theatres in Iraq and Afghanistan.   More are on the way.   So far their records are perfect, claims Force Protection.   Not a single coalition soldier has died in a Buffalo or Cougar when struck with an improvised explosive.
"The response from the field has been overwhelmingly positive," said Jeff Child, a spokesman for Force Protection.   He adds that the vehicles uncovered roughly 200 improvised explosives in and around central Iraq last winter alone.
"Two of my men in Ramadi survived an IED (improvised explosive device) attack while in the Cougar," said Lt. Cameron Chen, part of a U.S. military ordinance removal team.   "So I am a believer.   All agree that it's the safest vehicle."
Can trucks defeat the Iraq resistance fighters
The rising popularity of the Buffalo and Cougar raises a significant question.   Can two trucks turn the tide in Iraq?
One military analyst believes the Buffalo and Cougar won't single-handedly defeat the Iraqi insurgency in the near term.
"You have to keep in mind there are 10,000 vehicles in Iraq that are subject to ambush," said John Pike, director of GlobalSecurity.org, which focuses on worldwide military news.   "I wouldn't count on the (Buffalo and Cougar) having an immediate impact because the military doesn't have the sufficient numbers to make a difference."
Even if the U.S. military could deliver to Iraq large numbers of both vehicles, it may not matter how thick their armour is, he says.   The insurgency will fabricate improvised explosives large enough to obliterate whatever the U.S. military throws into the fray.
"Several hundred pounds of explosives will level a small office building," said Pike.   "A thousand-pound bomb is like a hot knife through butter.   IEDs of this size have blown away Abrams [tanks].   Keep in mind there's no shortage of ammo in Iraq."
Jets — shooting at people?
Yet because of their prowess at destroying buried bombs in Iraqi soil — for instance, the Buffalo can be fitted with a robotic arm — these battleships on wheels could be the answer to one of the globe's biggest problems: the forgotten landmine.
Force Protection bristled at the South African connection.   In a letter responding to questions by IPS, the company wrote that any "attempt to tie the technology" to the apartheid regime of South Africa "is as outrageous as attempting to tie Boeing commercial aircraft to the German invention of the jet engine during WWII".
© 2005 IPS - Inter Press Service

Civilian Killings Went Unpunished
Declassified papers show U.S. atrocities went far beyond My Lai.
By Nick Turse and Deborah Nelson, Special to The Times
August 6, 2006
Jamie Henry, now a logger in California, was among members of Vietnam Veterans Against the War whom the government worked to discredit.   But military investigators substantiated his accounts of war crimes.
Jamie Henry, now a logger in California, was among members of Vietnam Veterans Against the War whom the government worked to discredit.   But military investigators substantiated his accounts of war crimes.
Carter, a retired postal worker living in Florida, says he has no memory of his combat experiences.   "I guess I've wiped Vietnam and all that out of my mind.   I don't remember shooting anyone or ordering anyone to shoot," he says.
He says he does not dispute that a massacre took place.   "I don't doubt it, but I don't remember….   Sometimes people just snap.
Henry was re-interviewed by an Army investigator in 1972, and was never contacted again.   He drifted away from the antiwar movement, moved north and became a logger in California's Sierra Nevada foothills.   He says he had no idea he had been vindicated — until The Times contacted him in 2005.
Last fall, he read the case file over a pot of coffee at his dining room table in a comfortably worn house, where he lives with his wife, Patty.
"I was a wreck for a couple days," Henry, now 59, wrote later in an e-mail.   "It was like a time warp that put me right back in the middle of that mess.   Some things long forgotten came back to life.   Some of them were good and some were not.
"Now that whole stinking war is back.
"After you left, I just sat in my chair and shook for a couple hours.
"A slight emotional stress fracture??
"Don't know, but it soon passed and I decided to just keep going with this business.
"If it was right then, then it still is."
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.

The war crime of occupation

Medevac Helicopter Vietnam 1970

58,000 US killed in Vietnam, 300,000 wounded

1.5 million, 2 million, 3 million Vietnamese people killed in Vietnam.

How many wounded?

2,675+ killed in Iraq, 20,000+ wounded

How many Iraqi people in Iraq killed?

How many injured.

And then there is Afghanistan, getting worse

and worse and worse.

Endless wars???

I

Remember

Another

Quagmire

IRAQ

'Top Secret — The Very Top'

You do not bring the enemy to the peace table by just killing military combatants.

You ultimately bring the enemy to the peace table by killing innocent civilians.

They are military targets.

The primary goal of the aggressor nation is to break the spirit of the people, and its ability to defend its homeland. 

This strategy is as old as warfare itself.
 
Words and image by Mike Hastie

Vietnam Veteran
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.
Medevac Helicopter Vietnam 1970
I
R emember
A nother
Q uagmire
Words and image by Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
Times researcher Janet Lundblad contributed to this report.
About this report
Nick Turse is a freelance journalist living in New Jersey.   Deborah Nelson is a staff writer in The Times' Washington bureau.
This report is based in part on records of the Vietnam War Crimes Working Group filed at the National Archives in College Park, Md.   The collection includes 241 case summaries that chronicle more than 300 substantiated atrocities by U.S. forces and 500 unconfirmed allegations.
The archive includes reports of war crimes by the 101st Airborne Division's Tiger Force that the Army listed as unconfirmed.   The Toledo Blade documented the atrocities in a 2003 newspaper series.
Turse came across the collection in 2002 while researching his doctoral dissertation for the Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health at Columbia University.
Turse and Nelson also reviewed Army inspector general records in the National Archives; FBI and Army Criminal Investigation Division records; documents shared by military veterans; and case files and related records in the Col. Henry Tufts Archive at the University of Michigan.
A selection of documents used in preparing this report can be found at latimes.com/vietnam.
Copyright 2006 Los Angeles Times
December 1, 2005    www.counterpunch.org    Ron Jacobs
Towards a Greater Air War on Iraq? — Hard Rain
So, why then are the Pentagon and White House considering this change in strategy?
Plain and simple, it's about US domestic politics.
Back in 1969, when Nixon was elected to his first term, he promised to bring peace with honor and end the war in Vietnam.
Instead, he expanded the war and it became even bloodier.
At the same time, however, he did begin to remove US troops from ground battle.
Since the ARVN was not trusted by US commanders to carry out the war on its own, the Pentagon used the remaining several thousand US ground forces to lead search-and-destroy missions with the assistance of USAF weaponry and the ARVN.
Although this strategy made the war planners in Washington look good to the war-weary US public while it continued the killing of Vietnamese, it did not sit so well with the Saigon government.
They knew it would not keep them in power.
Like Robert H. Johnson, a member of the Policy Planning Council in the US State Department from 1962-67, wrote in the establishment journal Foreign Affairs in 1970:
"It is evident from (South Vietnamese) President Thieu's cautious views as to the appropriate timing of U.S. withdrawals, as well as from the continuing flow of news reports on the views of American officers in South Vietnam, that many in Vietnam — aware of the persistent, long-standing weaknesses of the ARVN's military efforts —(were) rather less sanguine than U.S. policy-makers about the prospects for a reasonably early U.S. pullout." (July 1970)
Despite this, there was still some talk from the warmakers' circles in July 1970 that the US could achieve its goals in Vietnam through military action from the air, even as it was removing its ground troops from Cambodia after the violent and widespread opposition to the April 30, 1970 invasion of that country.
To illustrate this, even though US troops were for the most part removed from Cambodia, the bombing of that country continued unabated until the US-installed government fell to the Khmer Rouge in spring 1975.
December 1, 2005    www.counterpunch.org    Ron Jacobs
Towards a Greater Air War on Iraq? — Hard Rain
According to a Seymour Hersh piece in the New Yorker on November 28, 2005, some USAF commanders are concerned about switching to the greater use of air power in Iraq.
The two primary reasons they mention are the increased danger of civilian casualties and the possibility of Iraqi commanders calling in the strikes.
The former concern, while noble, is increasingly pointless, given the nature of the war on the ground, where the occupying forces tend to shoot first and determine the nature of their victims later.
Unsaid in these officers' concern is the historical fact that air power doesn't work against a guerrilla insurgency.
If it did, then wouldn't Ho Chi Minh City still be named Saigon?
Would the FARC guerrilla forces in Colombia still control a substantial portion of the Colombian countryside?
It seems that air power does not win wars — it only destroys the earth and makes a lot of money for the weapons industry.
That, and increases the hatred of the population that the aircraft and their pilots are bombing.
Perhaps if an aggressor is willing to carry such a policy to its logical conclusion — total devastation — than that aggressor can probably win its war, albeit there will be little left to win (except for that oil in the case of Iraq).
Is this what George Bush means when he insists on nothing short of victory?
If not, than it seems that the only reason for a strategy that replaces ground combat with death from the air is some kind of chauvinistic revenge.
ESTIMATED NUCLEAR WARHEADS, STRATEGIC AND TACTICAL
Map showing declared, suspected and potential nuclear nations.

The US is also said to have some 3,000 warheads in reserve, while Russia has about 11,000 in non-operational stockpiles.

Israel declines to confirm it has nuclear weapons.

North Korea — 1 test underground, October 2006.

Iran is accused by the US of ambitions to build nuclear arms.

The United states had drawn up a battle plan for the potential use of nuclear weapons in Iraq and the United States has been involved in planning potential nuclear use scenarios for Iran.

The United States is now involved in a massive program to overhaul its nuclear arsenal.

In fact they're working to replace every nuclear warhead and all of the existing delivery systems in the arsenal to ensure prompt precision global strike capabilities.

Jackie Cabasso — Western States Legal Foundation
The United States has conducted 1,127 nuclear and thermonuclear tests — 217 in the atmosphere.
The Soviet Union/ Russia conducted 969 tests — 219 in the atmosphere.
France, 210 tests, 50 in the atmosphere.
The United Kingdom, 45 tests — 21 in the atmosphere.
China, 45 tests — 23 in the atmosphere.
India and Pakistan — 13 tests underground.
Israel — possible 1 test atmosphere South Africa 1979.
North Korea — 1 test underground, October 2006.
“The United states had drawn up a battle plan for the potential use of nuclear weapons in Iraq and the United States has been involved in planning potential nuclear use scenarios for Iran.”
“The United States is now involved in a massive program to overhaul its nuclear arsenal.   In fact they're working to replace every nuclear warhead and all of the existing delivery systems in the arsenal to ensure prompt precision global strike capabilities.”
Jackie Cabasso — Western States Legal Foundation
Western Elite militarism
Western Elite Terror States
Western Elite War Crimes
Danish scientist Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 on nano-thermite in the WTC dust.

911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

2,606 people lost their lives in the World Trade Center buildings on September 11, 2001.

125 people lost their lives at the Pentagon on 9/11.

246 people lost their lives on the four planes on 9/11.

Image: Danish TV2
Danish scientist Niels Harrit on nano-thermite in the WTC dust.

Niels Harrit, you and eight other researchers conclude in this article that it was nano-thermite that caused these buildings to collapse.

We have discovered distinctive red/gray chips in all the samples we have studied of the dust produced by the destruction of the World Trade Center.

One sample was collected by a Manhattan resident about ten minutes after the collapse of the second WTC Tower, two the next day, and a fourth about a week later.

The properties of these chips were analyzed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).

The red portion of these chips is found to be an unreacted thermitic material and highly energetic.

The carbon content of the red material indicates that an organic substance is present.

This would be expected for super-thermite formulations in order to produce high gas pressures upon ignition and thus make them explosive.

Photo: agenda911.dk
Danish scientist Niels Harrit on nano-thermite in the WTC dust
Transcript of interview with Niels Harrit on Danish TV2 News 6th April 2009.
Active Thermitic Material Discovered in Dust from the 9/11 World Trade Center Catastrophe
Danish TV2   International researchers have found traces of explosives among the World Trade Center rubble.
911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 television.

Explosives in World Trade Center - international researchers have found traces of explosives.

Image: Danish TV2
911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 television.

Researchers found nano-thermite explosives in the dust and rubble of the World Trade Center buildings.

Image: Danish TV2
911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 television.

Researchers found nano-thermite explosives in the dust and rubble of the World Trade Center buildings that cannot have come from the planes.

Image: Danish TV2
911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 television.

Researchers found nano-thermite explosives in the dust and rubble of the World Trade Center buildings that cannot have come from the planes.

The believe several tonnes of explosives were placed in the buildings in advance.

Image: Danish TV2
911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 television.

Nano-thermite contains more energy than dynamite and can be used as rocket fuel.

Researchers found nano-thermite explosives in the dust and rubble of the World Trade Center buildings that cannot have come from the planes.

The believe several tonnes of explosives were placed in the buildings in advance.

Image: Danish TV2
911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 television.

So you found nano-thermite in the World Trade Center buildings, why do you think it caused the collapses?

Researchers found nano-thermite explosives in the dust and rubble of the World Trade Center buildings that cannot have come from the planes.

The believe several tonnes of explosives were placed in the buildings in advance.

Image: Danish TV2
A new scientific article concludes that impacts from the two hijacked aircraft did not cause the collapses in 2001.
We turn our attention to 9/11 — the major attack in New York.
Apparently the two airplane-impacts did not cause the towers to collapse, according to a newly published scientific article.
Researchers found nano-thermite explosive in the rubble, that cannot have come from the planes.
They believe several tonnes of explosives were placed in the buildings in advance.
Niels Harrit, you and eight other researchers conclude in this article, that it was nano-thermite that caused these buildings to collapse. What is nano-thermite?
Niels Harrit   We found nano-thermite in the rubble.
We are not saying only nano-thermite was used.
Thermite itself dates back to 1893.
It is a mixture of aluminum and rust-powder, which react to create intense heat.
The reaction produces iron, heated to 2500 °C.
This can be used to do welding.   It can also be used to melt other iron.
Nanotechnology makes things smaller.   So in nano-thermite, this powder from 1893 is reduced to tiny particles, perfectly mixed.
When these react, the intense heat develops much more quickly.
Nano-thermite can be mixed with additives to give off intense heat, or serve as a very effective explosive.
It contains more energy than dynamite, and can be used as rocket fuel.
Danish TV2   I Googled nano-thermite, and not much has been written about it.   Is it a widely known scientific substance?   Or is it so new that other scientists are hardly aware of it?
Niels Harrit   It is a collective name for substances with high levels of energy.
If civilian researchers (like myself) are not familiar with it, it is probably because they do not do much work with explosives.
As for military scientists, you would have to ask them.
I do not know how familiar they are with nanotechnology.
Danish TV2   So you found this substance in the WTC, why do you think it caused the collapses?
Niels Harrit   Well, it's an explosive.   Why else would it be there?
Danish TV2   You believe the intense heat melted the building?s steel support structure, and caused the building to collapse like a house of cards?
Niels Harrit   I cannot say precisely, as this substance can serve both purposes.
It can explode and break things apart, and it can melt things.
Both effects were probably used, as I see it.
Molten metal pours out of the South Tower several minutes before the collapse.
This indicates the whole structure was being weakened in advance.
Then the regular explosives come into play.
The actual collapse sequence had to be perfectly timed, all the way down.
Danish TV2   What quantities are we talking about?
Niels Harrit   A lot.   There were only two planes, but three skyscrapers collapsed.
We know roughly how much dust was created.
The pictures show huge quantities, everything but the steel was pulverised.
And we know roughly how much unreacted thermite we have found.
911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 television.

Nano Thermite can explode and break things apart and it can melt things.

Explosives in World Trade Center - international researchers have found traces of explosives.

Image: Danish TV2
911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 television.

Both effects were probably used by the use of Nano Thermite as I see it.

Researchers found nano-thermite explosives in the dust and rubble of the World Trade Center buildings.

Image: Danish TV2
911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 television.

The use of nano thermite indicates the whole structure was being weakened in advance.

Researchers found nano-thermite explosives in the dust and rubble of the World Trade Center buildings that cannot have come from the planes.

Image: Danish TV2
This is the “loaded gun”, material that did not ignite for some reason.
We are talking about tonnes.   Over 10 tonnes, possibly 100 tonnes.
Danish TV2   Ten tonnes, possibly 100 tonnes, in three buildings?   And these substances are not normally found in such buildings?
Niels Harrit   No.   These materials are extremely advanced.
Danish TV2   How do you place such material in a skyscraper, on all the floors?
Niels Harrit   How you would get it in?
Danish TV2   Yes.
Niels Harrit   If I had to transport it in those quantities I would use pallets.   Get a truck and move it in on pallets.
Danish TV2   Why hasn't this been discovered earlier?
Niels Harrit   By whom?
Danish TV2   The caretakers, for example.     If you are moving 10 to 100 tonnes of nano-thermite around, and placing it on all the floors.     I am just surprised no-one noticed.
Niels Harrit   As a journalist, you should address that question to the company responsible for security at the WTC.
Danish TV2   So you are in no doubt the material was present?
Niels Harrit   You cannot fudge this kind of science.
We have found it.   Unreacted thermite.
Danish TV2   What responses has your article received around the world?
Niels Harrit   It is completely new knowledge for me.
It was only published last Friday.   So it is too early to say.
But the article may not be as groundbreaking as you think.
Hundreds of thousands of people around the world, have long known that the three buildings were demolished.
911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 television.

Once the nano thermite was used then the regular explosives come into play.

Explosives in World Trade Center - international researchers have found traces of explosives.

Image: Danish TV2
911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 television.

The actual collapse sequence had to be perfectly times, all the way down.

Researchers found nano-thermite explosives in the dust and rubble of the World Trade Center buildings.

Image: Danish TV2
911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 television.

And we know roughly how much unreacted thermite we have found.

Researchers found nano-thermite explosives in the dust and rubble of the World Trade Center buildings that cannot have come from the planes.

Image: Danish TV2
911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 television.

No.  These nano thermite materials are extremely advanced.

Researchers found nano-thermite explosives in the dust and rubble of the World Trade Center buildings that cannot have come from the planes.

The believe several tonnes of explosives were placed in the buildings in advance.

Image: Danish TV2
911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 television.

Nano thermite in the buildings - almost ten years have passed.

Nano-thermite contains more energy than dynamite and can be used as rocket fuel.

Researchers found nano-thermite explosives in the dust and rubble of the World Trade Center buildings that cannot have come from the planes.

The believe several tonnes of explosives were placed in the buildings in advance.

Image: Danish TV2
911 Controlled Demolition - Thermite - Nano Thermite - Iron Microspheres Confirm Unexplained Extreme Temperatures.

Niels Harrit interview on Danish TV2 television.

So you found nano-thermite in the World Trade Center buildings, why do you think it caused the collapses?

It was by chance that someone discovered nano thermite two years ago.

Researchers found nano-thermite explosives in the dust and rubble of the World Trade Center buildings that cannot have come from the planes.

The believe several tonnes of explosives were placed in the buildings in advance.

Image: Danish TV2
This has been crystal clear.
Our research is just the last nail in the coffin.
This is not the 'smoking gun', it is the 'loaded gun'.
Each day, thousands of people realise that the WTC was demolished.
That is something unstoppable.
Danish TV2   Why has no-one discovered earlier that there was nano-thermite in the buildings?   Almost ten years have passed.
Niels Harrit   You mean in the dust?
Danish TV2   Yes.
Niels Harrit   It was by chance that someone looked at the dust with a microscope.
They are tiny red chips.
The biggest are 1 mm in size, and can be seen with the naked eye.
But you need a microscope to see the vast majority.
It was by chance that someone discovered them two years ago.
Danish TV2   It has taken 18 months to prepare the scientific article you refer to.
Niels Harrit   It is a very comprehensive article based on thorough research.
Danish TV2   You have been working on this for several years, because it didn't make sense to you.
Niels Harrit   Yes, over two years actually.
It all started when I saw the collapse of Building 7, the third skyscraper.
It collapsed seven hours after the twin towers.
And there were only two airplanes.
When you see a 47-storey building, 186m tall, collapse in 6.5 seconds, and you are a scientist, you think “what?”.
I had to watch it again… and again.
I hit the button 10 times, and my jaw dropped lower and lower.
Firstly, I had never heard of that building before.
And there was no visible reason why it should collapse in that way, straight down, in 6.5 seconds.
I have had no rest since that day.
Danish TV2   Ever since 9/11 there has been speculation, and conspiracy theories.   What do you say to viewers who hear about your research and say, “we?ve heard it all before, there are lots of conspiracy theories”.   What would you say to convince them that this is different?
Niels Harrit   I think there is only one conspiracy theory worth mentioning, the one involving 19 hijackers.
I think viewers should ask themselves what evidence they have seen to support the official conspiracy theory.
If anyone has seen evidence, I would like to hear about it
No-one has been formally charged.   No-one is 'wanted'.
Our work should lead to demands for a proper criminal investigation of the 9/11 terrorist attack.
Because it never happened.   We are still waiting for it.
We hope our results will be used as technical evidence when that day comes.
Danish TV2   Niels Harrit, fascinating, thanks for coming in.
Niels Harrit   My pleasure
ITALIAN SAYS 9-11 SOLVED
It’s common knowledge, he reveals
CIA — Mossad behind terror attacks
By the Staff of American Free Press
Former Italian President Francesco Cossiga, who revealed the existence of Operation Gladio, has told Italy’s oldest and most widely read newspaper that the 9-11 terrorist attacks were run by the CIA and Mossad, and that this was common knowledge among global intelligence agencies.
In what translates awkwardly into English, Cossiga told the newspaper Corriere della Sera:
“All the [intelligence services] of America and Europe… know well that the disastrous attack has been planned and realized from the Mossad, with the aid of the Zionist world in order to put under accusation the Arabic countries and in order to induce the western powers to take part … in Iraq [and] Afghanistan.”
Cossiga was elected president of the Italian Senate in July 1983 before winning a landslide election to become president of the country in 1985, and he remained until 1992.
Cossiga’s tendency to be outspoken upset the Italian political establishment, and he was forced to resign after revealing the existence of, and his part in setting up, Operation Gladio.
This was a rogue intelligence network under NATO auspices that carried out bombings across Europe in the 1960s, 1970s and ’80s.
Gladio’s specialty was to carry out what they termed 'false flag' operations — terror attacks that were blamed on their domestic and geopolitical opposition.
In March 2001, Gladio agent Vincenzo Vinciguerra stated, in sworn testimony:
“You had to attack civilians, the people, women, children, innocent people, unknown people far removed from any political game.
The reason was quite simple: to force … the public to turn to the state to ask for greater security.”
Cossiga first expressed his doubts about 9-11 in 2001, and is quoted by 9-11 researcher Webster Tarpley saying:
“The mastermind of the attack must have been a sophisticated mind, provided with ample means not only to recruit fanatic kamikazes, but also highly specialized personnel.
I add one thing: it could not be accomplished without infiltrations in the radar and flight security personnel.”
Coming from a widely respected former head of state, Cossiga’s assertion that the 9-11 attacks were an inside job and that this is common knowledge among global intelligence agencies is illuminating.
It is one more eye-opening confirmation that has not been mentioned by America’s propaganda machine in print or on TV.
Nevertheless, because of his experience and status in the world, Cossiga cannot be discounted as a crackpot.
Free to redistribute as long as credit given to American Free Press
We have discovered distinctive red/gray chips in all the samples we have studied of the dust produced by the destruction of the World Trade Center.

One sample was collected by a Manhattan resident about ten minutes after the collapse of the second WTC Tower, two the next day, and a fourth about a week later.

The properties of these chips were analyzed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).

The red portion of these chips is found to be an unreacted thermitic material and highly energetic.

The carbon content of the red material indicates that an organic substance is present.

This would be expected for super-thermite formulations in order to produce high gas pressures upon ignition and thus make them explosive.

Photo: Bentham-Open.org
Active Thermitic Material Discovered in Dust from the 9/11 World Trade Center Catastrophe
Photo: Bentham-Open.org
Active Thermitic Material Discovered in Dust from the 9/11 World Trade Center Catastrophe
We have discovered distinctive red/gray chips in all the samples we have studied of the dust produced by the destruction of the World Trade Center.
One sample was collected by a Manhattan resident about ten minutes after the collapse of the second WTC Tower, two the next day, and a fourth about a week later.
The properties of these chips were analyzed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).
The red portion of these chips is found to be an unreacted thermitic material and highly energetic.
The carbon content of the red material indicates that an organic substance is present.
This would be expected for super-thermite formulations in order to produce high gas pressures upon ignition and thus make them explosive.
9/11
By all accounts, the unprecedented events of September 11th, 2001 changed the way our country functions, and in turn, the world.
It is therefore critical that conscientious Americans, as well as people around the globe, understand these events in detail.
Unfortunately the official reports, including The 9/11 Commission Report and the NIST WTC Report, written by those working under the direction of the Bush Administration, have been proven to be elaborate cover-ups.
Film: 9/11 Revisited
September 11th Revisited is perhaps the most riveting film ever made about the destruction of the World Trade Center.
This is a powerful documentary which features eyewitness accounts and archived news footage that was shot on September 11, 2001 but never replayed on television.
Featuring interviews with eyewitnesses & firefighters, along with expert analysis by Professor Steven E. Jones, Professor David Ray Griffin, MIT Engineer Jeffrey King, and Professor James H. Fetzer.
This film provides stunning evidence that explosives were used in the complete demolition of the WTC Twin Towers and WTC Building 7.
For Film: 9/11 Revisited
— Click Here
Film: 9/11 Press for Truth
An excellent documentary about the families of the victims of 9/11 and their fight to uncover and expose the truth about what happened that day.
For Film: 9/11 Press for Truth
— Click Here
Film: 9/11 Mysteries
90 minutes of pure demolition evidence and analysis, laced with staggering witness testimonials.
Moving from “the myth” through “the analysis” and into “the players,” careful deconstruction of the official story set right alongside clean, clear science.
The 9/11 picture is not one of politics or nationalism or loyalty, but one of strict and simple physics.   How do you get a 10-second 110-story pancake collapse?
'Oh!   You don't believe the 9-11 official version,' they say.
'You mean where they want you to accept the buildings were not blown up from below.
'Plane fuel!   Substance never burns higher then a gas stove!   That it caused the inner core steel to melt!
'Steel melting!
'Concrete vaporizing!
' 'No!   I don't believe that conspiracy theory.
'Cheney!   Bush!   Rudy Giuliani!   HA!  HA!
'Tower 7 that never had a plane hit — just came tumbling down!
'You believe that, eh!
'Ever think it had to be blown up because the plane scheduled to fly into it was off getting shot down.
'Thermite in Tower 7's walls, you see — incriminating evidence — impossible to get out without people watching!
Had to be blown up!
'Next you'll be saying Obama is not a Wall Street Illuminati banker stooge?
'Take your pick:   The partner in a comedy team who feeds lines to the other comedians.
'Him who allows himself to be used.
'Oh!   I can't really blame you,   Television it turns minds to pulp.
'Turn off the television.   It's the only way.'
'Turn off the television?'
'Get rid of it really.   I mean what else is there to do!'
'Get rid of the television?'
'Don't forget all radio garbage is propaganda, even the songs.
'Then those five minute propaganda hits they send you every hour!
'The ones they refer to as News
'Get rid of all the propaganda from your brain, the only way to do it.'
'Stop being hooked on those Hollywood movies — even those that make you think they are making you think'
'All paid performers to make your brain dead.
'You turn the brainwashing off, you'll begin to become yourself.
'It really is the only way!'
'Oh!'
Kewe — TheWE.cc
 
 
  Protests around world every 11th of month
 
BBC — Sunday, 3 June 2007
Gorbachev criticises US 'empire'
Mikhail Gorbachev.

Moscow may target weapons at Europe if the US builds planned missile defence facilities in the region, Russian President Vladimir Putin has said.

Russia has not pointed missiles towards Europe since the end of the Cold War.

The former Soviet leader, Mikhail Gorbachev, has blamed the US for the current state of relations between Russia and the West.

In a BBC interview, Mr Gorbachev said that the Russians were ready to be constructive, but America was trying to squeeze them out of global diplomacy.

Mr Gorbachev accused America of ' empire-building ', which he said the UK should have warned it away from.
Mr Gorbachev said relations between Russia and the West were in a bad state
Gorbachev interview
The former Soviet leader, Mikhail Gorbachev, has blamed the US for the current state of relations between Russia and the West.
In a BBC interview, Mr Gorbachev said that the Russians were ready to be constructive, but America was trying to squeeze them out of global diplomacy.
He added that the Iraq War had undermined Tony Blair's credibility.
Mr Gorbachev accused America of "empire-building", which he said the UK should have warned it away from.
'New empire'
Moscow and the West have been in dispute over Iraq, America's plans for a missile defence system and civil rights within Russia itself.
Britain's extradition request for a Russian man in connection with the murder of ex-agent Alexander Litvinenko has also caused tension.
In an interview with Radio Four's The World This Weekend, Mr Gorbachev said relations between Russia and the West were in a bad state.
If the American nuclear potential grows in European territory, we have to give ourselves new targets in Europe
President Vladimir Putin
"Well, it's worse than I expected," he said through a translator.
"We lost 15 years after the end of the Cold War, but the West I think and particularly the United States, our American friends, were dizzy with their success, with the success of their game that they were playing, a new empire.
"I don't understand why you, the British, did not tell them, 'Don't think about empire, we know about empires, we know that all empires break up in the end, so why start again to create a new mess.'"
He added that the war with Iraq had damaged Britain's relationship with Russia after a promising start.
"Tony Blair and Putin established a very good relationship and that made it possible to advance our relationship," he said.
"But then Iraq happened and Tony found himself in the embrace of that military monster, of that war situation, and he lost a lot of his credibility in the world and in Europe."
Your life, your children's lives —
Will you live or die?
Decided by small group of elite.
Pure evil
It doesn't get any clearer than this
 
Published on Friday, March 2, 2007 by the Los Angeles Times
US to Develop New Hydrogen Bomb
by Ralph Vartabedian
The Energy Department will announce today a contract to develop the nation's first new hydrogen bomb in two decades, involving a collaboration between three national weapons laboratories, The Times has learned.
The new bomb will include design features from all three labs, though Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the Bay Area appears to have taken the lead position in the project. The Los Alamos and Sandia labs in New Mexico will also be part of the project.
If you never see another movie, better watch this: the old original version still allowed on Google video
For Google video version — click here — it will state this version is old!
This version is not censored — it is infinitely better then the newer censored version
To download this version and keep
http://keepvid.com
copy and paste
http://video.google.co.uk/videoplay?docid=5547481422995115331
P.S. The new Zeitgeist movie is loaded with political rhetoric
It cannot be more opposite of the sense of Zeitgeist — a German word meaning 'Of the time'
AND don't forget this:
Pandora's Black Box Chapter Two — click here
Every missile has a home.

Photo: Alaska Image Library
Every missile has a home
(No Mortgages to Worry About)
Image: Natasha Mayers
It's kind of a fun game
You see the aim of those inner forces who guide the Elite —
For them the real agenda is to kill you
your children
your grandchildren
It is to have fun watching your stupidity as you destroy your planet
But most haven't figured it out yet!
If you stop them with the nuclear weapons — then it's the 400+ MPH, KPH wind, the UVB, UVC, UVA rays due to loss of stratospheric ozone.
It's the climate!
Your Elite — tools and servants of Lucifer
The fall of Lucifer, Gustave Doré's illustration for Paradise Lost by John Milton.

Photo: wikipedia.org/
The fall of Lucifer
Gustave Doré's illustration for Paradise Lost by John Milton
Unspeakable grief and horror
                        ...and the circus of deception continues...
He says, "You are quite mad, Kewe"
And of course I am.
Why, I don't believe any of it — not the bloody body, not the bloody mind, not even the bloody Universe, or is it bloody multiverse.
"It's all illusion," I say.   "Don't you know, my lad, my lassie.   The game!   The game, me girl, me boy!   Takes on interest, don't you know.   T'is me sport, till doest find a better!"
Pssssst — but all this stuff is happening down here
Let's change it!
To say hello:     hello[the at marker]Kewe.info
For Kewe's spiritual and metaphysical pages — click here
US destroyed Fallujah as it tries to destroy the rest of Iraq
Published on Monday, July 4, 2005 by CommonDreams.org
by Sheldon Drobny
Justice O'Connor's decision in Bush v. Gore led to the current Bush administration's execution of war crimes and atrocities in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other places in the Middle East that are as egregious as those committed by the Third Reich and other evil governments in human history.
The lesson is clear.
Those people who may be honorable and distinguished in their chosen profession should always make decisions based upon good rather than evil no matter where their nominal allegiances may rest.
Justice O'Connor was quoted to have said something to the affect that she abhorred the thought of Bush losing the 2000 election to Gore.
She was known to have wanted to retire after the 2000 election for same reason she is now retiring.
She wanted to spend more time with her sick husband.
Unfortunately, she tarnished her distinguished career with the deciding vote in Bush v. Gore by going along with the partisan majority of the Court to interfere with a democratic election that she and the majority feared would be lost in an honest recount.
She dishonored herself and the Supreme Court by succumbing to party allegiances and not The Constitution to which she swore to uphold.
And the constitutional argument she and the majority used to justify their decision was the Equal Protection Clause.
The Equal Protection Clause was the ultimate basis for the decision, but the majority essentially admitted (what was obvious in any event) that it was not basing its conclusion on any general view of what equal protection requires.
The decision in Bush v Gore was not dictated by the law in any sense—either the law found through research, or the law as reflected in the kind of intuitive sense that comes from immersion in the legal culture.
The Equal Protection clause is generally used in matters concerning civil rights.
The majority ignored their basic conservative views supporting federalism and states' rights in order to justify their decision.
History will haunt these justices down for their utter lack of justice and the hypocrisy associated with this decision.
Sheldon Drobny is Co-founder of Air America Radio.
Mother her two babies killed by US
More than Fifteen million
US dollars given by US taxpayers to Israel each day for their military use
4 billion US dollars per year
Nanci Pelosi — U.S. House Democratic leader — Congresswoman California, 8th District
Speaking at the AIPAC agenda   May 26, 2005
There are those who contend that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is all about Israel's occupation of the West Bank and Gaza.   This is absolute nonsense.
In truth, the history of the conflict is not over occupation, and never has been:  it is over the fundamental right of Israel to exist.
The greatest threat to Israel's right to exist, with the prospect of devastating violence, now comes from Iran.
For too long, leaders of both political parties in the United States have not done nearly enough to confront the Russians and the Chinese, who have supplied Iran as it has plowed ahead with its nuclear and missile technology....
In the words of Isaiah, we will make ourselves to Israel 'as hiding places from the winds and shelters from the tempests; as rivers of water in dry places; as shadows of a great rock in a weary land.'
Pelosi
       Afghanistan — Western Terror States: Canada, US, UK, France, Germany, Italy       
       Photos of Afghanistan people being killed and injured by NATO     
From the video 'Holes in Heaven' — Brooks Agnew, Earth Tornographer
In 1983 I did radio tornography with 30 watts looking for oil in the ground.
I found 26 oil wells over a nine state area.
100 hundred percent of the time was accurate, which is just 30 watts of power beaming straight into solid rock.
HAARP uses a billion watts beamed straight into the ionosphere for experiments.
Picture these strings on the piano as layers of the Earth, each one has its own frequency.
What we used to do is beam radio waves into the ground and it would vibrate any 'strings' that were present in the ground.
We might get a sound back like ___ and we would say, that's natural gas.
We might get a sound back like ____ and we'd say that's crude oil.
We were able to identify each frequency.
We accomplished this with just 30 watts of radio power.
If you do this with a billion watts the vibrations are so violent that the entire piano would shake.
In fact the whole house would shake.
In fact the vibrations could be so severe under ground they could even cause an earthquake.
Download or watch   HAARP Holes in Heaven
— Complete version available for mp4 download
Download or watch movie on HAARP — Advanced US Military research weapon on behaviour modification
weather change, ionesphere manipulation — click here
Download or watch audio of Dr. Nick Begich talking on HAARP
— The 2006 update to 'Angels Don't Play This HAARP'.
'Angels Still Don't Play This HAARP: Advances In Tesla Technology'.
Planet Earth Weapon by Rosalie Bertell
ozone, HAARP, chemtrails, space war — click here
What HAARP Is.. And Everything Its Used For
Full HAARP Documentary — click here
Angels Dont Play This HAARP weather manipulation
1 hour 36 minutes video — click here
(poor quality to watch but well worth listening)
Dr. Nick Begich, his book and his articles can be found here
       http://www.earthpulse.com/      
Article on Chemtrails — unusual cloud formations in the US.
Published on Monday, July 4, 2005 by CommonDreams.org
by Sheldon Drobny
Justice O'Connor's decision in Bush v. Gore led to the current Bush administration's execution of war crimes and atrocities in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other places in the Middle East that are as egregious as those committed by the Third Reich and other evil governments in human history.
US destroyed Fallujah as it tries to destroy the rest of Iraq
The lesson is clear.
Those people who may be honorable and distinguished in their chosen profession should always make decisions based upon good rather than evil no matter where their nominal allegiances may rest.
Justice O'Connor was quoted to have said something to the affect that she abhorred the thought of Bush losing the 2000 election to Gore.
She was known to have wanted to retire after the 2000 election for same reason she is now retiring.
She wanted to spend more time with her sick husband.
Unfortunately, she tarnished her distinguished career with the deciding vote in Bush v. Gore by going along with the partisan majority of the Court to interfere with a democratic election that she and the majority feared would be lost in an honest recount.
She dishonored herself and the Supreme Court by succumbing to party allegiances and not The Constitution to which she swore to uphold.
And the constitutional argument she and the majority used to justify their decision was the Equal Protection Clause.
The Equal Protection Clause was the ultimate basis for the decision, but the majority essentially admitted (what was obvious in any event) that it was not basing its conclusion on any general view of what equal protection requires.
The decision in Bush v Gore was not dictated by the law in any sense—either the law found through research, or the law as reflected in the kind of intuitive sense that comes from immersion in the legal culture.
The Equal Protection clause is generally used in matters concerning civil rights.
The majority ignored their basic conservative views supporting federalism and states' rights in order to justify their decision.
History will haunt these justices down for their utter lack of justice and the hypocrisy associated with this decision.
Sheldon Drobny is Co-founder of Air America Radio.
U.S. Bombing of Fallujah
— the Third World War continued: Chechnya, North Ossetia, Ingushetia
More atrocities - Ahmed and Asma, story of two children dying
al-Sadr City
Iraq's real WMD crime - the effects of depleted uranium
World War Two soldiers did not kill Kill ratio Korea, Vietnam. Iraq.
Afghanistan - Terror?
Photos over past three months.
Aid agencies compromised by US actions
US soldiers committing suicide Afghanistan Iraq — Most Recent
Psychologist Pete Linnerooth was one of three who were part of a mental health crew in charge of the US 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division in the Baghdad area of Iraq.   Pete Linnerooth committed suicide by turning a gun upon himself in January of 2013
Veterans kill themselves at a rate of one every 80 minutes.   More than 6,500 veteran suicides are logged every year — more than the total number of soldiers killed in Afghanistan and Iraq combined since those wars began.
Mary Coghill Kirkland said she asked her son, 21-year-old Army Spc. Derrick Kirkland, what was wrong as soon as he came back from his first deployment to Iraq in 2008.   He had a ready answer: "Mom, I'm a murderer."
A military base on the brink
As police agents watched he shot himself in the head
Murders, fights, robberies, domestic violence, drunk driving, drug overdoses
US soldiers committing suicide Afghanistan Iraq II
U.S. Soldier Killed Herself After Objecting to Interrogation Techniques
Private Gary Boswell, 20, from Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire, was found hanging in a playground in July
She is Jeanne "Linda" Michel, a Navy medic.   She came home last month to her husband and three kids ages 11, 5, and 4, delighted to be back in her suburban home of Clifton Park in upstate New York.   Two weeks after she got home, she shot and killed herself.
Peterson refused to participate in the torture after only two nights working in the unit known as the cage
     United States Numb to Iraq Troop Deaths       
     All papers relating to the interrogations have been destroyed     
      We stripped them and were supposed to mock them and degrade their manhood     
US soldiers committing suicide Iraq Vietnam
The Iraq War - complete listing of articles, includes images
The House of Saud and Bush
       All with U.S. Money:       
       US and Israel War Crimes       
All with U.S. Money:
Israel agents stole identity of New Zealand cerebral palsy victim.
(IsraelNN.com July 15, 2004) The Foreign Ministry will take steps towards restoring relations with New Zealand. New Zealand Prime Minister Helen Clark today announced she was implementing diplomatic sanctions after two Israelis were sentenced on charges of attempting to obtain illegal passports. Despite Israeli refusal to respond to the accusations, the two are labeled in the New Zealand media as Mossad agents acting on behalf of the Israeli intelligence community.

Foreign Ministry officials stated they will do everything possible to renew diplomatic ties, expressing sorrow over the "unfortunate incident".
Projected mortality rate of Sudan refugee starvation deaths — Darfur pictures
Suicide now top killer of Israeli soldiers
Atrocities files - graphic images
'Suicide bombings,' the angel said, 'and beheadings.'
'And the others that have all the power - they fly missiles in the sky.
They don't even look at the people they kill.'
       The real Ronald Reagan       
       — Nicaragua, Guatemala, El Salvador, South Africa        
Follow the torture trail...
       Cowardly attacks by air killing men women and children in their homes, often never seeing those they kill as the drones or aircraft fly back to the cowardly bases       
       If they kill only the husband, see how they care for the family they have destroyed       
       Afghanistan — Western Terror States: Canada, US, UK, France, Germany, Italy       
       Photos of Afghanistan people being killed and injured by NATO     
        When you talk with God        
         were you also spending your time, money and energy, killing people?         
       Are they now alive or dead?       
Photos July 2004
US Debt
Photos June 2004
Lest we forget - Ahmed and Asma, story of two children dying
Photos May 2004
American military: Abu Gharib (Ghraib) prison photos, humiliation and torture
- London Daily Mirror article: non-sexually explicit pictures
Photos April 2004
The celebration of Jerusalem day, the US missiles that rained onto children in Gaza,
and, a gathering of top articles over the past nine months
Photos March 2004
The Iraq War - complete listing of articles, includes images
Photos February 2004
US missiles - US money - and Palestine
Photos January 2004
Ethnic cleansing in the Beduin desert
Photos December 2003
Shirin Ebadi Nobel Peace Prize winner 2003
Photos November 2003
Atrocities - graphic images...
Photos October 2003
Aljazeerah.info
Photos September 2003
Kewe Archives kewe archives       kewe archives TheWE.cc