For archives, these articles are being stored on TheWE.cc website.
The purpose is to advance understandings of environmental, political,
human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues.

 
How much of this page and my comments based on false statistics?
How much is real?
I don’t know of an issue of a greater magnitude than the energy issue that humanity’s facing right now.
Oh my God, we’re having wars in, you know, Asia, killing millions of people over the hydrocarbons.
The issue is so multi-faceted, it’s so immense, that... Oh yes, this is being very carefully managed.
'Researchers have found that when humans simply think about the possibility of extra senses, new dendrites grow between their brain cells.
In other words, the simple awareness of extra senses, or dimensions, may allow us to grow brain connections to actually accommodate such an awareness.'
You see when people, and increasingly more and more of you humans, tell you that the Illuminati try to keep you dumbed down, there's reasoning behind those words.
Kewe.
Your Environment"Sometimes you can see how there is erosion, and you can see how there is deforestation.
It's very widespread in some parts of the world.
We would like to see, from the astronauts' point of view, people take good care of the Earth and replace the resources that have been used."
Astronaut Commander Eileen Collins making her fourth flight on shuttle Discovery
What They Don't Want You to Read
In a moment of unexpected enlightenment Mr. Bush has realized that one of the best ways to control what people think is to control the kinds of information to which people have access.
Here is what Mr. Bush has done to restrict the scientific information available to would-be students towards the end of 2006.
He is closing all the libraries run by the Environmental Protection Agency and getting rid of pesky and superfluous scientific documents found in those libraries.
The EPA has maintained 29 libraries around the United States for many years that contain information about human health, environmental issues, hazardous waste, pollution control, air quality and all manner of other things with which the EPA concerns itself.
In the 2007 library services budget request by the EPA, Mr. Bush cut $2 million out of the $2.5 million requested.
In anticipation of Congressional approval the EPA has already closed its library in Washington D.C. to the public and has completely closed libraries in Chicago, Dallas and Kansas City, Mo.
In a letter to Congress protesting the cuts, EPA scientists observe that the $2 million cut is a small part of an $8 billion budget.
That will not change Mr. Bush's mind.
Having little, if any knowledge himself and not having found that an impediment to becoming president, he sees no harm in making it harder for others to acquire that which he is lacking.
Closing libraries is not the only way Mr. Bush hopes to keep citizens from being infected by knowledge.
Scientists at the EPA, like its libraries, have been muzzled....
      Burning EPA's Books        
Friends of the mountains.

Global youth climate movement.

Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil.

Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation, sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice.

Big Trees as Natural Monuments

Big Trees as Curiosities

Big Trees as Recreation

Big Trees as Cathedrals of Nature

Endangered Big Trees

From Sacred Symbol to Industrial Stumpage

Photo: http://itsgettinghotinhere.org/
Friends of the mountains
Global youth climate movement
Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil
Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation
Sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice
Until recently, for example, the Jakobshavn glacier, Greenland's largest, was shrinking 3 miles per year.
But since 2002, it's been shedding up to 6 miles of ice per year, said Eric Rignot, an ice-sheet expert at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.
Santa Maria del Pinar, near Guadalajara.

Trees burn by the village of Santa Maria del Pinar, near Guadalajara, on one front of a raging forest fire, July 2005.

Emergency workers evacuated the bodies of 11 volunteer firefighters who died at the weekend in a massive forest fire in central Spain, the deadliest such blaze in more than 10 years.

The fire, which began in pine woodland at Cueva de los Casares on Saturday, has destroyed up to 12,000 hectares.

Photo: AFP/Pedro Armestre

In the past three years, Portugal has lost 870,000 hectares (2,149,817 acres) of forest to fires.    (August 2006)
In northern Portugal, residents of Valongo, near Porto, were reported to be very frightened as flames were approaching their houses.
Forest fires have been burning in Spain and Portugal, which like the rest of Europe is again suffering from drought, a continuation of drought of three years, leaving the countrysides like tinderboxes.

A record loss of sea ice in the Arctic summer 2005 has convinced scientists that the northern hemisphere may have crossed a critical threshold beyond which the climate may never recover.

Scientists fear that the Arctic has now entered an irreversible phase of warming which will accelerate the loss of the polar sea ice that has helped to keep the climate stable for thousands of years.
Dr Serreze: "This will be four Septembers in a row that we've seen a downward trend.  The feeling is we are reaching a tipping point or threshold beyond which sea ice will not recover."
Professor Wadhams: "As the sea ice melts, and more of the sun's energy is absorbed by the exposed ocean, a positive feedback is created leading to the loss of yet more ice."
"If anything we may be underestimating the dangers.  The computer models may not take into account collaborative positive feedback."
"Sea ice keeps a cap on frigid water, keeping it cold and protecting it from heating up."
"Losing the sea ice of the Arctic is likely to have major repercussions for the climate."
"There could be dramatic changes to the climate of the northern region due to the creation of a vast expanse of open water where there was once effectively land."
"You're essentially changing land into ocean and the creation of a huge area of open ocean where there was once land will have a very big impact on other climate parameters."

See Speak Hear.

Global youth climate movement.

Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil.

Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation, sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice.

Big Trees as Natural Monuments

Big Trees as Curiosities

Big Trees as Recreation

Big Trees as Cathedrals of Nature

Endangered Big Trees

From Sacred Symbol to Industrial Stumpage

Photo: http://itsgettinghotinhere.org/
See Speak Hear
Global youth climate movement
Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil
Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation
Sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice
"We Can't Say We Weren't Warned"
By Jean-Marcel Bouguereau
Le Nouvel Observateur
Wednesday 31 January 2007
[Images inserted by TheWE.cc]
Bater island
What's happened?
Why this sudden keen interest in climatic phenomena?
I have to say that each of us has had an opportunity to become aware of the seriousness of the situation with the mood swings of a climate that's become erratic.
New bases for recent anguish
But the 500 delegates meeting in Paris under the aegis of the United Nations, the same ones whose first work had served as the foundation for the famous Kyoto Protocol, will - between now and Friday — give new bases for this recent anguish.
"Indefinite growth is impossible, we only have one Earth, but a civilization of happiness is possible.
Solutions exist, but public opinion ignores them, since the present power structures and those who wield economic and political power oppose those solutions."
That's what René Dumont, the first ecologist candidate for [French] president, said as early as 1974.
Beluga whale
Preaching in the desert
While he was preaching in the desert then and only garnered a weak 1.3 percent of votes, thirty years later all the candidates are pushing one another to sign Nicolas Hulot's "ecological pact."
Suddenly, people are sounding the alarm everywhere.
Not without some hypocrisy.
Even George Bush mentions, thanks to new technologies, a "post-Kyoto strategy" — while he's refused to sign that protocol.
Davos!!!
And in Davos, the heads of companies have just salved their collective conscience by increasing the numbers of debates and roundtables on climate change.
But only 20 percent of them consider protection of the environment to be a priority.
Low Sea Ice
concentration
North of Svalbard
Norway
Capitalism that can't allow itself
These company bosses know that the break with growth that the Rome Club advocated as far back as 1972 is a death sentence for a capitalism that can't allow itself a drastic reduction in production and material consumption.
It's a whole different economy that must be put into effect, based on other values.
And unless we confront that unknown, we are in the process of compromising the life of future generations.
The problem is that when they are questioned, the ardor of the French to act against global warming is as hypocritical as that of company bosses: 93 percent are ready to systematically sort their garbage or to decrease their electricity and water consumption, but that proportion falls to 61 percent when it comes to using the car less often.
We are running into a wall.
But no one can say we weren't warned.
Caribou cow
and calf
Yukon territory
Canada
Don't forget Gore as Vice President broke the Senate deadlock
voting as Vice-President, a tie-breaking vote, for NAFTA
Hillary Clinton, Obama and Gore are not fit to be president

Gore implores scientists to raise alarms
Ex-VP calls for research to be used for policy change
[Many people believe that taxing people is not the answer to global warming
I do not disagree with that
Taxing the ordinary person means the rich and the those who control the corporations continue to control you
Kewe]
Jane Kay, Chronicle Environment Writer
Wednesday, December 10, 2003

Al Gore, who emerged from political defeat to attain celebrity status as a harbinger of the hazards of global warming, told thousands of scientists Thursday in San Francisco that they have a responsibility to translate their research into possible policy solutions.
St. Basil's Cathedral
No Snow!
Moscow's Red Square
Warmest November-December since records began
Former Vice President Gore, presidential candidate turned climate crusader, spoke at the annual meeting of the world's largest scientific society, the American Geophysical Union.
He urged scientists to communicate the climate crisis “in ways that arouse appropriate alarm that can motivate changes in behavior.”
From his opening line (“I am Al Gore.   I used to be the next president of the United States”) to his closing advice to speak out against censorship and manipulation of research, he used dry humor and impassioned pleas to encourage the scientists to play a new role in society.
“For civilization as a whole, we've somehow persuaded ourselves that we don't have to care about what happens to future generations,” he said to about 7,000 scientists, including 3,000 in an overflow room at the Marriott Hotel.   “We have a duty to act on the basis of the best evidence.”
Even after 40 years of following the science of climate change, he said he was surprised to learn this week about new, earlier projections for when the Arctic sea ice will completely melt during the summertime.   That research came from scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado.
“I was shocked that their horizon was 34 years under a business-as-usual scenario.   If we allow it to go, it won't come back under any timetable relevant to the human species,” Gore said.
Gore said he understands scientists' "frustration of completing work and having it mischaracterized.
“Some information is misused,'' he said, and there are efforts to silence scientists.
He spoke of a news story Thursday about the Bush administration instructing U.S. Geological Survey scientists to submit scientific papers and other public documents for screening by supervisors.   Other federal scientists, such as those at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, have also been censored.
Purging of data
He also criticized the closing of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency libraries and purging of data, contrary to congressional direction.
Gore called it an effort to politicize science.
He now runs Generation Investment Management and Current TV as well as serving as a consultant to Google and as a board member of Apple.   His book, “An Inconvenient Truth,'' is a best-seller, and his documentary is being talked about as a possible Oscar nominee.
He appeared at the Commonwealth Club later Thursday afternoon with a panel including Sen. Barbara Boxer, who is chairwoman-elect of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee; Duke Energy CEO Paul Anderson; and Stanford University climate scientist Stephen Schneider.   The experts, along with venture capitalists Vinod Khosla and Dan Reicher, discussed ways to curb carbon dioxide emissions with Carl Pope, executive director of the Sierra Club.
The business people agreed that there are generally technological solutions for improving energy efficiency and replacing oil, coal and plastics.
“But no solution works in the marketplace unless it's cheaper than fossil fuel,” Khosla said.
At present, there is no real incentive for corporations to invest in ways to cut emissions because there has been no clear signal from Washington on what the future regulatory picture will be, Duke's Anderson said.
©2006 San Francisco Chronicle
2006 greatest loss of ozone ever
Long wave heat emissions from Earth are being recorded as staying in the troposphere instead of flowing into and heating the stratosphere.
Due to pollution, gases, built as bands, are absorbing heat emissions from the surface of the planet.
Stratospheric temperatures taken since 1970 are showing a trend in the lowering of temperature in the stratosphere.
As mean global surface temperatures have increased, stratosphere temperatures have lowered.
Stratospheric ozone creation is reduced as the temperature drops.
Ozone is produced when oxygen absorbs the UVC end of the ultraviolet spectrum.
Something that occurs with the slight warming of the stratosphere through long wave heat emmissions from Earth.
With the stratosphere remaining colder, less ozone is produced to replenish ozone O3 lost through various natural phenomena, such as separating into radical O and oxygen O2 molecules.
       How ozone is made and destroyed — click here      
The last three years has seen the ozone hole over Antarctica equal or just below the all time record, 28 million square kilometres, roughly twice the size of Antarctica.
2006 sees greatest loss of ozone ever
The 2006 ozone hole area has become more depleted in the late Austral winter than an all time record of 28 million square kilometres reached in 2000.
Data from European Space Agency Envisat satellite show that some 40 million tonnes of ozone was destroyed during the 2006 southern hemisphere winter.
This is one million tonnes greater than the ozone loss previous record of 2000.
The largeness of the 2006 hole, combined with the most thinning of ozone reached in 1998, has resulted in a new depletion record for ozone in the stratosphere.
Ozone layer hits new depletion record as of 2006
Scientists from NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colo., use balloon-borne instruments to measure ozone directly over the South Pole.
By Oct. 9, the total column ozone had plunged to 93 DU from approximately 300 DU in mid-July.
More importantly, nearly all of the ozone in the layer between eight and 13 miles above the Earth's surface had been destroyed.
In this critical layer, the instrument measured a record low of only 1.2 DU., having rapidly plunged from an average non-hole reading of 125 DU in July and August.
The numbers mean the ozone is virtually gone in this layer of the atmosphere said David Hofmann director of the Global Monitoring Division at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory.
The well published 'guess' that the Ozone hole will begin to close by 2018 or become closed by 2060 is more a political wish of the US President and politicians in power in the US rather than science.
Observations by Aura's Microwave Limb Sounder show extremely high levels of ozone destroying chlorine chemicals in the lower stratosphere (approximately 12.4 miles high).
These high chlorine values covered the entire Antarctic region in mid to late September.
The high chlorine levels were accompanied by extremely low values of ozone.
Ozone in the stratosphere is an extremely important factor — one of the basic elements that has allowed the creation of animal and plant life on the planet.
Greenhouse gases, though minor components of the atmosphere, have an enormous influence on the troposphere and stratosphere.
With no check on greenhouse gasses and their subsequent effect on Earth's climate, and the ozone containing stratosphere, the loss of the entire web of life, including human continued existence here, has become no longer some discussion or theory.
Human, animal, and most plant life here, is now seriously threatened.

This year the water is draining away even faster than the last one — and there are still more than three months of the dry season to go.
I am very concerned.

Otavio Luz Castello, Mamiraua Reserve, Brazil Amazon
How much of this page is based on false statistics?
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Don't burn our future.

Global youth climate movement.

Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil.

Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation, sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice.

Big Trees as Natural Monuments

Big Trees as Curiosities

Big Trees as Recreation

Big Trees as Cathedrals of Nature

Endangered Big Trees

From Sacred Symbol to Industrial Stumpage

Photo: http://itsgettinghotinhere.org/
Don't burn our future
Global youth climate movement
Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil
Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation
Sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice
Global growth in carbon emissions is 'out of control'
The growth in global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuels over the past five years was four times greater than for the preceding 10 years, according to a study that exposes critical flaws in the attempts to avert damaging climate change.
By Steve Connor Science Editor
Published: 11 November 2006
The World Health Organisation (WHO) is considering whether there is a case for an investigation into the injuries amid suspicions by the medics that the injuries were inflicted by what they claim may have been unidentified "non-conventional" weapons.
Beside especially severe burning "down to the bones", the doctors say that, in other cases, internal organs have been ruptured without any obvious sign of shrapnel wounds.
Data on carbon dioxide emissions shows that the global growth rate was 3.2 per cent in the five years to 2005 compared with 0.8 per cent from 1990 to 1999, despite efforts to reduce carbon pollution through the Kyoto agreement.
Much of the increase is probably due to the expansion of the Chinese economy, which has relied heavily on burning coal and other fossil fuels for its energy.
Dr Mike Raupach, chair of the Global Carbon Project, an international collaboration of researchers who compiled the latest figures, warned yesterday that emissions were spiralling out of control.
"This is a very worrying sign. It indicates that recent efforts to reduce emissions have had virtually no impact on emissions growth and that effective caps are urgently needed," he said.
Current levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are 380 parts per million (ppm), about 100ppm higher than before the Industrial Revolution 200 years ago.
Some computer models predict damaging and irreversible climate change if carbon dioxide levels rise above 450ppm or 500 ppm.
The rate of increase of emissions suggests it may soon be impossible to avoid some of the worst-case scenarios, said Josep Canadell, executive director of the Global Carbon Project.
"On our current path, we will find it extremely difficult to rein in carbon emissions enough to stabilise the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration at 450ppm, and even 550ppm will be a challenge," he said.
The concerns were aired at the weekend by a group of Palestinian medics during a visit to Gaza by a delegation from Physicians for Human Rights - Israel (PHR).
He warned Ms The delegation agreed to take away fragments of tissue from the bodies of Palestinians killed during the recent military operations in Gaza for possible analysis in Israel but urged the medics to seek an international investigation.
Dr Ambrogio Manenti, the head of the WHO's West Bank and Gaza office, said the organisation had undertaken a short preliminary assessment of the claims and had now referred the issue to the organisation's headquarters in Geneva so that it can decide whether fuller investigation was appropriate.
The Israel Defence Forces said yesterday all its "weapons and ammunition are legal under international law and conform with international standards".
It said it could not respond in greater detail without more information about the injuries.
The last time the planet experienced levels as high as 500ppm was about 20 or 40 million years ago, when sea levels were 100 metres higher than today.
The Stern report earlier this month warned that the uncontrolled release of greenhouse gases could lead to a rise in average global temperatures of up to 5C by 2100 - about the same temperature difference between now and the last ice age.
Scientist have warned that global temperatures will continue to rise for many decades after carbon dioxide concentrations have stabilised due to the environmental inertia of the world's climate system.
Dr Peter Falloon, a climate impact scientist at the Met Office's Hadley Centre, said the latest findings did not augur well for attempts at averting climate change.
"It's not what we want or hope to see. The concern comes from the fact that the greater the emissions are now, the harder it will be to bring them down in the future," he said.
"It takes 30 or 40 years to realise the change in carbon dioxide emissions. It highlights how important it is to take quick and effective action now."
Professor Bill McGuire, director of the Benfield Hazard Research Centre in London, said: "This is more very bad news. We need a 60 to 70 per cent cut in emissions, but instead, emission levels are spiralling out of control.
"The sum total of our meagre efforts to cut emissions amounts to less than zero."
©2006 Independent Digital (UK) Ltd.  All rights reserved
Unite to fight global warming.

Global youth climate movement.

Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil.

Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation, sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice.

Big Trees as Natural Monuments

Big Trees as Curiosities

Big Trees as Recreation

Big Trees as Cathedrals of Nature

Endangered Big Trees

From Sacred Symbol to Industrial Stumpage

Photo: http://itsgettinghotinhere.org/
Unite to fight global warming
Global youth climate movement
Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil
Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation
Sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice
        Global warming has reached point of no return?        
        Arctic warming at twice global rate        
Ireland
Climate change is affecting Ireland at an increasingly rapid pace
Tomsk State University — 11 August, 2005 — researcher Sergei Kirpotin
All happened in the last three or four years
The huge expanse of western Siberia is thawing for the first time since its formation, 11,000 years ago.
This could potentially act as a tipping point, causing global warming to snowball, scientists fear.
More than 90% of the original national forest cover has now been lost.
The situation is an "ecological landslide that is probably irreversible and is undoubtedly connected to climatic warming," researcher Sergei Kirpotin, of Tomsk State University, Russia, told New Scientist magazine.
The whole western Siberian sub-Arctic region has started to thaw, he added, and this "has all happened in the last three or four years".
        Siberia, Alaska        
        Dramatic permafrost melt — click here       
2010 hottest first 6 months ever recorded         
        2005 hottest year on record,         
        2004 4th hottest,        
        2003 3rd hottest,        
        2001-2002 tied for 2nd.        
One in six countries in the world face food shortages this year (2005) because of severe droughts that could become semi-permanent under climate change, UN scientists warned.
(June 29, 2005)
Severe droughts have badly affected crops in Cuba, Cambodia, Australia, Afghanistan, Vietnam, Morocco, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Ethiopia, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Eritrea and Zambia.
Researchers are reporting a general drying of the land and growth of desertification in the Mediterranean region.
"The 20-year average clearly shows a dramatic increase of desertification and drought," said a leading agricultural economist, Professor Giovanni Quaranta, of the University of Basilicata in southern Italy.
       Ilulissat Glacier       
        A Wonder of the World Melting Away       
      Thule Inuit battle to stop Star Wars and to close US air base        
       World is actually running out of oil       
Less than three decades
Images: http://na.unep.net/

Devastating UN report showing explosive urban sprawl, major deforestation and the sucking dry of inland seas over less than three decades.
The destruction of swathes of mangroves in the Gulf of Fonseca off Honduras to make way for extensive shrimp farms shows up clearly.
The atlas makes the point that not only has it left the estuary bereft of the natural coastal defence provided by the mangroves, but the shrimp themselves have been linked to pollution and widespread damage to the area's eco-system.
"These illustrate some of the changes we have made to our environment," Kaveh Zahedi UN expert.
"Cities pull in huge amounts of resources including water, food, timber, metals and people. They export large amounts of wastes including household and industrial wastes, wastewater and the gases linked with global warming," UN Environment Programme chief Klaus Toepfer.
"Thus their impacts stretch beyond their physical borders affecting countries, regions and the planet as a whole."
       U.N. Website to download posters       
Indigenous Environmental Network

Global youth climate movement.

Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil.

Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation, sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice.

Big Trees as Natural Monuments

Big Trees as Curiosities

Big Trees as Recreation

Big Trees as Cathedrals of Nature

Endangered Big Trees

From Sacred Symbol to Industrial Stumpage

Photo: http://itsgettinghotinhere.org/
Indigenous Environmental Network
Global youth climate movement
Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil
Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation
Sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice
In 2001, for example, IBAMA (the Brazilian Environmental Agency) issued authorisation documents for deforestation of 5,342 hectares, but the total deforestation showed by satellite images from INPE (the Brazilian Institute of Space Research) reveals that 523,700 hectares were deforested.
In other words, in 2001 just 1% of the total deforestation area was authorized.
Previous years' data is similar.
 
Unemployment can be eliminated if governments established youth corps where people can work to tackle the environment
People of all ages can clean up the mess the world has caused if governments would direct their energies towards this rather than police and military expenditure
How much of this page is based on false statistics?
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http://www.democracynow.org/            September 1st, 2005
"Katrina's Real Name is Global Warming"
AMY GOODMAN:   Well, talk about what you are seeing as the connections right now?
ROSS GELBSPAN:   It's very clear that global warming does not make more hurricanes, but it makes hurricanes much stronger.
And that's because hurricanes take their energy from the temperature of surface waters.
In the case of Katrina, it started as a category one, I think 70 mile-an-hour winds when it glanced off South Florida, but as it moved through the Gulf where surface temperatures are about 80 degrees, it became enormously more powerful.
I think the winds reached about 170 degrees, and that is a big reason for this incredible devastation that we have been seeing.
It's very interesting that also Sir David King, who is Tony Blair's science adviser, made a direct link between hurricane intensity and global warming.
And coincidentally, there was a piece of research done by Dr. Kerry Emmanuel at M.I.T. that came out just a couple of weeks ago that found that tropical storms had become 50% more severe in the last 30 years, again because of rising temperatures.
Has the Age of Chaos Begun?
The genesis of two category-five hurricanes (Katrina and Rita) in a row over the Gulf of Mexico is an unprecedented and troubling occurrence.
But for most tropical meteorologists the truly astonishing "storm of the decade" took place in March 2004.
Hurricane Catarina — so named because it made landfall in the southern Brazilian state of Santa Catarina — was the first recorded south Atlantic hurricane in history.
Textbook orthodoxy had long excluded the possibility of such an event; sea temperatures, experts claimed, were too low and wind shear too powerful to allow tropical depressions to evolve into cyclones south of the Atlantic Equator.
Indeed, forecasters rubbed their eyes in disbelief as weather satellites down-linked the first images of a classical whirling disc with a well-formed eye in these forbidden latitudes.
       Greenhouse gases and heatwaves       
No!   And that's it!
World Bank underwrites the $1.1 billion Metsa-Botnia pulp mill
Finland corporation building polluting mill
Emissions into air:   SO2   NOx   TRs   CO2
       Pollution linked to rainfall and drought       
       Hundreds of Antarctic Glaciers In Retreat, Says Study       
Time is running out

Action on Climate Change Now.

Global youth climate movement.

Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil.

Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation, sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice.

Big Trees as Natural Monuments

Big Trees as Curiosities

Big Trees as Recreation

Big Trees as Cathedrals of Nature

Endangered Big Trees

From Sacred Symbol to Industrial Stumpage

Photo: http://itsgettinghotinhere.org/
Time is running out
Global youth climate movement
Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil
Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation
Sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice
No to the paper-mills
World Bank underwrites the $1.1 billion Metsa-Botnia pulp mill
Finland corporation building polluting mill
Emissions into air:   SO2   NOx   TRs   CO2
Corporations ahead of communities
Earth Day 2005:   "Sleepwalking into an Apocalypse"
Bern Johnson executive director of the U.S. office of the Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide, works with attorneys in 60 countries to protect the environment through law.
He said today: "The damage that we are doing to our global climate is the greatest environmental challenge ever.
Governments are not stepping up to meet this challenge, so we are helping grassroots lawyers around the world find ways to take on climate change."
MECHE LU is an environmental research scientist with the group and recently returned from Chile and Peru, where she assisted local advocates working to protect wild rivers in the Patagonia region of Chile and protect public health near a U.S.-owned smelter in the Peruvian Andes.
She said today: "People all over the world want a voice in protecting their environment.   To have a strong voice, communities need legal and scientific information.   Decisions about the environment are too often made by governments that put the interests of corporations ahead of communities."
Police protecting corporation and elite World Bank money
World Bank underwrites the $1.1 billion Metsa-Botnia pulp mill
Finland corporation building polluting mill
Emissions into air:   SO2   NOx   TRs   CO2
 
Go out Finnish pirates!
World Bank underwrites the $1.1 billion Metsa-Botnia pulp mill
Finland corporation building polluting mill
Emissions into air:   SO2   NOx   TRs   CO2
 
How much of this page is based on false statistics?
How much is real?
Yeah what!

Action on Climate Change Now.

Global youth climate movement.

Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil.

Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation, sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice.

Big Trees as Natural Monuments

Big Trees as Curiosities

Big Trees as Recreation

Big Trees as Cathedrals of Nature

Endangered Big Trees

From Sacred Symbol to Industrial Stumpage

Photo: http://itsgettinghotinhere.org/
Yeah what!
Action on Climate Change Now
Global youth climate movement
Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil
Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation
Sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice

        Destruction of the World’s Seeds — Dr. Vandana Shiva — Globalization       
       Deregulation, Accumulation of wealth       
        — India resistance and corporations       
        — India April 2005 photos         
       Environment - enforced driving bans       
Plant trees and protect Awhitu Regional Park
Friday, 24 June 2005, 5:59 pm
Press Release: Auckland Regional Council

Plant trees and protect Awhitu Regional Park Aucklanders throughout the region are invited to help the Auckland Regional Council (ARC) protect and improve park life by planting native trees on the conservation area at Awhitu Regional Park on Wednesday 29 June and Sunday 3 July from 10am onwards.
Planting days are an excellent opportunity to make a positive difference to the environment. They’re also a great way to experience the region’s parks – this year the ARC is encouraging people to join planting days in parks that they haven’t visited before, and make the most of a rewarding family day out.
Planting at Awhitu will give campers and picnickers shade and shelter. It will also stabilise the coastal edge and protect and enhance the coastal forest remnants.
New trees are planted to maintain and enhance biodiversity, and to protect park life including native plants, birds, fish and insects, and their support systems and food supplies.
Tree planting also goes a long way towards nursing our damaged ecosystems back to health. It speeds up natural regeneration, reduces flooding and erosion, and improves water quality in our rivers and beaches, making them safe for swimming.
What to bring:
Work boots or enclosed shoes (not sandals), a spade (if you have one), gloves, a jacket, snacks and a water bottle (it’s thirsty work)

          Soot's effect on ice melt and glaciers          
          Melting glaciers Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, Himalayas, Kilimanjaro...          
      Loo!   Loo!   Lulu!   Loot! — New Orleans after Katrina        
        Nobel Peace Prize Lecture Wangari Maathai        
        — Tree Planter        
KENYA — 22 February, 2005
Nearly five years ago, the government imposed a ban on logging in order to curb deforestation and to conserve the country's major water catchment areas.
Despite that the Kenyan government says it remains alarmed at the rate at which the country's forest cover is being depleted.
More than 90% of the original national forest cover has now been lost.
Environment Minister Kalonzo Musyoka bluntly warns: "Unless we rapidly improve our forest cover and our management we will face a national disaster."
       World View Of Global Warming       
       An American speaks for the Alaskan wildlife refuge       
How much of this page and my comments based on false statistics?
How much is real?
After Kyoto

Action on Climate Change Now.

Global youth climate movement.

Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil.

Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation, sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice.

Big Trees as Natural Monuments

Big Trees as Curiosities

Big Trees as Recreation

Big Trees as Cathedrals of Nature

Endangered Big Trees

From Sacred Symbol to Industrial Stumpage

Photo: http://itsgettinghotinhere.org/
After Kyoto
Action on Climate Change Now
Global youth climate movement
Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil
Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation
Sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice
Global Warming:
The US Contribution in Figures
  • The United States constitutes 4 per cent of the world population
  • It is responsible for a quarter of all carbon dioxide emissions - an average of 40,000 pounds of carbon dioxide is released by each US citizen every year - the highest of any country in the world, and more than China, India and Japan combined
  • Americans use 50 million tons of paper annually - consuming more than 850 million trees
  • There are more than 200 million cars and light trucks on american roads
  • According to the Federal Department of Transportation, they use over 200 million gallons of petrol a day
  • Motor vehicles account for 56 per cent of all air pollution in The United States
  • A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 2002 concluded that people living in the most heavily polluted metropolitan areas have a 12 per cent increased risk of dying of lung cancer than people in the least polluted areas
  • 32 of the 50 busiest US airports currently have plans to expand operations
  • Every year US industries release at least 2.4 billion pounds of chemicals into the atmosphere
  • Despite having just 2 per cent of known oil reserves, the US consumes 25 per cent of the world's oil production
  • 16 per cent of world oil production goes into american cars alone.
  • Approximately 160 million people living in 32 US states live in regions with smog and soot levels considered dangerous to health
  • The new clear air interstate rule aims to cut sulphur dioxide by 73 per cent and nitrogen oxide by 61 per cent in the next 10 years
  • Around 50 million new cars roll off US assembly lines each year
  • There are already more than 20 million four-wheel-drive vehicles on US roads
  • More than 1.5 million gallons of oil were spilled into US waters in 2000 alone
  • Only 1 per cent of american travel is on public transport, an eighth of that in the UK and an eighteenth of that in Japan
  • As much as 5.99 tons of carbon dioxide is emitted per American per year, compared with 0.31 tons per Indian or 0.05 tons per Bangladeshi.
  • The US had 16 major oil spills between 1976 and 1989, whereas France suffered six and the UK five
  • The average american produces 864kg of municipal waste per year, almost three times the quantity of rubbish produced annually by an Italian
  • http://www.democracynow.org/            September 1st, 2005
    "Katrina's Real Name is Global Warming"
    JUAN GONZALEZ:   How do you respond, obviously, to all of the so-called experts who may say, well, it may — it's true that there's global warming, but how can you pin a particular hurricane's impact or intensity to that general trend?
    It's almost — it seems to me like, well, you may have been exposed to asbestos, but how can you prove that the lung cancer you have came from that exposure?
    ROSS GELBSPAN:   Because we are seeing this increase in intensity all over the place.
    July was, I think, the second hottest July on record, and it triggered a record number of named tropical storms.
    So, Hurricane Katrina fits right into the pattern here of what we're seeing.
    And just to stop for a second, if we look at some other events that have been happening the same year, not necessarily hurricanes, but we had a two-foot snowfall in Los Angeles in January.
    We had 37 inches of rain in one day in Mumbai, India.
    We had this horrendous heat wave with 120 degrees in Arizona.
    We have the Missouri River just about empty because of a prolonged drought.
    All of these, including the intensity of hurricanes, are signatures of the warming of the planet.
    AMY GOODMAN:   I wanted to get your response, Ross Gelbspan, to the latest move of the Bush administration, cutting clean air regulations in this time of massive crisis.  Can you talk about what's happening there?
    ROSS GELBSPAN:   Yeah.  Amy, I think it's best understood if you step back and think that the science — in order to mitigate global warming, the science is very clear.
    We have to cut our emissions worldwide by 70%, and that threatens the survival of the coal and oil industry.
    We need a rapid global transition to clean energy.
    Unfortunately, the White House, under the Bush administration, has become the East Coast branch of ExxonMobil and Peabody Coal.
    And those companies and those industries are really calling all of the shots for climate and energy policy in this White House.
    So, the regulations that you are talking about are very weak, and they're essentially being written by the lobbyists from big oil and big coal.
    And that's really what we're seeing in the bush administration.
    AMY GOODMAN:   Now, in response to what has taken place, the cutting of the restrictions.  They're saying now it's only until September 15, but on clean air regulations, so they say it's to deal with the shortage of oil.
    This is the worst environmental president we’ve had in American history.
    If you look at NRDC’s website you’ll see over 400 major environmental roll backs that are listed there that have been implemented or proposed by this administration over the past four years as part of a deliberate concerted effort to eviscerate 30 years of environmental law.
    It’s a stealth attack.
    The White House has used all kinds of ingenious machinations to try to conceal its radical agenda from the American people including Orwellian rhetoric.
    When they want to destroy the forests, they call it the Healthy Forest Act.
    When they wanted to destroy the air, they called it the Clear Skies Bill.
    But most insidiously, they have put polluters in charge of virtually all the agencies that are supposed to protect Americans from pollution.
          Robert F. Kennedy, Jr      
          Speech delivered at the Sierra Summit 2005      
    ROSS GELBSPAN:   I can understand that, and I'm sympathetic to that.
    The explanation I heard is that different states have different requirements for different kind of mixes of gasoline.
    Some require a component of ethanol and so forth.
    Because of the shortage, because of the damage to the refineries and the rigs, they're saying suspend those regs for another month or two.
    Let us just get whatever gasoline out we can, and then we'll go back to these mandated formulas when we're able to do that.
    So, I'm not unsympathetic to that, if it remains a temporary suspension.
    JUAN GONZALEZ:   And your response to the growing drumbeat in much of the media now of the commercial or corporate media preparing the American public for increased oil prices as a result of the situation in the Gulf right now in the hurricane aftermath?
    ROSS GELBSPAN:   I think that you're seeing some gouging going on.
    I think you are definitely going to see these prices going up.
    This also is taking place against the background of a larger trend toward depletion of oil, and we're passing what's called peek oil globally, which means we’re going to see a very rapid decline in oil supplies.
    So the emphasis may be short term on the increased price of gasoline.
    There should be right now a worldwide effort to move toward clean energy, and the United States stands in very stark contrast to what's happening in Europe.
    As I mentioned, the science says we need to cut emissions by 70%.
    Right now, Holland is cutting her emissions by 80% in 40 years.
    Tony Blair has committed Britain to cut emissions by 60% in 50 years.
    The Germans have committed to 50% cuts in 50 years.
    French President Chirac recently called on the entire industrial world to cut emissions by 75% by the year 2050.
    So, I really think that while we're looking at higher gasoline prices in the short term, we really need to be looking toward an economy based on hybrid cars and hydrogen cars, on electricity that comes from wind and solar and tidal power and so forth.
    We really need to make this transition very rapidly, otherwise we are going to see many more natural disasters and a much more fractured and combative and degraded kind of civilization.
    AMY GOODMAN:   Ross Gelbspan, I wanted to get your response to a piece that Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. wrote: "For They That Sow the Wind Shall Reap the Whirlwind."
    He says:
    “As Hurricane Katrina dismantles Mississippi’s Gulf Coast, it's worth recalling the central role that Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour played in derailing the Kyoto Protocol and kiboshing President Bush’s iron-clad campaign promise to regulate CO2.
    “In March 2001, just two days after EPA administrator Christie Todd Whitman's strong statement affirming Bush's CO2 promise, former RNC Chief Barbour responded with an urgent memo to the White House.
    “Barbour, who had served as RNC Chair and Bush campaign strategist, was now representing the President's major donors from the fossil fuel industry who had enlisted him to map a Bush energy policy that would be friendly to their interest.
    “His credentials insured the new administration's attention.”
    This is the current Mississippi governor, who has flown over the devastated area and is talking about what a massive disaster it is, comparing it to the destruction of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima.
    ROSS GELBSPAN:   Absolutely!  And what Bobby Kennedy wrote is absolutely right, and it's an illustration of what I’m talking about.
    Shortly after he took office, the President reneged on his campaign promise to cut emissions from power plants.
    He then ordered the EPA to remove all references to the damages of global warming from its website.
    Vice President Cheney came out with his energy plan calling for 1,900 new power plants, most of them coal.
    This is the fast track to climate hell.
    And, of course, the President withdrew us from the Kyoto Protocol, so he is really going in the opposite direction from the rest of the world, and he really is following the dictates of the fossil fuel lobby.
    There's no question about it.
    JUAN GONZALEZ:   And what can Americans who are concerned about the lack of attention of our federal government to this issue, what can they do?
    ROSS GELBSPAN:   Unfortunately, it has to be political action.
    It's not lifestyle action.
    Even if we all sat in the dark and rode bicycles, it would not stop global warming, especially given the reliance on coal in India and China and on oil in Mexico and Nigeria and the developing countries.
    We need to take the lead in spearheading a rapid transition to clean energy.
    That will happen only through political pressure, and hopefully through pressure on the United States from a lot of the European countries that are already moving in that direction.
    I would just make a short plug.
    In my book, Boiling Point, that will be out in paperback next month, the last chapter deals with a set of policy strategies that would propel this kind of transition.
    This is not a technology issue.
    We have all these renewable sources right now.
    It’s really a political issue.
    And so, I would urge people to take political action to force this kind of change.
           www.heatisonline.org      
           Kalahari sands stirred by greenhouse gases and heatwaves      
    The thin ozone belt in the stratosphere protects human, animal and plant life from ultraviolet rays sent from sun
    Most UVA, UVB, and UVC rays are converted by contact with the stratosphere ozone belt
    Graphic on the ozone layer.

Ozone layer filters dangerous ultra-violet rays coming from the sun.

Man made pollutants burn a hole in the ozone layer.

CFC and HCFC Halons Methyl bromide used in aerosols, refrigerants, air conditioning, extinguishers, agricultural pesticides.

The U.S. is demanding methyl bromide not be banned despite the fact that the use of methyl bromide in developed countries was supposed to have been completely phased out by Jan. 1, 2005 under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.

Methyl bromide is a highly toxic fumigant pesticide which is injected into soil to sterilise it before planting crops.

It is also used as a post-harvest decontaminate of products and storage areas.

Although it is highly effective in eradicating pests such as nematodes, weeds, insects and rodents, it depletes the ozone layer and poses a danger to human health.

While alternatives exist for more than 93 percent of the applications of methyl bromide, some countries such as the U.S., Japan and Israel claimed that because of regulatory restrictions, availability, cost and local conditions, they had little choice but to continue its use as a pest control.

Picture: AFP/Graphic/Anibal MaizCaceres
    Humans will not be able to step outside without huge special clothing screening all the body if the thin level of stratosphere ozone ceases to renew
    All animal life will die if not kept indoors and never allowed outside
    Most plant life will not be able to grow
    All plants that provide food that humans and animals eat will not be able to grow
    Stratosphere ozone renews from the Sun's rays, provided that the stratosphere warms sufficiently
    Ozone holes are caused by the stratosphere remaining extremely cold
    Increasingly long wave emissions reflecting from Earth are being stopped by global warming chemicals forming a barrier in the troposphere
    One of these chemicals is carbon dioxide CO2
    Stratosphere ozone is also destroyed by chemicals seeping outwards from Earth through the troposphere.
    A major ozone destroying chemical is methyl bromide
     
    Published on Friday, September 21, 2007 by Inter Press Service
    The Chemical That Must Not Be Named
    Delegates from 191 nations are on the verge of an agreement under the Montreal Protocol for faster elimination of ozone-depleting chemicals, but the United States insists it must continue to use the banned pesticide methyl bromide.
    by Stephen Leahy
    Women's college in Patna, India
    ‘It’s a black mark on this meeting.   It is the chemical that must not be named,’ said David Doniger, climate policy director at the Natural Resources Defence Council, a U.S. environmental group.
    'There is a powerful lobby group of strawberry and vegetable growers in Washington,’ Doniger told IPS.
    Methyl bromide is a highly toxic fumigant pesticide which is injected into soil to sterilise it before planting crops.
    It is also used as a post-harvest decontaminate of products and storage areas.
    Although it is highly effective in eradicating pests such as nematodes, weeds, insects and rodents, it depletes the ozone layer and poses a danger to human health.
    While alternatives exist for more than 93 percent of the applications of methyl bromide, some countries such as the U.S., Japan and Israel claimed that because of regulatory restrictions, availability, cost and local conditions, they had little choice but to continue its use as a pest control.
    And so despite the ban, the Montreal Protocol allows ‘critical use exemptions’ for countries to continue to use banned substances for a short period of time until they can find a substitute.
    In 2006, the United States received an exemption to use 8,000 tonnes of methyl bromide, compared to 5,000 tonnes for the rest of the developed world combined.
    At the 19th Meeting of the Parties here in Montreal, the committee reporting on methyl bromide use reported ‘excellent progress’ in the continuing phase-out of the chemical and that not many applications for critical use exemptions had been received.
    The notable exception continues to be the U.S., which has applied for 6,500 tonnes for 2008 and 5,000 tonnes for 2009, even as the rest of the developed world has dropped significantly to just 1,900 and 1,400 tonnes, respectively.
    A NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory image shows the Sun.

The 186-nation treaty that protects Earth from the Sun's dangerous ultraviolet rays fetes its 20th anniversary Sunday, with the US and Europe poised to call for an accelerated timetable for banning ozone-depleting chemicals still in use.

The U.S. is demanding methyl bromide not be banned despite the fact that the use of methyl bromide in developed countries was supposed to have been completely phased out by Jan. 1, 2005 under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.

Methyl bromide is a highly toxic fumigant pesticide which is injected into soil to sterilise it before planting crops.

It is also used as a post-harvest decontaminate of products and storage areas.

Although it is highly effective in eradicating pests such as nematodes, weeds, insects and rodents, it depletes the ozone layer and poses a danger to human health.

While alternatives exist for more than 93 percent of the applications of methyl bromide, some countries such as the U.S., Japan and Israel claimed that because of regulatory restrictions, availability, cost and local conditions, they had little choice but to continue its use as a pest control.

The thin ozone belt in the stratosphere protects human, animal and plant life from ultraviolet rays sent from the sun.

UVA, UVB, and UVC rays if not stopped in their maximum intensity from reaching Earth by stratosphere ozone would mean Humans will not be able to step outside without huge special clothing screening all the body.

All animal life will die if not kept indoors and never allowed outside.

Most plant life will not be able to grow, including all plants that provide food that humans and animals eat. 

Photo: NASA

    A NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory image shows the Sun.
    The 186-nation treaty that protects Earth from the Sun's dangerous ultraviolet rays fetes its 20th anniversary Sunday, with the US and Europe poised to call for an accelerated timetable for banning ozone-depleting chemicals still in use.
    The U.S. is demanding methyl bromide not be banned despite the fact that the use of methyl bromide in developed countries was supposed to have been completely phased out by Jan. 1, 2005 under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.
    Methyl bromide is a highly toxic fumigant pesticide which is injected into soil to sterilise it before planting crops.
    It is also used as a post-harvest decontaminate of products and storage areas.
    Although it is highly effective in eradicating pests such as nematodes, weeds, insects and rodents, it depletes the ozone layer and poses a danger to human health.
    While alternatives exist for more than 93 percent of the applications of methyl bromide, some countries such as the U.S., Japan and Israel claimed that because of regulatory restrictions, availability, cost and local conditions, they had little choice but to continue its use as a pest control.
    The thin ozone belt in the stratosphere protects human, animal and plant life from ultraviolet rays sent from the sun.
    UVA, UVB, and UVC rays if not stopped in their maximum intensity from reaching Earth by stratosphere ozone would mean Humans will not be able to step outside without huge special clothing screening over all the body.
    All animal life will die if not kept indoors and never allowed outside.
    Most plant life will not be able to grow, including all plants that provide food that humans and animals eat.
    Photo: NASA
    The delegate from Switzerland expressed concern that some countries were asking for large amounts and that 40 percent of the stocks were not being used for critical uses.
    The United States maintains a large inventory of methyl bromide in excess of 8,000 tonnes, but the U.S. representative said these would be used up by 2009.
    Emissions of methyl bromide have an immediate impact on the ozone layer, noted Janos Mate of Greenpeace International.
    ‘Scientists think it has three to 10 times the impact of other chemicals,’ Mate told IPS
    The ozone layer will be at its ‘most delicate’ over next few decades before it begins to significantly recover.
    Climate change is slowing this recovery, and the impacts are not fully understood, he said.
    The ozone layer is the part of the atmosphere 25 kilometres up that acts as a shield protecting life on Earth from damaging ultraviolet rays, which can cause sunburns, skin cancer and cataracts.
    The rays can also harm marine life.
    In the past two years, ozone holes larger than Europe have opened over the Antarctic and Southern Ocean.
    Thin ozone belt in the stratosphere protects human, animal and plant life from ultraviolet rays sent from sun
    Most UVA, UVB, and UVC rays are converted by contact with stratosphere ozone belt
    Humans will not be able to step outside without huge special clothing screening all the body
    All animal life will die if not kept indoors and never allowed outside
    Most plant life will not be able to grow
    All plants that provide food that humans and animals eat will not be able to grow
    Canisters of Methyl Bromide

The 186-nation treaty that protects Earth from the Sun's dangerous ultraviolet rays fetes its 20th anniversary Sunday, with the US and Europe poised to call for an accelerated timetable for banning ozone-depleting chemicals still in use.

The U.S. is demanding methyl bromide not be banned despite the fact that the use of methyl bromide in developed countries was supposed to have been completely phased out by Jan. 1, 2005 under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.

Methyl bromide is a highly toxic fumigant pesticide which is injected into soil to sterilise it before planting crops.

It is also used as a post-harvest decontaminate of products and storage areas.

Although it is highly effective in eradicating pests such as nematodes, weeds, insects and rodents, it depletes the ozone layer and poses a danger to human health.

While alternatives exist for more than 93 percent of the applications of methyl bromide, some countries such as the U.S., Japan and Israel claimed that because of regulatory restrictions, availability, cost and local conditions, they had little choice but to continue its use as a pest control.

The thin ozone belt in the stratosphere protects human, animal and plant life from ultraviolet rays sent from the sun.

UVA, UVB, and UVC rays if not stopped in their maximum intensity from reaching Earth by stratosphere ozone would mean Humans will not be able to step outside without huge special clothing screening all the body.

All animal life will die if not kept indoors and never allowed outside.

Most plant life will not be able to grow, including all plants that provide food that humans and animals eat.

    Canisters of Methyl Bromide.
    The 186-nation treaty that protects Earth from the Sun's dangerous ultraviolet rays fetes its 20th anniversary Sunday, with the US and Europe poised to call for an accelerated timetable for banning ozone-depleting chemicals still in use.
    The U.S. is demanding methyl bromide not be banned despite the fact that the use of methyl bromide in developed countries was supposed to have been completely phased out by Jan. 1, 2005 under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.
    Methyl bromide is a highly toxic fumigant pesticide which is injected into soil to sterilise it before planting crops.
    It is also used as a post-harvest decontaminate of products and storage areas.
    Although it is highly effective in eradicating pests such as nematodes, weeds, insects and rodents, it depletes the ozone layer and poses a danger to human health.
    While alternatives exist for more than 93 percent of the applications of methyl bromide, some countries such as the U.S., Japan and Israel claimed that because of regulatory restrictions, availability, cost and local conditions, they had little choice but to continue its use as a pest control.
    The thin ozone belt in the stratosphere protects human, animal and plant life from ultraviolet rays sent from the sun.
    UVA, UVB, and UVC rays if not stopped in their maximum intensity from reaching Earth by stratosphere ozone would mean Humans will not be able to step outside without huge special clothing screening over all the body.
    All animal life will die if not kept indoors and never allowed outside.
    Most plant life will not be able to grow, including all plants that provide food that humans and animals eat.
    The World Metrological Organisation reported this week that the hole is back and bigger than ever.
    And it could grow larger as spring returns to the southern hemisphere.
    Climate change appears to playing a role in the formation of these holes.
    Paradoxically, as the Earth warms at the surface, in the polar regions the upper atmosphere is getting colder, creating just the right conditions for chemicals like chlorine and bromine to destroy ozone.
    Last year, researchers at the University of Colorado at Boulder discovered that winds circling high above the far northern hemisphere have a much greater impact on upper stratospheric ozone levels than previously thought.
    Those winds appear to be increasing with climate change, translating into less ozone in the upper stratosphere.
    Meantime, the U.S. growers lobby group is upset that the U.S. delegation isn’t pushing for higher volumes of methyl bromide, claiming that they could get far higher amounts under the Protocol’s rules because economically viable alternatives are not yet available.
    ‘It’s time to inject some common sense into this process,’ said Charles Hall of the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association in a statement.
    U.S. growers have never understood that methyl bromide is destroying the ozone layer, said Doniger.
    Italy, Greece and Spain have nearly eliminated their use in agriculture, he added.
    ‘We’re all suffering with a thinner ozone layer just to benefit a few U.S. companies,’ said Mate.
    © 2007 IPS - Inter Press Service
    Ozone around the world, September 23, 2007

Photo: NASA
    Ozone around the world, October 1, 2009

Photo: NASA
    How much of this page and my comments based on false statistics?
    How much is real?
    The ozone hole as seen over the Antarctic is caused by a lack of ozone in the stratosphere over the Antarctic area
    The lack of ozone in the stratosphere over the Antarctic is caused by the temperature over the Antarctic becoming very low
    Graphic on the ozone layer.

Ozone layer filters dangerous ultra-violet rays coming from the sun.

Man made pollutants burn a hole in the ozone layer.

CFC and HCFC Halons Methyl bromide used in aerosols, refrigerants, air conditioning, extinguishers, agricultural pesticides.

The U.S. is demanding methyl bromide not be banned despite the fact that the use of methyl bromide in developed countries was supposed to have been completely phased out by Jan. 1, 2005 under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.

Methyl bromide is a highly toxic fumigant pesticide which is injected into soil to sterilise it before planting crops.

It is also used as a post-harvest decontaminate of products and storage areas.

Although it is highly effective in eradicating pests such as nematodes, weeds, insects and rodents, it depletes the ozone layer and poses a danger to human health.

While alternatives exist for more than 93 percent of the applications of methyl bromide, some countries such as the U.S., Japan and Israel claimed that because of regulatory restrictions, availability, cost and local conditions, they had little choice but to continue its use as a pest control.

Picture: AFP/Graphic/Anibal MaizCaceres
    Normal low Austral winter temperatures are intensified by heat waves being prevented from reaching the stratosphere from Earth by global warming chemicals in the troposphere.
    This causes extreme low temperatures in the stratosphere over the Antarctic
    The lack of ozone over the Antarctic is also due to the thin band of ozone in the stratosphere not replenishing sufficiently due to ozone destroying chemicals seeping from Earth.
    The thin ozone belt in the stratosphere protects human, animal and plant life from ultraviolet rays sent from sun
    Most UVA, UVB, and UVC rays are converted by contact with the stratosphere ozone belt
    Humans will not be able to step outside without huge special clothing screening all the body if the thin level of stratosphere ozone ceases to renew
    All animal life will die if not kept indoors and never allowed outside
    Most plant life will not be able to grow
    All plants that provide food that humans and animals eat will not be able to grow
    Wildebeests walk to a pond at dusk in Amboseli national park, 188 miles southeast of Nairobi, Kenya, August 29, 2007.

Africa is already suffering from the world failing to reduce global warming, with parts of the impoverished continent becoming uncultivable and uninhabitable.

The 186-nation treaty that protects Earth from the Sun's dangerous ultraviolet rays fetes its 20th anniversary Sunday, with the US and Europe poised to call for an accelerated timetable for banning ozone-depleting chemicals still in use.

The U.S. is demanding methyl bromide not be banned despite the fact that the use of methyl bromide in developed countries was supposed to have been completely phased out by Jan. 1, 2005 under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.

Methyl bromide is a highly toxic fumigant pesticide which is injected into soil to sterilise it before planting crops.

It is also used as a post-harvest decontaminate of products and storage areas.

Although it is highly effective in eradicating pests such as nematodes, weeds, insects and rodents, it depletes the ozone layer and poses a danger to human health.

While alternatives exist for more than 93 percent of the applications of methyl bromide, some countries such as the U.S., Japan and Israel claimed that because of regulatory restrictions, availability, cost and local conditions, they had little choice but to continue its use as a pest control.

The thin ozone belt in the stratosphere protects human, animal and plant life from ultraviolet rays sent from the sun.

UVA, UVB, and UVC rays if not stopped in their maximum intensity from reaching Earth by stratosphere ozone would mean Humans will not be able to step outside without huge special clothing screening all the body.

All animal life will die if not kept indoors and never allowed outside.

Most plant life will not be able to grow, including all plants that provide food that humans and animals eat. 

Photo: Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

                      slide cursor here

    Wildebeests walk to a pond at dusk in Amboseli national park, 188 miles southeast of Nairobi, Kenya, August 29, 2007.
    Africa is already suffering from the world failing to reduce global warming, with parts of the impoverished continent becoming uncultivable and uninhabitable.
    The 186-nation treaty that protects Earth from the Sun's dangerous ultraviolet rays fetes its 20th anniversary Sunday, with the US and Europe poised to call for an accelerated timetable for banning ozone-depleting chemicals still in use.
    The U.S. is demanding methyl bromide not be banned despite the fact that the use of methyl bromide in developed countries was supposed to have been completely phased out by Jan. 1, 2005 under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.
    Methyl bromide is a highly toxic fumigant pesticide which is injected into soil to sterilise it before planting crops.
    It is also used as a post-harvest decontaminate of products and storage areas.
    Although it is highly effective in eradicating pests such as nematodes, weeds, insects and rodents, it depletes the ozone layer and poses a danger to human health.
    While alternatives exist for more than 93 percent of the applications of methyl bromide, some countries such as the U.S., Japan and Israel claimed that because of regulatory restrictions, availability, cost and local conditions, they had little choice but to continue its use as a pest control.
    The thin ozone belt in the stratosphere protects human, animal and plant life from ultraviolet rays sent from the sun.
    UVA, UVB, and UVC rays if not stopped in their maximum intensity from reaching Earth by stratosphere ozone would mean Humans will not be able to step outside without huge special clothing screening over all the body.
    All animal life will die if not kept indoors and never allowed outside.
    Most plant life will not be able to grow, including all plants that provide food that humans and animals eat.
    Photo: Goran Tomasevic/Reuters
    Stratosphere ozone renews from the Sun's rays, provided that the stratosphere warms sufficiently
    Ozone holes are caused by the stratosphere remaining extremely cold
    Increasingly long wave emissions reflecting from Earth are being stopped by global warming chemicals forming a barrier in the troposphere
    One of these chemicals is carbon dioxide CO2
    Stratosphere ozone is also destroyed by chemicals seeping outwards from Earth through the troposphere.
    A major ozone destroying chemical is methyl bromide
    When the last tree is cut down,

the last river poisoned,

the last fish caught,

then only will man discover,

That he can not eat money

Image: bellaciao.org
    NATO's silent toxic air-spraying planes
    HAARP
    Weather Warfare
    Full Spectrum Dominance
    Elana Freeland on Buzzsaw with Sean Stone
    Download audio mp3 from thewe.cc server      right click here
    Chemtrails HAARP and the full spectrum dominance of planet earth.

Image: internet
    Climate engineering weather warfare collapse of civilization

Image: internet
    “I had a Sunday dinner a few weeks ago at the house of my dad’s and stepmom’s neighbors.
    The man and woman of the house are in their 60’s and both proud liberals.
    The man said he was a ‘Berkley liberal.’ He supports Hillary, she supports Bernie Sanders.
    Towards the end of the dinner he expressed the opinion that a few nuke bombs on some of the major cities in Iraq would be a good idea.
    Previous to that, he defended the dropping of nuke bombs on Japan.
    The guy’s wife, the Bernie supporter, added something about the barbarous tribal nature of Iraqi society.
    She quoted Deepak Chopra on the [evil] nature of Mohamed.
    Their son is a fighter pilot who is thinking about joining the top gun program.
    He is gay but is too scared to come out to his work colleagues.”
    Bi-Polar Disorder: Obama’s Bait-and-Switch Environmental Politics — click here
    P.S. from Kewe to the above article written by Paul Street.
    I accept the sun is a much greater factor in global weather than human-made activity.
    That it is possible climate change will become a bigger problem but also more probable the sun is presently taking us into a mini-cold period.
    That the increase in human-made carbon dioxide combined in the stratosphere with other Earth-releasing-of-warmth blocking chemicals is causing a wave of new tree/plant growth in areas not seen for many millennium.
    That seeding of the clouds being done by NATO with its toxic compounds is completely destructive to the soil, seas and inland waters beneath, and many vulnerable humans and varied life, and that the politicians responsible for this NATO destructive activity should be held accountable for such as being enemies of Earth's eco-structure and livability.
    From the video 'Holes in Heaven' — Brooks Agnew, Earth Tornographer
    In 1983 I did radio tornography with 30 watts looking for oil in the ground.
    I found 26 oil wells over a nine state area.
    100 hundred percent of the time was accurate, which is just 30 watts of power beaming straight into solid rock.
    HAARP uses a billion watts beamed straight into the ionosphere for experiments.
    Picture these strings on the piano as layers of the Earth, each one has its own frequency.
    What we used to do is beam radio waves into the ground and it would vibrate any 'strings' that were present in the ground.
    We might get a sound back like ___ and we would say, that's natural gas.
    We might get a sound back like ____ and we'd say that's crude oil.
    We were able to identify each frequency.
    We accomplished this with just 30 watts of radio power.
    If you do this with a billion watts the vibrations are so violent that the entire piano would shake.
    In fact the whole house would shake.
    In fact the vibrations could be so severe under ground they could even cause an earthquake.
    Download or watch movie on HAARP — Advanced US Military research weapon on behaviour modification
    weather change, ionesphere manipulation — click here
    Download or watch audio of Dr. Nick Begich talking on HAARP
    — The 2006 update to 'Angels Don't Play This HAARP'.
    'Angels Still Don't Play This HAARP: Advances In Tesla Technology'.
    Planet Earth Weapon by Rosalie Bertell
    ozone, HAARP, chemtrails, space war — click here
    What HAARP Is.. And Everything Its Used For
    Full HAARP Documentary — click here
    Angels Dont Play This HAARP weather manipulation
    1 hour 36 minutes video — click here
    (poor quality to watch but well worth listening)
    Dr. Nick Begich, his book and his articles can be found here
           http://www.earthpulse.com/      
    Article on Chemtrails — unusual cloud formations in the US.
            Araucaria Forest      
    http://bellaciao.org/     October 28, 2004
    GENEVA — Humanity’s reliance on fossil fuels, the spread of cities, the destruction of natural habitats for farmland and over-exploitation of the oceans are destroying Earth’s ability to sustain life, the environmental group WWF warned in a new report Thursday.
    The biggest consumers of nonrenewable natural resources are the United Arab Emirates, the United States, Kuwait, Australia and Sweden, who leave the biggest "ecological footprint," the World Wildlife Fund said in its regular Living Planet Report.
    Humans currently consume 20 percent more natural resources than the Earth can produce, the report said.
    "We are spending nature’s capital faster than it can regenerate," said WWF chief Claude Martin, releasing the 40-page study.
    Use of fossil fuels such as coal, gas and oil increased by almost 700 percent between 1961 and 2001, the study said.
    The planet is unable to keep pace and absorb the emissions, WWF said.
     
           For Toms, Arctic and Antarctic information, and how ozone is produced      
           click here:  More on Ozone      
           Arctic, Antarctic and Kalaallit Nunaat (Greenland)      
           High-resolution polar ice and sea ice elevation      
           Satellite begins earth checkup      
           Ice sheet reveal ancient plant matter      
           Satellite shows dramatic Aral Sea loss      
           Deforestation most pressing concern      
           One-third of amphibian species threatened      
           Hens Liberated      
    Bangladesh — unprecedented flooding
    End to the tax-free status of aviation fuel
    The rise in demand for air travel is one of the most serious environmental threats facing the world, a study says.
    The University of York U.K. report says government plans for airport expansion are in direct conflict with targets to reduce greenhouse gases.
    Report authors Professor John Whitelegg and Howard Cambridge say polluting gases from aircraft exhaust fumes are on the increase.
    Airlines should pay an environmental charge equal to the damage, they say.
    The UK and other EU governments have made a massive commitment to expanding aviation, the report says.
    It sets out a model for dealing with aviation over the next 30 years, recommending steps to be taken by the UK and other EU countries including an end to the tax-free status of aviation fuel.
    The report says at least 50% of visitors should access airports by public transport, and wants journeys of less than 400 miles to be undertaken by train rather than plane, eliminating 45% of flights.
    Prof Whitelegg told the BBC that high-speed rail services such as Eurostar needed to be improved so that every city in the UK was linked.
    He said: "We could have a really high quality railway system that gives people a real alternative.
    "At the moment we have cheap flights and some of the most expensive railways in the world.
    That is the wrong way around."
    The report says businesses should be encouraged to use technology such as video conferencing as an alternative to travel.
    Governments should carry out the Zurich airport "bubble concept", limiting emissions of all kinds from airports and treating them like large industrial sites, the report says.
    Prof Whitelegg said air travel growth had been "fuelled by generous tax breaks and state aid, and is contrary to the objectives of environmental policy, especially efforts to prevent the worst consequences of climate change".
    He told the BBC an environmental tax on flying was needed to reflect the "environmental realities".
    He said governments were moving towards implementing such a tax, which could be as much as £40 or £50 per flight.
    "This will ultimately be paid by the person who is flying or the person who is bringing in lettuces from Africa," he said.
    The University of York's Stockholm Institute published the report.
           Why did you cut down the trees Grandma?       
           State of the World's Garden       
    Asia water crisis — tables being drained for farming
    Ford destroy environment cars
    Pollution linked to rainfall and drought
    Pollution linked to huge increases in brain disease
    Man made grotesque calamity        
    Earth hits 2,000 year warming peak
    www.democracynow.org     Amy Goodman, David Helvarg
    AMY GOODMAN:  Can you explain again the mechanism for how coastal sprawl is being driven?
    DAVID HELVARG:   Yes. We have since 1968, a federal flood insurance program that's below market rate that essentially until the federal government got into the business of insuring ocean-front properties, banks were not willing to provide mortgages to build in places like Captiva and Sanibel — which are these very upscale barrier islands that also got struck.
    I bet a lot of the federal money will be going not to the trailer courts but to these very upscale — Barrier islands are kinda like geology on amphetamines.
    They're made to move.
    Nobody would build there until the federal flood insurance came along.
    And the banks, once these constructions sites were insured for flooding, the banks then provided the mortgages and the developers went wild.
    So at this point it's grown to potentially our largest exposure after our Social Security.
    Like I say, the U.S. government insures $673 billion of property and much of it is in flood planes and in areas of high erosion due to sea-level rise.
    Both the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy and the Pew Oceans Commission, two major commissions that just reported on the state of America's blue frontier, both recommended reforming the flood control system.
    Not to allow it to encourage new growth in high risk areas.
    Interestingly, three governors, commented on the Ocean Policy Commission.
    At least three republican governors from Maryland, Massachusetts and South Carolina said we need to reduce the incentives for development in these high risk areas.
    Jeb Bush was not one of the governors who called for reforming the act.
    He's much more responsive to the Florida real estate interests.
    So what he does, he goes into this flood zone the other day and says, come on back to Punta Gorda a year from now, the tourism and the place will be even more beautiful, basically arguing that we should rebuild in harm's way because it's — I think it's, you know, what the real estate industry is driving him to do.
    We already have a 25-year cycle of intensified hurricanes that takes place in the north Atlantic. You add climate impacts on top of that, increased sea level rise, erosion, intensified wind shear, 5 to 10%.
    You see, you know, that there's a reason that it looks now like eight out of the last ten hurricane seasons will be above average.
    And of course, the irony is that the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which is bringing in relief is sort of generating business for itself.
    Because it's got 673 billion dollars of flood insured properties out there, and about half of that money is in Florida.
    And none of that flood insurance takes into account rising sea levels, intensified hurricanes, the other impacts of global warming.
    In fact, it's a driver of putting people in harm's way, and 17 of our 20 fastest growing counties are now coastal.
    This encouragement of coastal sprawl that both degrades our marine environments puts millions of people in harm's way.
    Had Charley stayed on track and hit the Tampa-St. Pete area, this probably would have been one of those $50 billion to $100 billion city buster storms that the climatologists I talked to are all projecting at this point.
            U.N. Says 2003 3rd Hottest Year on Record        
             — the rhythm of temperature increases is accelerating.
            Arctic temperatures warming at incredible rate        
            Sustainable Amazon        
            United Nations report says large areas of planet drying up        

            Dramatic melt in Arctic icecap        
            Abrupt climate event — Pentagon study        
            Inceased biomass helps clean carbon dioxide from the air.        
            Environment havoc in 2003 cost $60,000,000,000.00        
            Australia poisoning land        
            Europe's energy use still rising        
            Rising sea temperature killing Great Barrier Reef        
    www.democracynow.org     Amy Goodman, George Monbiot
    AMY GOODMAN:  David Helvarg, author of Diagnosis Blue Frontier: Saving America's Living Seas, also author of The War Against the Greens.   We're also joined by George Monbiot, author and columnist for The London Guardian.
    He was in our studio recently talking about his book, Manifesto for a New World Order.   You speak a lot about extreme weather, in fact, I remember a year ago when we were experiencing the blackout here in New York, we talked to you about extreme weather.
    Can you talk about your view from across the Atlantic of what's taking place?
    GEORGE MONBIOT:   Yeah, Amy, I noticed that too.
    It's not possible, Amy, to say that this is definitely the result of global warming, because what we we're looking at is a whole pattern of climate which is very likely to trigger off all sorts of freak weather events.
    But we can't say that any particular weather event is the result of climate change.
    What we can say is that it's precisely this kind of event which the people have been warning against climate change have been warning about.
    They have been saying that if there is warming, global warming we are going to see a lot more storms and there will be a lot more violent when they occur.
    Now, of course, this is caused enormous grief and upset and damage to people in the United States but at the same time as that's been going on, there's been some far graver things happening in other parts of the world.
    We have seen enormous damage caused by floods in Bangladesh, with many, many thousands of people pushed out of their homes by those floods and a great deal of disease caused and malnutrition caused by them at the same time.
    Far more seriously still, we are currently see the world's glaciers going into retreat at a very great rate and this includes the glaciers in the Himalayan mountains.
    These are the glaciers which feed all of the great rivers of Asia.
    Whether it's the Yangtze or the Mekong or the Brahmaputra or Ganges or the Indus.
    These are the rivers which support the irrigation agriculture, which produces the great majority of the food which people in most parts of Asia eat.
    And if those rivers run dry, because the glaciers melt.
    As indeed they are melting very rapidly.
    Then that irrigation agriculture is no longer going to be possible.
    Not just for the region, but the entire world goes into net food deficit.
    The result of that is a catastrophe of unimaginable proportions.
            Argument for instant action is undeniable        
            Mexican farmer wins environmental prize        
            Camisea Project        
            Mekong and the damming of the river in China        

            Fastest area of glacial retreat        
            Nine of ten warmest years        
    How much of this page is based on false statistics?
    How much is real?
    Can't beat Em, Eat Em!

Action on Climate Change Now.

Global youth climate movement.

Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil.

Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation, sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice.

Big Trees as Natural Monuments

Big Trees as Curiosities

Big Trees as Recreation

Big Trees as Cathedrals of Nature

Endangered Big Trees

From Sacred Symbol to Industrial Stumpage

Photo: http://itsgettinghotinhere.org/
    Can't beat Em, Eat Em!
    Action on Climate Change Now
    Global youth climate movement
    Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil
    Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation
    Sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice
    www.democracynow.org     Amy Goodman, George Monbiot
    AMY GOODMAN:  Is there more attention on the issue of global warming and extreme climate in Europe and Britain than there is here in the United States?
    GEORGE MONBIOT:   Yes, there is.   For a couple of reasons.
    For a start, we have a little more diversity in the media.
    I mean, in the United States, of course, you have some fantastic media.   I'm talking to one of them.   But you will also have in the mainstream media a much more effectively controlled system where in Britain there's more diversity within the mainstream media and so there's more scope to discuss these things.
    We're also very aware of what happened last summer in Europe where 20,000 people died as a result of extreme heat and it was an extraordinary situation.
    I mean, the temperatures went way beyond all previous records.
    Right across most of Europe.
    That — that again, seems to be entirely in line with the predictions made by climatologists.
    Yet at the same time in Britain, and in Europe, we have this level of awareness, but at the same time people desperately want to believe what this handful of so-called climate skeptics are saying.
    They are saying, don't worry about it, it's all cause by cosmic rays or sun spots or whatever other excuse they might come up with this week, and these people have as much credibility among climatologists as the people who say there's no connection between smoking and lung cancer, have among doctors.
    In other words, they have zero, almost zero scientific credibility.
    And yet, we listen to them and we listen to them because to — to accept what the great majority of climate scientists are saying, to accept what almost certainly seems to be happening around the world is to accept something which is extremely scary and we just don't want to go down that road.
            Zeroing in on climate change        
            Melting glaciers threaten Peru        
            90 percent of cod stock in Atlantic has collapsed        
            Denver new dirtier skies        

            80 percent of coral caribbean reefs destroyed.htm        
            Clock ticking for Indonesian rainforest        
            Tree top protest over Tasmania        
            Prehistoric man began global warming        
            Wetlands cleared and ploughed        
            Destruction of Great Barrier Reef's coral cost Australian economy A$8 billion        
    Clean energy can't wait

Cal State Go Solar.

Global youth climate movement.

Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil.

Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation, sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice.

Big Trees as Natural Monuments

Big Trees as Curiosities

Big Trees as Recreation

Big Trees as Cathedrals of Nature

Endangered Big Trees

From Sacred Symbol to Industrial Stumpage

Photo: http://itsgettinghotinhere.org/
    Clean energy can't wait
    Cal State Go Solar
    Global youth climate movement
    Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil
    Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation
    Sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice
    I don’t know of an issue of a greater magnitude than the energy issue that humanity’s facing right now.
    Oh my God, we’re having wars in, you know, Asia, killing millions of people over the hydrocarbons.
    The issue is so multi-faceted, it’s so immense, that... Oh yes, this is being very carefully managed.
    www.democracynow.org     Amy Goodman, David Helvarg
    AMY GOODMAN:  David Helvarg, final comment?
    DAVID HELVARG:   Yeah. It is ironic that last summer when you have historic heat wave and flooding in Europe, most Europeans recognize it as climate change.
    When we have historic drought and forest fires in the west, they blame environmentalists.
    I think that, the fact that, our President, his dad, his vice President, Secretary of Commerce and National Security Adviser are all veterans of the oil industry, y'know, if your major campaign contributors are oil and gas industry, you're not likely to admit that they're also the major contributors to climate change and that we need a rapid and immediate transition to new non-carbon energy technologies.
    That's probably the — I have been and covered climate change in Antarctica, Australia, Fiji, New Jersey and Florida.
    We're in the footprint.
    We're in the process of going through some very scary changes as he [GEORGE MONBIOT] said.
    And probably the first step in remediating that would be a regime change here at home.
            Angry flood victims look to place blame        
            Growing evidence global climate change will effect health and wellbeing around the world        
            India's coastal cities, Mumbai, Chennai and Kolkata could sink beneath the sea        
            Bush approves $400bn ($400,000,000,000.00,) defence bill        
            Dying for clean water        
            White house to end power plant probes        
            Lights out        
            Wildlife experts warn against serious GM damage        
            Alternative car Apollondine travels 4,000km from Perth to Sydney        
            EPA report to hide dangers        
            Stopping mercury emissions profoundly effects food chain        
            Songbird thought extinct, still flies in Fiji Mountains        
            Ocean census discovers new fish        
            Europe heatwave brought record levels of ozone        
            Norway extends Arctic zone        
            President Bush is abandoning a plan that could have further reduced wetlands protection        
            Cancun, Mexico — the island is naked, its forests long gone        
            The real Cancun        
            Albatrosses to benefit from pact        

            Camisea Natural Gas Project        
            Classified spending on the rise        
            George Bush compiling worst environmental record of any president        
            Greenpeace appalled at giant coal mine approval        
            Don't sell Middle Earth        

            Paw prints disappearing for Siberia's Amur tiger        
            New species uncovered        
            Purple frog delights scientists        
            Animal health        
     
    National Geographic     August 2004
    Carbon Dioxide being absorbed by oceans
    Around half of all carbon dioxide produced by humans since the industrial revolution has dissolved into the world's oceans—with adverse effects for marine life—according to two new studies.
    Scientists who undertook the first comprehensive look at ocean storage of carbon dioxide found that the world's oceans serve as a massive sink that traps the greenhouse gas.
    The researchers say the oceans' removal of the carbon dioxide from Earth's atmosphere has slowed global warming.
    But in a second, related study, scientists say the sink effect is now changing ocean chemistry.
    The resulting change has slowed growth of plankton, corals, and other invertebrates that serve as the most basic level of the ocean food chain.
    The impacts on marine life could be severe, scientists say.
    "The oceans are performing a great service to humankind by removing this carbon dioxide from the atmosphere," said Christopher Sabine, a geophysicist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Seattle, Washington.
    "The problem is that this service has potential consequences for the biology and ecosystem structure of the oceans."
    Sabine is a co-author of both studies, which are described in tomorrow's edition of the research journal
    A greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide traps solar heat in Earth's atmosphere.
    The gas is known as the biggest contributor to global warming of the planet.
    Since mass consumption of fossil fuels began with the industrial revolution around 1800, the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has grown from an estimated 280 parts per million to around 380 parts per million.
    Today's current level of atmospheric carbon dioxide is only around half of what scientists have predicted atmospheric levels should be, based on estimates that humans have contributed 244 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide to Earth's atmosphere.
    "The other half of the emitted carbon dioxide was the so-called missing sink, which was thought to be taken up by either the oceans or the land plants," Sabine said. (Plants absorb carbon dioxide and use it to produce energy.)
    Scientists have long suspected that the oceans serve as a major sink, or storehouse, of carbon dioxide. Past estimates of precisely how carbon dioxide was accumulating in the world's oceans were based on computer models or other indirect methods.
    In the new study, however, researchers collected direct samples on dissolved carbon dioxide levels in oceans around the world throughout the 1990s.
    Data were collected at some 9,600 sites around the world on 95 separate research voyages.
    The effort was led by two international collaborations: the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) and the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS).
    Using the data, Sabine and researchers from the United States, Europe, Australia, South Korea, Japan, and other nations have now completed the most comprehensive survey of ocean carbon chemistry.
    Their results suggest that the oceans have taken up 48 percent of all carbon dioxide emitted from fossil fuel burning and cement manufacture (a major source of the gas) between 1800 and 1994.
            Fire rages in Zimbabwe park        
            New dams bring more Piranha attacks        
            Kazakh's to save north Aral sea        
            Ike was right, but don't tell        
            Monkeys face sterilisation        
            Closest living relatives on brink of extinction        

            More than 700 threatened species remain unprotected        
            Newly found bird loses only known habitat        
            Lethal virus ignites debate        
            Where your income tax money really goes        
            California, $601 million cut from higher education.        
            Pays $7.6 billion for war.        
    National Geographic     August 2004
    Carbon dioxide absorbed by oceans
    In the second, related study, scientists found that while the oceans are helping to mitigate global warming, the dissolved carbon dioxide is already having a detrimental effect on marine life.
    Richard Feely, a marine chemist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, is the study's lead author.
    Feely said, "Because carbon dioxide is an acid gas, the surface ocean pH is dropping" (pH is a measure of acidity in solutions).
    If predictions made by Feely's team are right, the surface of oceans—where most marine life is found—could soon become more acidic than they have been in five million years.
    This increase in acidity makes it difficult for shell-forming animals and some algae to amass carbonate ions from the seawater to form their calcium carbonate shells.
    Corals, some types of mollusk, and tiny planktonic organisms called foraminifers and coccolithophorids could all be affected.
    Many of these species form key l in the marine food chain.
            A Fatal Stand Against WTO        

            An Uzbek specialist crosses a rat with a muskrat        
            ‘An adolecent's dash to freedom’        
            The joy of toxic cola        
            Why has free trade gone so wrong        
    PARIS (AFP)    July 21, 2004
    Rogue waves
    "Rogue waves" have been the anecdotal cause behind scores of sinkings of vessels as large as container ships and supertankers over the past two decades.
    But evidence to support this has been sketchy, and many marine scientists have clung to statistical models that say monstrous deviations from the normal sea state only occur once every thousand years.
    Testing this promise, ESA tasked two of its Earth-scanning satellites, ERS-1 and ERS-2, to monitor the oceans with their radar.
    The radars send back "imagettes" — a picture of the sea surface in a rectangle measuring 10 by five kilometers (six by 2.5 miles) that is taken every 200 kms (120 miles).
    Around 30,000 separate "imagettes" were taken by the two satellites in a three-week project, MaxWave, that was carried out in 2001.
    Even though the research period was brief, the satellites identified more than 10 individual giant waves around the globe that measured more than 25 metres (81.25 feet) in height, ESA said in a press release.
    The waves exist "in higher numbers than anyone expected," said Wolfgang Rosenthal, senior scientist with the GKSS Research Centre in Geesthacht, Germany, who pored over the data.
    "The next step is to analyse if they can be forecasted," he said.
    Ironically, the research coincided with two "rogue wave" incidents in which two tourist cruisers, the Bremen and the Caledonian Star, had their bridge windows smashed by 30-metre (100-feet) monsters in the South Atlantic.
    The Bremen was left drifting without navigation or propulsion for two hours after the hit.
    In 1995, the British cruise liner Queen Elizabeth II encountered a 29-metre (94.25-feet) wall of water during a hurricane in the North Atlantic.
    Its captain, Ronald Warwick, likened it to "the White Cliffs of Dover."
    In the next phase of research, a project called Wave Atlas will use two years of "imagettes" to create a worldwide atlas of rogue wave events and carry out statistical analyses, ESA said.
    The goal is to find out how these strange, cataclysmic phenomena may be generated by ocean eddies and currents or by the collision of weather fronts, and which regions of the seas may be most at risk.
    Finding out could help ship architects and the designers of oil rigs and their operators to skirt the menace.
            Plays Titanic during rogue wave        
            GM crops - No Thanks!        
            Global warming choking life out of Lake Tanganyika        
            Hundreds of slaves freed in Brazil        
            British Scientist Puts Odds for Apocalypse at 50-50        
            World’s wettest area dries up        
            Water war leaves Palestinians thirsty        
            US ready to wreck ozone layer treaty        
            A Higher Power Informs the Republican Assault on the Environment        
            Tracking Toxics        
            Queensland tree clearing controls        
            Rapidly dwindling water resource threat to country        
            Rare tortoises escape hand luggage hell        

    How much of this page is based on false statistics?
    How much is real?
    Renewable energy carrie pins.

Global youth climate movement.

Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil.

Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation, sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice.

Big Trees as Natural Monuments

Big Trees as Curiosities

Big Trees as Recreation

Big Trees as Cathedrals of Nature

Endangered Big Trees

From Sacred Symbol to Industrial Stumpage

Photo: http://itsgettinghotinhere.org/
    Renewable energy carrie pins
    Global youth climate movement
    Tackling the climate crisis, our addiction to oil
    Energy conservation, cleaner electricity purchasing, more renewable energy generation
    Sustainable transportation systems and environmental justice
    Monday, 13 December, 2004
    Pollution: A life and death issue
    Adam Brookes
    By Alex Kirby
    BBC News website environment correspondent
    cyclist in the smog, AP
    WHO says 3m people a year are killed by outdoor air pollution
    One of the main themes of Planet Under Pressure is the way many of the Earth's environmental crises reinforce one another.
    Pollution is an obvious example — we do not have the option of growing food, or finding enough water, on a squeaky-clean planet, but on one increasingly tarnished and trashed by the way we have used it so far.
    Cutting waste and clearing up pollution costs money. Yet time and again it is the quest for wealth that generates much of the mess in the first place.
    Living in a way that is less damaging to the Earth is not easy, but it is vital, because pollution is pervasive and often life-threatening.
  • Air: The World Health Organization (WHO) says 3 million people are killed worldwide by outdoor air pollution annually from vehicles and industrial emissions, and 1.6 million indoors through using solid fuel. Most are in poor countries.
  • Water: Diseases carried in water are responsible for 80% of illnesses and deaths in developing countries, killing a child every eight seconds. Each year 2.1 million people die from diarrhoeal diseases associated with poor water.
  • Soil: Contaminated land is a problem in industrialised countries, where former factories and power stations can leave waste like heavy metals in the soil. It can also occur in developing countries, sometimes used for dumping pesticides. Agriculture can pollute land with pesticides, nitrate-rich fertilisers and slurry from livestock. And when the contamination reaches rivers it damages life there, and can even create dead zones off the coast, as in the Gulf of Mexico.
    Chronic problem
    Chemicals are a frequent pollutant. When we think of chemical contamination it is often images of events like Bhopal that come to mind.
  • Cost of air pollution around the world
    Cost of air pollution around the world
    But the problem is widespread. One study says 7-20% of cancers are attributable to poor air and pollution in homes and workplaces.
    The WHO, concerned about chemicals that persist and build up in the body, especially in the young, says we may "be conducting a large-scale experiment with children's health".
    Some man-made chemicals, endocrine disruptors like phthalates and nonylphenol — a breakdown product of spermicides, cosmetics and detergents — are blamed for causing changes in the genitals of some animals.
    Affected species include polar bears — so not even the Arctic is immune. And the chemicals climb the food chain, from fish to mammals — and to us.
    About 70,000 chemicals are on the market, with around 1,500 new ones appearing annually. At least 30,000 are thought never to have been comprehensively tested for their possible risks to people.
    Trade-off
    But the snag is that modern society demands many of them, and some are essential for survival.
    So while we invoke the precautionary principle, which always recommends erring on the side of caution, we have to recognise there will be trade-offs to be made.
    A worker carries dead fish in a basket at Kankaria Lake in Ahmadabad

AP
    Chemical pollution was blamed for killing fish in Kankaria Lake in Ahmadabad, India
    The pesticide DDT does great damage to wildlife and can affect the human nervous system, but can also be effective against malaria. Where does the priority lie?
    The industrialised world has not yet cleaned up the mess it created, but it is reaping the benefits of the pollution it has caused. It can hardly tell the developing countries that they have no right to follow suit.
    Another complication in tackling pollution is that it does not respect political frontiers. There is a UN convention on transboundary air pollution, but that cannot cover every problem that can arise between neighbours, or between states which do not share a border.
    Perhaps the best example is climate change — the countries of the world share one atmosphere, and what one does can affect everyone.
    For one and all
    One of the principles that is supposed to apply here is simple — the polluter pays.
    Plastic bottles, copyright Science
    A recent study detailed the plastic litter that pollutes the marine environment
    Sometimes it is obvious who is to blame and who must pay the price. But it is not always straightforward to work out just who is the polluter, or whether the rest of us would be happy to pay the price of stopping the pollution.
    One way of cleaning up after ourselves would be to throw less away, designing products to be recycled or even just to last longer.
    Previous generations worked on the assumption that discarding our waste was a proper way to be rid of it, so we used to dump nuclear materials and other potential hazards at sea, confident they would be dispersed in the depths.
    We now think that is too risky because, as one author wrote, "there's no such place as 'away' — and there's no such person as the 'other'".
    Ask not for whom the bell tolls — it tolls for thee, and for me
    Planet Under Pressure
    A six-part series looking at the biggest problems facing the Earth

    Introducing Planet Under Pressure

    PART 5: CLIMATE CHANGE

    Entering uncharted waters?
    Rising tides
    Life in Bangladesh's low-lying Ganges delta.

    PART 6: FIGHTING POLLUTION

    Pollution: A life and death issue
    Child on nebuliser in south DurbanFight for clean air
    Durban poor take the pollution issue into their own hands
    Photojournal: Living with pollution
    Map: Pollution hotspots
    Quiz: Are you pollution-savvy?

    COMPETITION
    Green and pleasant
    Enter our contest — design an eco-friendly garden

    FEATURES
    ChimneyChanging Earth — In pictures: Your changing world
    Readers' pictures of the effects of pollution and climate change

    Your eco-friendly garden designs
    "How I'd change the world..."

    SECTIONS
    Part 1: Species under threat
    Part 2: World water crisis
    Part 3: Soaring energy demand
    Part 4: Can the planet feed us?
    Part 5: Tackling climate change
    Part 6: Facing climate change


    RELATED BBC LINKS:
    Global warming?
    2015 — Where will we be?

    RELATED INTERNET LINKS:
    AGU Fall Meeting 2004
    Frederick Nelson
    Permafrost and Climate in Europe Project
    Arctic Council
    UNEP — chemicals programme
    World Health Organisation
    European Chemical Industry Council
    WWF — Toxic chemicals
    Environmental Protection Agency
         Nobel Peace Prize Lecture Wangari Maathai — Tree Planter     

    OZONE DEPLETION

    2006 is the largest area and has the thinnest recorded levels of ozone
    From September 21 to 30, the average area of the ozone hole was the largest ever observed, at 10.6 million square miles.
    40 million tonnes of ozone lost during the 2006 southern hemisphere winter
    The largeness of the 2006 hole, combined with the most thinning of ozone has resulted in a new depletion record for ozone in the stratosphere.
    2006 sees greatest loss of ozone ever
    Ozone layer hits new depletion record October 2006
    June 2010 304th consecutive month with combined land and surface temperature above 20th century average
    Russia 2010 global warming.

World experiencing the hottest year on record, the US based National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reports, with large parts of Canada, Africa, Europe and the Middle East facing abnormally warm temperatures. 

NOAA suggest that 2010 is to be the warmest year since records began in 1880.

First six months of 2010 hotter than first half of 1998 previous hottest year.

June 2010 304th consecutive month with combined land and surface temperature above 20th century average

Photo AP
    Playing in the Russian heatwave
    They had to break up the CO2 bands — adding CO2 dispersant to the chemtrails — because the CO2 bands were causing the ozone holes to get out of control!
    And they did it!
    They reduced the ozone holes!
    If they had'n adon tha' they'd a'be no life!
    Not for them!
    Not for anyone — or anything!
    Or most anything!
    But then the climate got so bad due to their seeding that you all laughed at the carbon-trading scheme!
    They overstretched!
    So now CO2 band dispersal has stopped!
    Hallelujah — back comes 'Global warming'
    Money!   Money!   Money!
    Glorious more money for those who control the world's purse strings!
    2015 Update
    Despite all the evidence of corrupted global warming data, spraying the air with toxic chemicals continues.
    These Western politicians are really sick!
     
    HomeNewsWeatherScienceDisinformationSolutions
    Planetary Heating
    Sixteen of the 17 hottest years on record have occurred since 1980.
    1991 to 1995 were the five hottest consecutive years on record.
    1998 replaced 1997 as the hottest year in recorded history.
     
     
    1998 replaced 1997 as the hottest year in recorded history.
    2001 replaced 1997 as the second hottest year.
    2002 replaced 2001 as the second hottest year.
    The decade of the 1990s is the hottest decade of the millenium.
    The planet is heating at a rate faster than at any time in the last 10,000 years.
     
           2010 hottest first 6 months ever recorded      
           CO2 band dispersal had to be stopped!      
           Money!   Money!   Money! — glorious more money for those who control the world's purse strings!      
    U.S. Government Mad Scientists Geo-Engineer Atmosphere
    Paul Joseph Watson
    Prison Planet
    Friday, September 5, 2008
    U.S. Government Mad Scientists Geo-Engineer Atmosphere.

U.S. government scientists are bombarding the skies with the acid-rain causing pollutant sulphur dioxide in an attempt to fight global warming by “geo-engineering” the planet, despite the fact that injecting aerosols into the upper atmosphere carries with it a host of both known and unknown dangers.

Such programs merely scratch the surface of what is likely to be a gargantuan and overarching black-budget funded project to geo-engineer the planet, with little or no care for the unknown environmental consequences this could engender.

Photo: infowars.com/
    Such programs merely scratch the surface of what is likely to be a gargantuan and overarching black-budget funded project to geo-engineer the planet, with little or no care for the unknown environmental consequences this could engender.
    U.S. government scientists are bombarding the skies with the acid-rain causing pollutant sulphur dioxide in an attempt to fight global warming by “geo-engineering” the planet, despite the fact that injecting aerosols into the upper atmosphere carries with it a host of both known and unknown dangers.
    The proposal to disperse sulphur dioxide in an attempt to reflect sunlight was again raised in a London Guardian article this week entitled, Geoengineering: The radical ideas to combat global warming, in which Ken Caldeira, a leading climate scientist based at the Carnegie Institution in Stanford, California, promotes the idea of injecting the atmosphere with aerosols.
    “One approach is to insert “scatterers” into the stratosphere,” states the article.
    “Caldeira cites an idea to deploy jumbo jets into the upper atmosphere and deposit clouds of tiny particles there, such as sulphur dioxide.
    Dispersing around 1m tonnes of sulphur dioxide per year across 10m square kilometres of the atmosphere would be enough to reflect away sufficient amounts of sunlight.”
    Experiments similar to Caldeira’s proposal are already being carried out by U.S. government -backed scientists, such as those at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Savannah River National Laboratory in Aiken, S.C, who this year conducted studies which involved shooting huge amounts of particulate matter, in this case “porous-walled glass microspheres,” into the stratosphere.
    The project, which reached its conclusion this past April, is closely tied to an idea by Nobel Prize winner Paul Crutzen, who “proposed sending aircraft 747s to dump huge quantities of sulfur particles into the far-reaches of the stratosphere to cool down the atmosphere.”
    Such programs merely scratch the surface of what is likely to be a gargantuan and overarching black-budget funded project to geo-engineer the planet, with little or no care for the unknown environmental consequences this could engender.
    What is known about what happens when the environment is loaded with sulphur dioxide is bad enough, since the compound is the main component of acid rain, which according to the EPA:
    “Causes acidification of lakes and streams and contributes to the damage of trees at high elevations (for example, red spruce trees above 2,000 feet) and many sensitive forest soils.
    In addition, acid rain accelerates the decay of building materials and paints, including irreplaceable buildings, statues, and sculptures that are part of our nation’s cultural heritage.”
    The health effects of bombarding the skies with sulphur dioxide alone are enough to raise serious questions about whether such programs should even be allowed to proceed.
    The following health effects are linked with exposure to sulphur.
    Neurological effects and behavioural changes
    Disturbance of blood circulation
    Heart damage
    Effects on eyes and eyesight
    Reproductive failure
    Damage to immune systems
    Stomach and gastrointestinal disorder
    Damage to liver and kidney functions
    Hearing defects
    Disturbance of the hormonal metabolism
    Dermatological effects
    Suffocation and lung embolism
    According to the LennTech website:
    “Laboratory tests with test animals have indicated that sulfur can cause serious vascular damage in veins of the brains, the heart and the kidneys.
    These tests have also indicated that certain forms of sulfur can cause foetal damage and congenital effects.
    Mothers can even carry sulfur poisoning over to their children through mother milk.
    Finally, sulfur can damage the internal enzyme systems of animals.”
    This graphic proposes, “Spraying aluminum powder and barium oxide into high levels of the atmosphere, again delivered by aircraft, to increase planetary reflectance (albedo) and cloud cover.”

High levels of barium have been found in substances associated with chemtrails.

U.S. Government Mad Scientists Geo-Engineer Atmosphere.

U.S. government scientists are bombarding the skies with the acid-rain causing pollutant sulphur dioxide in an attempt to fight global warming by “geo-engineering” the planet, despite the fact that injecting aerosols into the upper atmosphere carries with it a host of both known and unknown dangers.

Such programs merely scratch the surface of what is likely to be a gargantuan and overarching black-budget funded project to geo-engineer the planet, with little or no care for the unknown environmental consequences this could engender.

Photo: infowars.com/
    This graphic proposes:
    “Spraying aluminum powder and barium oxide into high levels of the atmosphere, again delivered by aircraft, to increase planetary reflectance (albedo) and cloud cover.”
    High levels of barium have been found in substances associated with chemtrails.
    Fred Singer, president of the Science Environmental Policy Project and a skeptic of man-made global warming theories, warns that the consequences of tinkering with the planet’s delicate eco-system could have far-reaching dangers.
    “If you do this on a continuous basis, you would depress the ozone layer and cause all kinds of other problems that people would rather avoid,” said Singer.
    Even Greenpeace’s chief UK scientist — a staunch advocate of the man-made global warming explanation — Doug Parr has slammed attempts to geo-engineer the planet as “outlandish” and “dangerous”.
    Stephen Schneider of Stanford University, who recently proposed a bizarre plan to send spaceships into the upper atmosphere that would be used to block out the Sun, admits that geo-engineering could cause “conflicts between nations if geoengineering projects go wrong.”
    Given all the immediate dangers associated with bombarding the atmosphere with sulphur dioxide, along with the unknown dangers of other geo-engineering projects, many people are concerned that “chemtrails” could be a secret component of the same agenda to alter the Earth’s eco-system.
    Reports of chemtrails, jet plumes emitted from planes that hang in the air for hours and do not dissipate, often blanketing the sky in criss-cross patterns, have increased dramatically over the last 10 years.
    Many have speculated that they are part of a government program to alter climate, inoculate humans against certain pathogens, or even to toxify humans as part of a population reduction agenda.
    In conducting Google searches, one finds discussion, such as this example, of using sulphur dioxide as a jet fuel additive to be dispersed over the world during routine commercial flights.
    “I suggest that both the sulphur dioxide and the silica particles could be delivered into the stratosphere by dissolving an additive in jet aviation fuel,” writes engineer John Gorman, who has conducted experiments to test the feasibility of such a scenario.
    “We would want to burn fuel containing the additive specifically when the aircraft was cruising in the lower stratosphere,” he adds.
    Earlier this year, KSLA news investigation found that a substance that fell to earth from a high altitude chemtrail contained high levels of Barium (6.8 ppm) and Lead (8.2 ppm) as well as trace amounts of other chemicals including arsenic, chromium, cadmium, selenium and silver.
    Of these, all but one are metals, some are toxic while several are rarely or never found in nature.
    The newscast focuses on Barium, which its research shows is a “hallmark of chemtrails.”
    KSLA found Barium levels in its samples at 6.8 ppm or “more than six times the toxic level set by the EPA.”
    The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality confirmed that the high levels of Barium were “very unusual,” but commented that “proving the source was a whole other matter” in its discussion with KSLA.
    KSLA also asked Mark Ryan, Director of the Poison Control Center, about the effects of Barium on the human body. Ryan commented that “short term exposure can lead to anything from stomach to chest pains and that long term exposure causes blood pressure problems.”
    The Poison Control Center further reported that long-term exposure, as with any harmful substance, would contribute to weakening the immune system, which many speculate is the purpose of such man-made chemical trails.
    Indeed, barium oxide has cropped up repeatedly as a contaminant from suspected geoengineering experimentation.
    KSLA also put aerosolized-chemical testing in its historical context, citing a voluminous number of unclassified tests exposed in 1977 Senate hearings.
    The tests included experimenting with biochemical compounds on the public.
    KSLA reports that “239 populated areas were contaminated with biological agents between 1949 and 1969.”
    One of the accepted truisms of scientific study is the fact that if scientists are proposing an idea, then those scientists with access to the bottomless pit of black-budget secret government funding are already doing it.
    It is highly likely that chemtrails are merely one manifestation of “geo-engineering” that is taking place without proper debate, notification or any form of legality, and with a callous disregard for the potential dangers to both our health and our environment.
    Truth Rising
    9/11 Chronicles Part One: Truth Rising
    © 2008 Alex Jones | Infowars.com is an Alex Jones company. All rights reserved.
    Environment concerns
    Cyclones, Hurricanes and weather global cooling
    Chemtrails and health
    Toxic Metals and Chemical Aerosols
    For more than a decade, first the United States and then Canada’s citizens have been subjected to a 24/7/365 day aerosol assault over our heads made of a toxic brew of poisonous heavy metals, chemicals, and other dangerous ingredients.
    The US Department of Defense [DOD] and military have been systematically blanketing all our skies with what are known as Chemtrails (also known as Stratospheric Aerosol Geoengineering).
    Rather, planes (fitted with special nozzles) release aerosols “lines” in the sky that do not evaporate.
    Multiple planes are deployed, flying parallel (or often “checkerboard” patterns) overhead; and soon the sky is blanketed with many grayish-white lines [miles and miles long, although this is changing].
    This clandestine program now includes aerosol-spraying planes in North America, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand [all NATO countries].
    2006 is the largest area and has the thinnest recorded levels of ozone
    From September 21 to 30, the average area of the ozone hole was the largest ever observed, at 10.6 million square miles.
    40 million tonnes of ozone lost during the 2006 southern hemisphere winter
    The largeness of the 2006 hole, combined with the most thinning of ozone has resulted in a new depletion record for ozone in the stratosphere.
    2006 sees greatest loss of ozone ever
    Ozone layer hits new depletion record October 2006
    Graph of Ozone depletion as of October 19 2006.
    Current year compared against past 10 years.
    Ozone Hole depletion 2006 graph.

Graph over four month period August thru November and part December.

Current year compared against past 10 years.

Red: 2006 depletion

Blue 2005 depletion

Green: 2003 depletion

Dotted black line mean for past ten years

2006 the largest area and the thinnest recorded levels of ozone

Previously 1998 had been the thinnest ozone hole has recorded, around 100 dobson units

2000 peaked at 28 million Sq Km, the previous largest area of ozone loss

40 million tonnes of ozone lost during the 2006 southern hemisphere winter

The largeness of the 2006 hole, combined with the most thinning of ozone has resulted in a new depletion record for ozone in the stratosphere.

Ozone layer hits new depletion record October 2006

2006 sees greatest loss of ozone ever.

2007, 2008, 2009 have seen similar slightly less losses.

Photo: www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/stratosphere/polar/
    October 1, 2009
    Ozone Hole depletion years 2007 2008 and 2009 to October 1, 2009 graph.

2009 ozone hold depletion year compared over past ten years.

Red: 2009 depletion

Blue 2008 depletion

Green: 2007 depletion

Dotted black line mean for past ten years

2006 the largest area and the thinnest recorded levels of ozone

Previously 1998 had been the thinnest ozone hole has recorded, around 100 dobson units

2000 peaked at 28 million Sq Km, the previous largest area of ozone loss

40 million tonnes of ozone lost during the 2006 southern hemisphere winter

The largeness of the 2006 hole, combined with the most thinning of ozone has resulted in a new depletion record for ozone in the stratosphere.

Ozone layer hits new depletion record October 2006

2006 sees greatest loss of ozone ever

2007, 2008, 2009 have seen similar slightly less losses.

Photo: www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/stratosphere/polar/
                 Up to date ozone hole stats graph     
                 Todays TOMS Global image     
    Satellite measurements of Arctic ozone show it is 15% to 30% lower than typically observed in the years following 1979 — when satellite records began.
    In 2000 the ozone hole in the Antarctic expanded to 28 million square kilometers, the largest area of depletion ever recorded.
    The 2001 ozone hole spread to cover an area of 25 million square kilometers, with increased thinning inside and around its perimeter.
    There was less thinning in the austral winter of 2002.   A slighter warming in the stratosphere possibly from a spin-off of the El Niño effect.
    The ozone hole in September 2003, the month usually showing the lowest levels of the year over the Antarctic, grew rapidly and peaked in size at around 28 million square kilometres (roughly twice the size of Antarctica) in mid September.
    The ozone holes of September 2004 and 2005 were recorded at between 22 and 25 million square kilometres but thinning as in 2000.
    The 2006 ozone hole area is an all time record of 28 million square kilometres reached in 2000.
    Data from European Space Agency Envisat satellite show that some 40 million tonnes of ozone were lost during the 2006 southern hemisphere winter.
    This is one million tonnes greater than the ozone loss previous record of 2000.
    The largeness of the 2006 hole, combined with an almost equal to the most thinning of ozone reached in 1998, has resulted in a new depletion record for ozone in the stratosphere.
    Ozone layer hits new depletion record as of 2006
    Ozone Hole September 24 2006.

From September 21-30, 2006 the average area of the ozone hole was the largest ever observed, at 10.6 million square miles.

This image, from Sept. 24, the Antarctic ozone hole was equal to the record single-day largest area of 11.4 million square miles, reached on Sept. 9, 2000. Satellite instruments monitor the ozone layer, and we use their data to create the images that depict the amount of ozone.

The blue and purple colors are where there is the least ozone, and the greens, yellows, and reds are where there is more ozone.

Photo: http://www.nasa.gov/vision/earth/lookingatearth/ozone_record.html
    Ozone Hole September 24 2006.
    From September 21-30, 2006 the average area of the ozone hole was the largest ever observed, at 10.6 million square miles.
    This image, from Sept. 24, the Antarctic ozone hole was equal to the record single-day largest area of 11.4 million square miles, reached on Sept. 9, 2000. Satellite instruments monitor the ozone layer, and we use their data to create the images that depict the amount of ozone.
    The blue and purple colors are where there is the least ozone, and the greens, yellows, and reds are where there is more ozone.
    Scientists from NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colo., use balloon-borne instruments to measure ozone directly over the South Pole.
    By Oct. 9, the total column ozone had plunged to 93 DU from approximately 300 DU in mid-July.
    More importantly, nearly all of the ozone in the layer between eight and 13 miles above the Earth's surface had been destroyed.
    In this critical layer, the instrument measured a record low of only 1.2 DU., having rapidly plunged from an average non-hole reading of 125 DU in July and August.
    The numbers mean the ozone is virtually gone in this layer of the atmosphere said David Hofmann director of the Global Monitoring Division at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory.
          Photo: NASA      
    While lowest values of ozone are still being recorded over East Antarctica, a greater depletion now extends to a wider area across the Southern Ocean.
    As has previously been mentioned, global lowering of temperatures in the stratosphere correlates with increasing loss of ozone.
    As mean global surface temperatures have increased, stratosphere temperatures have lowered.
    Except for anomalies caused by the volcanic eruption of El Chichon in 1982, and Mt. Pinatubo in 1991, stratospheric temperatures continue to show a marked downward turn. The complexity of all factors that destroy ozone is still a mixing of theories.   Water vapor, reduced temperature, chemical and particulate reactions, all intermingle in these theories.
    It is obvious volcanic eruptions warm the stratosphere, yet with this warming there is major ozone loss — due to increased particulates and chemicals reacting with ozone.
    Despite the major effort to ban CFC’s, and other chemicals, there is at present only a slight decrease in chlorine (the destroyer of ozone).   Various chemicals continue to seep up from the troposphere.   Increasing polar stratospheric clouds, and a general lowering of stratospheric temperatures, is a trend that itself will create further ozone loss.
    Another factor recently examined are bands of infrared waves.   Scientists can now detected long waves that they have not previously been able to record, thousands of miles in length, which are naturally emitted from earth.   These long waves create warmth if the radiation dissipates in the stratosphere.
    Earth at night is cooled by long wave emissions flowing from the surface.   These emissions have in the past moved out from the troposphere into the stratosphere.   Now gasses in new temporary bands in the troposphere, (created by greenhouse gasses from Earth) are absorbing the long wave bands before they reach the stratosphere.   These screens are increasing.   Less long waves entering the stratosphere is one more factor in the lower temperatures of this region.   Lower temperatures in the stratosphere means less ozone is produced.
    With fewer infrared long waves entering the stratosphere, with an increased emission of methane entering the stratosphere — methane is transformed into water — with carbon dioxide and methane enhancing the transport of water vapor into the stratosphere, there is further concern in the complexity to the loss of ozone.

    British Antarctic Survey Ozone

    Halley, Rothera and Vernadsky/Faraday

    Information about ozone at Halley, Rothera and Vernadsky/Faraday stations.
         For updated inf click here:                       www.antarctica.ac.uk/met/jds/ozone/     
    OMI Total Ozone depletion South Pole, October 1, 2009.

Image: NASA
    Antarctic Ozone Hole September 16, 2010 — NASA
    Situation at 2010
    December 31
    Ozone values over parts of the Antarctic Peninsula fell rapidly rapidly to around 240 DU in the first half of July, but then recovered.
    By early August the ozone hole had begun to form, though it was a slow start to the season and significant depletion did not commence until towards the end of the month.
    Ozone values at Rothera fell below the ozone hole threshold for the first time on August 17, but then recovered.
    The ozone hole was at its largest in late September at around 20 million square kilometres, which was well below the average size of the last decade.
    This slow start and relatively shallow ozone hole was linked to warmer than usual stratospheric temperatures reducing the volume of stratospheric clouds early in the season.
    After its peak the ozone hole slowly declined in area but was a record size for the time of year during December.
    Ozone values finally rose above the "ozone hole" threshold of 220 DU around December 21 2010.
    In the belt surrounding Antarctica outside the polar vortex ozone, values peaked at a little above 400 DU.
    At its largest during August and September 2010, the polar vortex was slightly above the average area of the last decade and at 70hPa persisted well into December.
    The temperature of the ozone layer within it was at the winter minimum in August and had risen above the PSC formation threshold by early November.
    The fringes of the ozone hole extended over the tip of South America and South Georgia over September 6 - 9, 16 - 21, October 10 - 12 and 18 - 23 2010.

    OMI Total Ozone depletion South Pole, October 1, 2009.

Image: NASA
    Situation at 2009 September 30
    The 2009 ozone hole has formed over the heart of the continent.
    Ozone values north of the polar vortex are near 450 DU in places, whilst inside the vortex ozone values are still dropping as ozone depletion intensifies.
    Lowest values are over the centre of the continent, with minimum values below 120 DU.
    Ozone levels are below normal across the continent, with depletion exceeding 50% in the worst affected areas, and there are areas above normal in the circumpolar belt.
    The temperature of the ozone layer over Antarctica is just past the annual minimum, and a large area is cold enough for polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) to form.
    During the early winter, the polar vortex was often rather more elliptical than it was in 2008, and this lead to some early depletion in circumpolar regions as stratospheric clouds became exposed to sunlight.
    It reverted to a more circular circulation as winter progressed and this led to another relatively slow start to the growth of the ozone hole (as measured by NASA/SBUV2), with the "hole" not beginning until mid August.
    The vortex became more elliptical again in late August, with South Georgia being affected by the fringes of the ozone hole between September 2 and 6.
    The hole grew to reach an area of around 24 million square kilometres by mid September 2009, but declined to 21 million square kilometres towards the end of the month of September 2009.
    Forecasts suggest that the tip of South America has been affected by the fringes of the ozone hole from September 24 for several days and will be again from around October 4, 2009.

    Situation at 2008 November 6
    The 2008 ozone hole season is past its peak and ozone levels over Antarctica are rising.
    During the initial stages, the ozone hole was much smaller than has been usual for August, but it grew rapidly as stratospheric clouds were exposed to sunlight.
    It covered over 25 million square kilometres in mid September, about the same as last year and remained at around 24 million square kilometres until early October.
    It is now around 15 million square kilometres, which is larger than it was at this time in 2007.
    The temperature of the ozone layer over Antarctica is rising from the winter minimum as the spring warming takes hold, but some areas are still cold enough for polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) to continue to exist.
    PSCs were seen from Rothera on several occasions and also at Halley.
    Ozone values are above 350 DU in parts of the circum-polar regions, which is a bit lower than at this time last year.
    Lowest values, near 150 DU, are over Dronning Maud Land.
    The temperature within the polar vortex is generally a little below the normal.
    The vortex has begun to show a more elliptical circulation pattern, and the ozone hole extended over the tip of South America, the Falkland Islands and South Georgia between October 28th and 30th.

    Situation at 2007 September 24
    The winter polar vortex is in place, with higher ozone values, exceeding 500 DU in places, outside the vortex.
    In general the vortex is more disturbed this year than it was last year.
    The temperature of the ozone layer within the vortex is sufficiently cold that stratospheric clouds have formed and this has led to rapid chemical depletion of ozone.
    Inside the vortex, ozone values are below 220 DU, with the ozone hole covering much of the continent.
    Lowest ozone values are below 125 DU in central Antarctica.
    Early August saw the largest ozone hole recorded for this time of year, although at the same time very high ozone levels existed over the northern Antarctic Peninsula.
    The vortex was more circular in mid September but is returning to an elliptical shape and warming slightly.
    In mid September its area was 24 million square kilometres, but has since declined to 19 million square kilometres, rather smaller than the average for the last decade at this time of year.
    Some areas of Antarctica saw ozone values down to ozone hole levels (less than 220 DU) in mid June, suggesting the possibility of early chemical depletion, combined with some dynamic processes.
    The tip of South America and the Falkland Islands saw ozone levels below 250 DU on August 24, with South Georgia experiencing similar levels on September 4.
    The fringes of the ozone hole were over South Georgia on September 11.
    The hole is expected to extend across the tip of South America, the Falkland Islands and South Georgia over September 22 - 25 and strengthen again.

    Situation at 2006 October 13
    Ozone levels across Antarctica dropped rapidly in September and are now near their minimum.
    Lowest levels are currently near 100 DU over parts of Antarctica.
    The polar vortex is shrinking, but remains significantly larger than average for this time of year.
    Temperatures within it are generally below the normal for the time of year.
    The ozone hole grew rapidly from mid August and reached nearly 28 million square kilometres in size at the equinox.
    It was the largest on record for the week preceding the equinox, although not an absolute record in size.
    It is now shrinking, although at 24 million square kilometres it is at a record size for mid October.
    The ozone hole has become much more elliptical and the edge of the ozone hole is making passes over the tip of South America and South Georgia.
    Antarctic Antarctic ozone hole movie 2006/2007 2006/2007 Ozone hole movie is produced from TOMS images.
    Halley — Total ozone:   This figure [updated 2006 October 19] shows the variation in 2006 — 2007 and the normal for 1957-72.
    A few moon observations carried out on August 8 suggested that ozone values were not far from normal at around 300 DU.
    Mean values have dropped fairly steadily since then, reaching around 125 DU in early October (60% down on the normal for the time of year). 
    This corresponds to a decline of roughly 1% per day since early August. 
    The minimum value so far recorded is 115 DU on October 7.  By mid October values were rising, and are now around 140 DU (55% down on the normal for the time of year).
    Rothera — Total ozone:    Ozone values for the first two months of 2006 were around 270 DU, but slowly increased to around 300 DU at the winter solstice.
    Mean values fell after the solstice and reached a minimum of around 120 DU in early October.
    There is oscillation with amplitude of around 40 DU and period about a month. 
    The minimum daily value reached so far is 105 DU.  A significant rise in ozone amount began around October 10.
    This figure [updated 2006 October 19] shows the variation during 2006.
    Vernadsky — Total ozone:   The early observations show significant ozone depletion.
    No new data has been received from the station since mid August.
    This figure [updated 2006 August 31] shows the variation in 2006 — 2007 and the normal for 1957-72.
    Temperature and PSCs:   The 100 hPa pressure level is near the base of the ozone layer, but is reached by most radiosonde flights.
    The temperature at this height becomes sufficiently cold that polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) can exist widely during the winter.
    The temperature is below the PSC threshold over most of Antarctica.
    PSCs have been reported from  Rothera.
    Halley — 100 hPa temperature:     The temperature at the 100 hPa level is significantly below the normal, but beginning to warm, although it remains at winter levels.
    This figure [updated 2006 October 19] shows the variation at Halley in 2006 — 2007 and the normal for 1957-72.
    Peninsula — 100 hPa temperature:     The temperature at the 100 hPa level was below or close to the normal during August.
    It generally declined during September and is now substantially below the normal for early October.
    This figure [updated 2006 October 10]  shows the variation in 2006 — 2007 and the normal for 1957-72.
    Satellite: Satellite imagery gives a global perspective on the ozone hole.  Our 2006/2007 Antarctic ozone hole movie [updated 2006 October 6] is produced from OMI images.
    The NCEP and KNMI analyses shown on the Canadian Met Service daily ozone maps pages give a good analysis in the Southern Hemisphere but the NCEP forecasts tend to increase ozone amounts within the ozone hole. US NWS CPC plots from NOAA show the current area of the ozone hole
    The ozone hole passed over the tip of South America and the Falkland Islands around October 4, October 7 to 10 and over South Georgia between September 18 to 24 and October 9 to 12.
    The Sciamachy uv index from the ESA  Tropospheric Emission Monitoring Internet Service shows the exposure risk at any location.
    Arctic:  Ozone values generally range between 250 and  350 DU (within about 15% of the normal) at the moment, with the UK experiencing values close to normal.
    Ozone amounts are generally declining towards the autumn minimum.
    Ozone values over the Arctic since June are shown in our Northern Hemisphere TOMS movie.
    Temperatures declined sufficiently during the northern winter of 2005/6 for stratospheric clouds to form and for chemical and dynamic ozone depletion to take place.
    "Ultra-cirrus" clouds, at heights above 20km were briefly visible after sunset on January 20 from the UK.
    These are likely to have been diffuse stratospheric clouds that are thinner but more widespread than the nacreous clouds.
    For more UK information see the DEFRA UK Stratospheric Ozone Measurements page.
    Reports of a substantial Arctic ozone hole forming in response to a solar proton event in the spring of 2004 are somewhat exaggerated.
    Although this did lead to substantial depletion of up to 60% near the top of the ozone layer, less than 10% of the total ozone column is in this region.
    The event therefore had less effect than normal day to day changes and no ozone hole was formed.
    The spring of 2005 by contrast had much lower stratospheric temperatures and significant chemical ozone depletion did take place. 
    Although the column ozone never quite dropped to "ozone hole" levels, the amount of ozone affected by chemical depletion was broadly comparable to that seen in the Antarctic ozone hole.
    Equator: Ozone levels are normally lowest over the topics and OMI data shows nothing unusual.


    Situation at 2005 September 9
    The atmospheric circulation over the Antarctic continent is in its winter state.
    Stratospheric temperatures are cold enough for stratospheric clouds to form and they have been observed at Rothera and Vernadsky.
    There is widespread ozone depletion over the continent, with ozone amounts over 50% down on the normal for the time of year in places.
    Lowest ozone amounts are approaching 100 DU, with most areas of the edge region below 200 DU.
    The lowest ozone areas are over the base of the Antarctic Peninsula and the Weddell Sea.
    Overall the area of the ozone hole is around 22 million square kilometres but is a little smaller in size than the 2003 hole, which was one of the largest on record during August.
    Ozone values at Rothera are amongst the lowest recorded at this time of year.
    Arctic: Ozone values over the Arctic during the course of a year are shown in our Northern Hemisphere TOMS movie for 2004/2005 (see also Northern Hemisphere TOMS movie for 2005/2006).
    Antarctic Antarctic ozone hole movie 2005/2006 2005/2006 Ozone hole movie is produced from TOMS images.

    Situation at 2004 September 21
    The ozone hole (where ozone values are below 220 DU) grew rapidly from mid August to early September and covers around 20 million square kilometres, about average over the last decade.
    It has only increased a little in area over the last fortnight.
    The lowest ozone values are over the southern Antarctic Peninsula and off Enderby Land, and here values are over 40% below normal.
    Ozone values are higher in a broad band between 60°S and 30°S, in places exceeding 400 DU.
    The edge of the ozone hole passed over the southern tip of South America, the Falkland Islands and South Georgia from September 10 to 12.
    It is expected to do so again from September 19 to 24, with larger ozone depletion possible from September 21 to 23, possibly affecting regions as far north as 40°S.
    Arctic: Ozone values over the Arctic during the course of a year are shown in our Northern Hemisphere TOMS movie for 2003/2004 (see also Northern Hemisphere TOMS movie for 2004/2005).
    Antarctic Antarctic ozone hole movie 2004/2005 2004/2005 Ozone hole movie is produced from TOMS images.

    Situation at September 2003
    The ozone hole in September, usually showing the lowest levels of the year in September, has grown rapidly and peaked in size at around 28 million square kilometres (roughly twice the size of Antarctica) in mid September.
    It was larger than previously for the time of year in August and early September, but the maximum size only equalled the all time record. 
    Very low ozone levels have been recorded over the Antarctic Peninsula. 
    The edge of the ozone hole touched the tip of South America on September 6 — 7. 
    Temperatures in the ozone layer are low enough that Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs), the key precursors to significant ozone depletion, have formed widely over the continent and ozone levels are dropping quickly.
    The ozone hole is usually largest in early September and deepest in late September to early October.
    Halley:  The Sun has risen at Halley and some ozone observations are now possible, though these are of low accuracy due to the low solar elevation. 
    Some measurements made using weak moonlight in early August show ozone values around 220 DU (25% depletion).
    Routine solar observations show values declining from late August and by mid September they had dropped to around 130 DU (55% depletion).
    Rothera:  Values at Rothera showed a slight increase from around 270 DU at the beginning of 2003 to around 300 DU in early June, with a long period variation (about a month) of around 30 DU.
    The day to day variation was around around 15 DU.
    In early June values began to fall, reaching around 250 DU by the end of July. 
    Values fell rapidly in August, reaching 135 DU by mid September, with day to day variation around 25 DU. 
    Ozone sonde flights from Rothera are now showing substantial depletion between 15 and 23 kilometres, with nearly 100% depletion at some altitudes.
    Vernadsky:  Early observations show ozone values declining from around 270 DU (10% depletion) in late July to around 170 DU (45% depletion) in early September, then recovering to around 200 DU in mid September. 
    The daily mean of 160 DU on August 25 is the second lowest recorded for the month.
    Temperature and PSCs:   The temperature of the ozone layer above Antarctica is at winter values, and  PSCs are widespread.
    Halley reported sighting of PSC on July 28.
    There has been a radiosonde programme of three flights per week at Rothera since 2003 March.
    One of the largest holes on record
    Overall it is clear that this year we have one of the largest ozone holes on record.
    Antarctic: Antarctic ozone hole movie 2003/2004 Ozone hole movie is produced from TOMS images.
    The NCEP analyses shown on the Canadian Met Service daily ozone maps pages give a good analysis in the Southern Hemisphere but the forecasts tend to increase ozone amounts within the ozone hole. 
    US NWS CPC plots from NOAA show the current area of the ozone hole.
    Arctic: Ozone values over the Arctic during the course of a year are shown in our Northern Hemisphere TOMS movie for 2002/2003 (see also Northern Hemisphere TOMS movie for 2003/2004).
    Ozone values are slowly declining from the spring maximum, with values over the UK around the normal.
    Stratospheric clouds were observed from Kjeller in Norway on December 20 (450Kb pdf),.
    Stratospheric temperatures are currently well above the PSC threshold. 
    Equator: Ozone levels are normally lowest over the topics and TOMS data shows nothing unusual.
    TOVS data has a calibration problem and shows values that are significantly lower than those that are measured by other means.
    Is the ozone hole recovering ?  Recent reports in the media suggest that the ozone layer over Antarctica is now recovering.
    This message is a little confused.
    Recent measurements at surface monitoring stations show that the loading of ozone destroying chemicals at the surface has been dropping since about 1994 and is now about 6% down on that peak. 
    The stratosphere lags behind the surface by several years and the loading of ozone depleting chemicals in the ozone layer is at or near the peak. 
    Satellite measurements show that the rate of decline in ozone amount in the upper stratosphere is slowing, however the total ozone amount is still declining.
    The small size of the 2002 ozone hole was nothing to do with any reduction in ozone depleting chemicals and it will be a decade or more before we can unambiguously say that the ozone hole is recovering.
    This assumes that the decline in ozone depleting chemicals continues and that there are no other perturbations to the ozone layer.
    If the decline in ozone stabilizes, and the ozone layer in the stratosphere becomes thicker, it will be the middle of this century or beyond before the ozone hole ceases to appear over Antarctica.
    What we saw in 2002 is just one extreme in the natural range of variation in the polar stratosphere and is the equivalent of an extreme in 'stratospheric weather'.
    See Ozone hole 2006 above
    Global warming and the ozone hole.  The ozone hole is a completely different phenomenon to global warming, however there are l between them.
    The ozone hole is caused by ozone depleting chemicals in the atmosphere, which have been produced by industry, for example CFCs.
    One link is that CFCs are also 'greenhouse gasses'.
    Enhanced global warming is a probable consequence of increasing amounts of 'greenhouse  gasses', such as carbon dioxide and methane, in the atmosphere.
    Although the surface of the earth warms, higher up the atmosphere cools, thus increasing the area susceptible to ozone depletion and providing another link between the two issues.
        For Toms, Arctic and Antarctic information,    
        and how ozone is produced and destroyed,    
        click here:     
        More on Ozone
        Ozone thinning 2003    
        Ozone talks fail over US demands    
    Global garden grows greener
    NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center—EOS Project Science Office
    June 05, 2003
    A NASA-Department of Energy jointly funded study concludes the Earth has been greening over the past 20 years.   As climate changed, plants found it easier to grow.
    The globally comprehensive, multi-discipline study appears in this week’s Science magazine.
    The article states climate changes have provided extra doses of water, heat and sunlight in areas where one or more of those ingredients may have been lacking.
    Plants flourished in places where climatic conditions previously limited growth.
    “Our study proposes climatic changes as the leading cause for the increases in plant growth over the last two decades, with lesser contribution from carbon dioxide fertilization and forest re-growth,” said Ramakrishna Nemani, the study’s lead author from the University of Montana, Missoula, Mont.
    From 1980 to 2000, changes to the global environment have included two of the warmest decades in the instrumental record; three intense El Niño events in 1982-83, 1987-88 and 1997-98; changes in tropical cloudiness and monsoon dynamics; and a 9.3 percent increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), which in turn affects man-made influences on climate.
    All these changes impact plant growth.
    Earlier studies by Ranga Myneni, Boston University (BU), and Compton Tucker, NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, Md., also co-authors of the study, reported increased growing seasons and woody biomass in northern high-latitude forests.
    Another co-author, Charles Keeling, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif., cautions no one knows whether these positive impacts are due to short-term climate cycles, or longer-term global climate changes.
    Also, a 36 percent increase in global population, from 4.45 billion in 1980 to 6.08 billion in 2000, overshadows the increases in plant growth.
    Nemani and colleagues constructed a global map of the Net Primary Production (NPP) of plants from climate and satellite data of vegetation greenness and solar radiation absorption.
    NPP is the difference between the CO2 absorbed by plants during photosynthesis, and CO2 lost by plants during respiration.
    NPP is the foundation for food, fiber and fuel derived from plants, without which life on Earth could not exist.
    Humans appropriate approximately 50 percent of global NPP.
    NPP globally increased on average by six percent from 1982 to 1999.
    Ecosystems in tropical zones and in the high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere accounted for 80 percent of the increase.
    NPP increased significantly over 25 percent of the global vegetated area, but decreased over seven percent of the area; illustrating how plants respond differently depending on regional climatic conditions.
    Climatic changes, over approximately the past 20 years, tended to be in the direction of easing climatic limits to plant growth.
    In general, in areas where temperatures restricted plant growth, it became warmer; where sunlight was needed, clouds dissipated; and where it was too dry, it rained more.
    In the Amazon, plant growth was limited by sun blocking cloud cover, but the skies have become less cloudy.
    In India, where a billion people depend on rain, the monsoon was more dependable in the 1990s than in the 1980s.
    The climate data for NPP calculations came from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Center for Environmental Prediction.
    Researchers used two independently derived 18-plus-year satellite datasets from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers on NOAA satellite.
    The team processed and improved the data at GSFC and BU.
    “Systematic observation of global vegetation is being continued by NASA’s Earth observing satellites.   Earth observing satellites are paving the way to find out if these biospheric responses are going to hold for the future,” adds Steve Running, another co-author from the University of Montana.
    NASA’s Earth Science Enterprise is committed to studying the primary causes of the Earth system variability, including both natural and human-induced causes.
         Nobel Peace Prize Lecture Wangari Maathai — Tree Planter     
         For Toms, Arctic and Antarctic information, and how ozone is produced, click here:   More on Ozone     
          CO2 record high levels in the atmosphere          
              Increases in carbon dioxide never exceeding 30 ppm in 1,000 years           
          — Now 30 ppm in last 17 years.           
          Highest for 800,000 years — Climate fear as carbon levels soar          
    Garden Grows Greener — 2017
    Garden Grows Greener — 2015-2016
    1987: ‘Global Warming’ Causes Sea Levels to Fall — 2016: ‘Global Warming’ Causes Slowdown In Sea Level Rise
    Over the last eight months, global temperatures over land have cooled a record 1.2 C.
    In the first week of October 2016, snow records across Canada and the US Rocky mountains saw 4x eclipses of previous records that stood for 100 years.
    Studies suggest the Sun is headed for a period of extremely low activity
           Global cooling: Record Over Last Eight Months      
           Queenland snow July 2015       
         Diminishing solar activity may bring new Ice Age by 2030      
         Things being equal, lower temperatures for much of Earth.      
    Garden Grows Greener — 2012-2013
    Garden Grows Greener — 2010-2011
    According to the Gulf Rescue Alliance, an organization composed of scientists, medical professionals and seafood industry professionals, among others, the Gulf of Mexico disaster cannot be simplified to the damage already caused by the oil spill.   It is worse, much worse.
    Why Is Damning New Evidence About Monsanto's Most Widely Used Herbicide Being Silenced?
    Deforestation of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest has increased almost sixfold, new data suggests.
    Gulf documentary reporter — It's really weird down here!
    MP3 gulf audio report download
    Sea turtles nest in record numbers, but many eggs don't hatch
    Garden Grows Greener — 2008-2009
    Environment disaster is perhaps the most singular evil the Illuminati and their political minions have yet come up with!
    All to further enrich those who already control 98% of the world's resources!
    From 1980 temperature has increased more than any increase before?   Or has it?
    21st CENTURY CLIMATE BLUEPRINTS: PERSPECTIVES FROM THE RECENT HISTORY OF THE ATMOSPHERE
    Oh my God, we’re having wars in, you know, Asia, killing millions of people over the hydrocarbons.
    Garden Grows Greener — 2006-2007
    Oct. 9, 2006 the total column ozone had plunged to 93 DU
    The coal industry has spent a lot of money promoting a technology called 'carbon capture and storage'
    Unemployment can be eliminated if governments established youth corps where people can work to tackle the environment
    People of all ages can clean up the mess the world has caused if governments would direct their energies towards this rather than police and military expenditure
           From Papal Indulgences to Carbon Credits       
         Carbon trafficking is powered by elite to retain control      
           DNA reveals Greenland's lush past     
    Why did you cut the trees grandma
     
    Unemployment can be eliminated if governments established youth corps where people can work to tackle the environment
    People of all ages can clean up the mess the world has caused if governments would direct their energies towards this rather than police and military expenditure
    I don’t know of an issue of a greater magnitude than the energy issue that humanity’s facing right now.
    Oh my God, we’re having wars in, you know, Asia, killing millions of people over the hydrocarbons.
    The issue is so multi-faceted, it’s so immense, that... Oh yes, this is being very carefully managed.
    Environment disaster is perhaps the most singular evil the Illuminati and their political minions have yet come up with!
    All to further enrich those who already control 98% of the world's resources!
    Those who have brought the planet to these crises!
    Those who need to be stripped of all their assets!
     TheWE.ccSee: State of the GardenThe Poles