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Mubarak says Iraq war to produce ''100 new bin Ladens''

31-03-2003

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak said on Monday the U.S.-led war on Iraq would produce "one hundred new bin Ladens," driving more Muslims to anti-Western militancy.

"When it is over, if it is over, this war will have horrible consequences," Mubarak told Egyptian soldiers in the city of Suez.

"Instead of having one bin Laden, we will have 100 bin Ladens," he added.

The Egyptian leader added that international commitments obliged his country to keep the Suez Canal open to all vessels.

"Crossing of ships of the Suez Canal is a right for all countries and is an international commitment that cannot be trampled with," he aired.

He repeated his previous call that all Middle East states, including Israel, should be free of weapons of mass destruction.



(Albawaba.com)


Peter Arnett tells Iraqi TV: US war plans ''fail''
31-03-2003
The U.S. war plan has "failed," veteran war correspondent Peter Arnett told Iraqi TV in an interview that aired Sunday.

"The first war plan has failed because of Iraqi resistance. Now they are trying to write another war plan," Arnett said. "Clearly, the American war planners misjudged the determination of the Iraqi forces."

Arnett, who is currently reporting for National Geographic Television and NBC News, added Iraq has given him and other reporters a "degree of freedom which we appreciate."

"I'd like to say from the beginning that the 12 years I've been coming here," Arnett said, "I've met unfailing courtesy and cooperation, courtesy from your people and cooperation from the Ministry of Information."

Arnett told the Iraqi TV interviewer that President Bush is facing a "growing challenge" about the "conduct of the war" within the United States.

"President Bush says he is concerned about the Iraqi people, but if Iraqi people are dying in numbers, then American policy will be challenged very strongly," he conveyed.

In the interview, Arnett said reports from Baghdad on civilians being killed are being shown in the United States, and "it helps those who oppose the war when you challenge the policy to develop their arguments."

On Baghdad, Arnett said "clearly this is a city that is disciplined, the population is responsive to the government's requirements of discipline," and "Iraqi friends tell me there is a growing sense of nationalism and resistance to what the United States and Britain is doing."

The longtime war correspondent said U.S. war planners miscalculated the will of Iraqis and he does "not understand how that happened."

He said his reports "would tell the Americans about the determination of the Iraqi forces, the determination of the government and the willingness to fight for their country."


(Albawaba.com)







© 2003 Al Bawaba (www.albawaba.com)






 
 
























































































































































































 
 





 
 




Faith Fippinger









The Book of Merlyn




The beating of the drum




 
 





 
For archives, these articles are being stored on TheWE.cc website.
The purpose is to advance understandings of environmental, political,
human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues.